Design of Light Alloys

Three-Dimensional Imaging of Atoms in Advanced Titanium Alloys
The Ti6Al4V remains the most heavily used titanium alloy, especially because of its use in the aerospace industry. The alloy’s light weight, high tensile strength, good high temperature mechanical properties, good creep resistance, and important corrosion resistance offers Ti6Al4V as an important and valuable material. The LEAP is used to characterise the microstructure of this class of alloys.
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Advanced Characterisation of Zirconium Alloys for the Nuclear Industry
There remain major opportunities in the design of Zr alloys and this relates to the limited information available on solute-solute affinities and precipitation processes in these systems. We will apply atom probe and advanced electron microscopy to study these alloys, their response to heat treatment and the fundamentals of damage mechanisms.
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Structures and their Effect on Deformation Mechanisms in Nanostructured Materials Processed by Severe Plastic Deformation
A current challenge for material scientists is the development of light structural alloys that possess both high strength and high ductility. This combination of properties seems possible to attain in nanostructured materials. Consequently, the aim of this project is to use microscopy to develop new insights into the fundamental mechanisms of deformation and how these relate to nanostructure.
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Design of a Novel Al Alloy for High Toughness
Aluminium alloys are the most successful and widely used of the light alloys in modern engineering. With growing our understanding of role of how atomic clustering of solute atoms control second phase nucleation and precipitation as well as ultimate physical properties there are new opportunities for design of next-generation aluminium alloy technology. We aim to pioneer the design a new type of high-strength 7xxx alloy with novel properties based on a combination of clustering and precipitation strengthening. This is a core part of the research of the Centre of Excellence for Design in Light Metals.
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Design with Cluster Strengthening for Enhanced Strength and Elongation in Aluminium Alloys
Aluminium alloys are the most successful and widely used of the light alloys in modern engineering. Nevertheless, the prospect of designing the new alloys at the nanoscale offers the chance for further enhancements in property profiles, thereby creating entirely new applications. This work builds on our seminal work on the role of atomic clustering governing transformation pathways and on modifying engineering properties. The project aims to create a better understanding of the origins of cluster strengthening and to pioneer development of alloys which exhibit and exploit these effects. We will investigate and develop a physical model for cluster strengthening. We will also evaluate and optimise the engineering properties of cluster strengthened alloys. This is a core part of the research of the Centre of Excellence for Design in Light Metals.
Investigators: , (Monash University)