Timeline

1950s | 1960s | 1970s | 1980s | 1990s | 2000s | 2010s

1950s

1950-1959

Discussions between CSIRO and the University of Sydney, and within the University, about establishing one or more high-end electron microscopes in Sydney.

1955-1956

Assistant Principal, Mr W. Harold Maze investigates and develops plans for a centralised electron microscopy service.

1956

The University of Sydney's Senate approved £25,000 for purchase and installation of an electron microscope.

1958

Formal establishment of the Electron Microscope Unit (EMU), underneath the Bank in Science Road, with arrival of the first electron microscope (Siemens Elmiskop 1) and first electron microscopist (Dr D. Gordon Drummond, Director).

1960s

1960

Akashi Tronscope TEM installed in EMU (by firm of Andrew Thom to allow demonstrations to potential purchasers).

1960

The first Vacation School in Electron Microscopy (5-10 December); first training course given to students from School of Botany.

1964

Philips EM200 TEM installed in EMU.

1968

New designations and academic positions for senior staff (Dr D.G. Drummond became Director of the EMU, Dr Cedric Shorey became Electron Microscopist at senior lecturer level and Dr Maret Vesk became Assistant Electron Microscopist at lecturer level).

1969

New designations and academic positions for senior staff (Dr D.G. Drummond became Director of the EMU, Dr Cedric Shorey became Electron Microscopist at senior lecturer level and Dr Maret Vesk became Assistant Electron Microscopist at lecturer level).

1970s

1971

First scanning electron microscope installed at the EMU, a Jeolco (JEOL) U3 with en-ergy dispersive and wavelength dispersive X-ray spectrometers for microanalysis.

1971

Dr Clive E. Nockolds joined EMU as second Assistant Electron Microscopist and fourth academic.

1971

Unit expands into the space formerly occupied by the University Stores.

1973

Dr Drummond retired; Dr Shorey appointed as Acting Director before moving to the Histology Department.

1973

EMU featured heavily in University of Sydney open day; write up in Sydney Morning Herald "Scientific Microscopes as Exhibits".

1974

Dr David J. H. Cockayne appointed as new Director.

1974

ETEC Autoprobe arrived, a scanning electron microscope dedicated to wavelength-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy.

1975

Dr Guy Cox appointed as Electron Microscopist; title now equivalent to level of lecturer; Drs Nockolds and Vesk "redefined" as Electron Microscopists.

1975

More room allocated to EMU in the Badham Building to accommodate growth in staff numbers, user numbers and training courses.

1975

EMU Thursday lunches started by Lorraine van der Lubbe and Ken Mason.

1976

4th Australian Conference on Electron Microscopy held at the University of Sydney, 9-12 February; Dr Cockayne co-chaired the conference with Dr Mel Dickson of UNSW.

1976

JEOL 100CX TEM installed; Siemens Elmiskop 1 TEM retired.

1978

Balzers Freeze Etch installed.

1979

Philips EM400 TEM commissioned as the first microscope with a clean vacuum system; it replaced the Philips EM200.

1979

ISI Super IIIA scanning electron microscope came free with the EM400.

1980s

1980

JEOL JSM 35C scanning electron microscope installed.

1981

EMU moved to Madsen Building in space recently vacated by the CSIRO.

1983

EMU produced first of a series of EMUser, a newsletter designed to keep users in-formed of developments in the unit; this ran on and off until 1996.

1983

First image analysis system installed; based on a microcomputer and touchpad system.

1984

The quarterly periodical Australian EM Newsletter was launched at the 8th Australian Conference on Electron Microscopy in Brisbane; Dr Guy Cox was editor and EMU staff members were heavily involved.

1984

Formal establishment of the N.W.G. Macintosh Centre for Quaternary Dating, partially funded from donations from the widow of Professor Neil William George Macintosh, building on the existing radiocarbon laboratory. The centre was administered through the EMU.

1985

Philips SEM505 installed.

1986

Philips 430 (300 kV TEM) operational; it was installed in 1985.

1987

Philips CM12 TEM installed (purchased by the Department of Occupational Health).

1987

Philips EM201 replaced by the newer Philips EM301 TEM, transferred from the Department of Anatomy. JEOL JSM U3 retired.

1987

Duty Microscopist system established to provide user support.

1988

Major air-conditioning refurbishments in the Madsen Building; most instruments were unavailable for one month.

1988-1989

The university's decision to devolve its organisational structures caused much uncertainty for the EMU and its fit to the new University of Sydney structure.

1990s

1990

Biorad MRC-600 confocal scanning optical microscope installed. Philips EM300 retired.

1991

Charging for photographic consumables began.

1991

IMAGELAB, the combined image analysis and confocal microscopy facility, opened by the Minister for Science and Technology in December.

1992

New instruments installed: JEOL JSM 6000F SEM, Siemens D5000 X-ray diffractometer (XRD), and Zeiss EM902 TEM.

1992

Corporate Development Grant from University of Sydney provided seed funds for a Business Manager to liaise with industry and manage their R&D projects.

1993

PARK AutoProbe LS scanned probe microscope installed.

1994

VG HB 601UX field-emission scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) installed.

1995

Australian Research Council funds the Australian Key Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis at the University of Sydney, which was a joint bid from the EMU and the School of Physics.

1996

ACEM14, the 14th Australian Conference on Electron Microscopy, was held at the University of Sydney.

1996

Philips XL30 scanning electron microscope installed.

1997

First students completed the Key Centre's Graduate Diploma in Science (Microscopy and Microanalysis); the Senate accredited the Master of Science (Microscopy and Microanalysis).

1998

JEOL P15 travelling, table-top SEM used by three high schools with dedicated resource kits.

1998

Graduate Certificate in Science (Microscopy and Microanalysis) and Master of Science (Microscopy and Microanalysis) offered as part of Key Centre's postgraduate courses.

1998

International Conference on Confocal Microscopy and 3D Image Processing sponsored by the Key Centre and held in the University of Sydney.

1999

Graduate Certificate in Science (Microscopy and Microanalysis) offered as part of Key Centre's postgraduate courses.

1999

Philips CM120 BioFilter TEM installed.

1999

Professor David J. H. Cockayne left the EMU for Oxford University, UK; Professor David McKenzie appointed as new Director of the Key Centre. Dr Clive Nockolds appointed Acting Director of the EMU.

2000s

2000

JEOL 3000F field-emission-gun TEM installed; Leica TCS SP2 multiphoton confocal microscope installed.

2000

Schools outreach program Microscopes on the Move was officially launched by Dr Karl Kruszelnicki at National Science Week. The program received an honourable mention for Outstanding Achievement in Collaboration in Education and Training in the BHERT awards for 2000.

2001

Associate Professor Simon P. Ringer appointed as Director of the EMU and Key Centre.

2002

NANO-MNRF (Nanostructural Analysis Network Organisation Major National Research Facility) established by the Department of Education, Science and Training; NANO is headquartered in the Key Centre.

2003

Skyscan 1072 micro-computed tomography platform installed.

2003

Major renovations of many existing and some new spaces in the Madsen Building to accommodate new staff and researchers -- including those from the NANO-MNRF -- various new instruments, and a new cell-culture laboratory.

2003

Launch of NANO-MNRF Annual Report by Senator John Tierney.

2003

EMU starts charging users for access to instruments.

2003

EMU goes to online booking system.

2004

Imago LEAP 3000 local-electrode atom probe installed.

2004

First PhD students able to be enrolled in Key Centre, through the Faculty of Science.

2004

Second Japan-Australia Workshop on Advanced Materials between the University of Sydney and Tohoku University, Japan, organised by the Key Centre. As part of this workshop, Professor Heinrich Rohrer (1986 Physics Nobel Laureate) gave a NANO Distinguished Lecture, "The Power and Magic of Small."

2005

Key Centre established as the University of Sydney's node of the new ARC Centre of Excellence in Design in Light Metals.

2006

NANO's nodes in NSW (the Key Centre and the EMU at UNSW) organised ACMM19, the 19th Australian Conference on Microscopy and Microanalysis, which was held at Randwick Racecourse in Sydney.

2006

First "Key Centre" PhD awarded.

2006

FEI Quanta 3D installed (focussed ion beam and environmental SEM).

2006

First EMU Future Focus Day -- a planning day for the entire unit.

2007

Establishment of the Australian Microscopy and Microanalysis Research Facility, successor to the NANO-MNRF, still headquartered in the Key Centre.

2007

Imago LEAP 3000X Si laser-assisted local-electrode atom probe installed.

2008

50th anniversary of establishment of the Electron Microscope Unit.

2009 The number of PhD students in the Key Centre exceeds 20 for the first time. Commissioning of three new TEMs: the JEOL 1400, the JEOL 2100 (cryo-tomography TEM), and the JEOL 2200FS, and installation of Australia's first X-ray nanotomography (‘Nano-XCT’) instrument.
2010s

2010

The University of Sydney introduces a new logo and brand, and renames the Electron Microscope Unit and Australian Key Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis as the ‘Australian Centre for Microscopy & Microanalysis’.