Dr Peter Ampt

Lecturer in Natural Resource Management, Department of Environmental Sciences

C81 - ATP - The Biomedical Building
The University of Sydney

Telephone +61 2 8627 1033
Fax +61 2 8627 1099

Biographical details

I have an MScAgr(research) and BScAgr for Sydney and a Dip. Ed. From UNE. I have returned to an academic career after many years as a high school teacher, education manager and participatory research consultant. I am in the final stages of a PhD by papers on the theme of the integration of conservation and production through the Institute of Environmental Studies at UNSW. For the past 6 years I have managed the Future of Australia's Threatened Ecosystems (FATE) Program which began at the Australian Museum, moved to UNSW and is now to Sydney University. It is the brainchild of Professor Mike Archer and aims to explore the sustainable use of native species and ecosystems to generate conservation benefits. FATE has concentrated on the management and commercial harvest of kangaroos including consumer attitudes to eating kangaroo meat, the opportunities and barriers to achieving conservation through sustainable use, the feasibility of the use on native mammals as pets and the potential of regional bio-energy strategies to drive improved natural resource management through native agroforestry. These projects have been funded by RIRDC and DAFF. I have been associated with the The Blue Mountains World Heritage Institute (BMWHI) since it was formed in 2004. It aims to identify, initiate and coordinate cross-disciplinary research to inform policy and management and to build collaboration between the range of stakeholders concerned with the Greater Blue Mountains World Heritage Area. The Dean Mark Adams is a member of the Board of the Institute and the Faculty contributes financially to the Institute each year along with other members which include Blue Mtns City Council, Hawkesbury Nepean CMA, NSW DECC (NPWS and RBG), Sydney Catchment Authority, UNSW, UTS and UWS. The Institute is an ideal vehicle for generating support for research that fits its research priorities. Of particular relevance to FAFNR is the management of the boundaries of the WHA and the generation of complementary development in the Sydney basin and on its western edge. Link for more information Blue Mountains World Heritage Institute. I currently co-supervise 5 PhD students and my teaching responsibilities include:

Management of the Faculty excursion program and its integration with the academic and professional experience programs. Coordination of AFNR 1001: The Rural Environment ¥ From 2011 I will coordinate AFNR1002: Climate and the Environment

Research interests

I am interested in participatory research that integrates conservation and production. The concepts of ecosystem services and adaptive management are important components of my work, and I like to work directly with landholders, especially those that are forging the way with practices that regenerate and sustainably use complex natural systems such as grasslands, shrub-lands and woodlands. These landholders actively adapt their management according to the uncertainty of the seasons and the market. There is a strong need for research strategies that take into account this adaptive approach. I am a member of the Steering Committee for the $4.2million ÔCommunities in LandscapesÕ project, CiL, which aims to work together to integrate conservation and production across Box-Gum Grassy Woodlands. Please click here to find the latest documents for CiL. I am coordinating the Sydney University components, which include managing the socio-cultural aspects of the project, conducting a benchmark study of landholder innovators who are already integrating conservation and production, coordinating cross property planning to achieve landscape scale management of biodiversity and setting up a demonstration site on the UNSW Wellington Field Station in central west NSW. I co-supervise 3 PhD students looking at different socio-cultural aspects of the project: monitoring the impact of the project on the community; investigating the experience of innovators; and the development of cross-property landholder groups to achieve landscape-scale benefits. I am an Australia 21 scholar (http://www.australia21.org.au/) working on the development of a national approach to ecosystem services including the development of a National Ecosystem Services Network. I have also worked closely with a number of Indigenous groups to help generate community benefit from involvement in conservation through use strategies.

Teaching and supervision

I currently co-supervise 5 PhD students and my teaching responsibilities include:

  • Management of the Faculty excursion program and its integration with the academic and professional experience programs.
  • Coordination of AFNR 1001: The Rural Environment
  • From 2011 I will coordinate AFNR1002: Climate and the Environment

Themes

Agronomy, horticulture and precision agriculture; Food Production, Quality and Safety

Selected grants

2013

  • Mining West African legacy agricultural research to enhance agricultural productivity; Odeh I, Tan D, Ampt P; Australian Agency for International Development (AUSAID)/Australian Leadership Awards Fellowships.

2012

  • Soil Carbon in Commercial Cropping Systems: Science to Best Agronomic Practice; Whelan B, Ampt P, Singh K; Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry (Federal)/Carbon Farming Futures Action on the Ground.

2010

  • Communities in Landscapes - Working together to integrate conservation and production across Box-Gum Woodlands; Ampt P; Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts (Federal)/Caring For Our Country.

Selected publications & creative works

Download citations: PDF RTF Endnote

Book Chapters

  • Ampt, P., Baumber, A. (2012). Applying the principles of conservation through sustainable use to the commercial kangaroo harvest in New South Wales, Australia. In John Merson, Rosie Cooney, Paul Brown (Eds.), Conservation in a Crowded World: Case studies from the Asia-Pacific, (pp. 235-255). Sydney: NewSouth Publishing.
  • Baumber, A., Merson, J., Diesendorf, M., Ampt, P. (2012). Revegetation, bioenergy and sustainable use in the New South Wales central west. In John Merson, Rosie Cooney, Paul Brown (Eds.), Conservation in a Crowded World: Case studies from the Asia-Pacific, (pp. 186-204). Sydney: NewSouth Publishing.
  • Cooney, R., Archer, M., Baumber, A., Ampt, P., Wilson, G., Smits, J., Webb, G. (2011). THINKK again: getting the facts straight on kangaroo harvesting and conservation. In P. Banks, D. Lunney, C. Dickman (Eds.), Science Under Siege. Australia: Royal Zoological Society of NSW.
  • Ampt, P., Baumber, A., Gepp, K. (2009). Adaptive Management of a Sustainable Wildlife Enterprise Trial in Australia's Barrier Ranges. In Catherine Allan, George H. Stankey (Eds.), Adaptive Environmental Management: A Practitioners Guide, (pp. 73-94). Germany / Australia: Springer / CSIRO Publishing.

Journals

  • Merson, J., Attwater, R., Ampt, P., Wildman, H., Chapple, R. (2010). The challenges to urban agriculture in the Sydney basin and lower Blue Mountains region of Australia. International Journal of Agricultural Sustainability, 8(1-2), 72-85. [More Information]
  • Baumber, A., Cooney, R., Ampt, P., Gepp, K. (2009). Kangaroos in the rangelands: opportunities for landholder collaboration. Rangeland Journal, 31(1), 161-167. [More Information]
  • Cooney, R., Baumber, A., Ampt, P., Wilson, G. (2009). Sharing Skippy: how can landholders be involved in kangaroo production in Australia? Rangeland Journal, 31(3), 283-292.
  • Booth, S., Powell, J., Ampt, P., Wildman, H., Aiken, J., Russell, J. (2008). The Penrith Lakes Natural Heritage and Biodiversity Conservation Master Plan: re-instating Cumberland Plain endangered ecological communities. Australasian Plant Conservation, 16(4), 14-15.
  • Ampt, P., Baumber, A. (2006). Building connections between kangaroos, commerce and conservation in the rangelands. Australian Zoologist, 33(3), 398-409.

Conferences

  • Cooney, R., Baumber, A., Ampt, P. (2008). A Co-op for Kangaroos: Involving Landholders in Kangaroo Management. 15th Biennial Australian Rangeland Society Conference ARS 2008, Australia: Australian Rangeland Society.
  • Ampt, P., Tongway, D., Baumber, A., Gepp, K. (2008). Land Managers and Landscape Function Analysis (LFA): Enhancing Adaptive Environmental Management While Monitoring Resource Condition in Western NSW. 15th Biennial Australian Rangeland Society Conference ARS 2008, Australia: Australian Rangeland Society.
  • Ampt, P. (2007). Systematic landscape change through agri-forestry: a collaborative approach. Policy Choices for Salinity Mitigation: Bridging the Disciplinary Divides 2007, Australia: Centre for Applied Economic Research, University of New South Wales.
  • Ampt, P., Baumber, A., Norris, K. (2006). Using Common Property Resource Approaches to Achieve Systematic Landscape Change. 11th Biennial Conference of the International Association for the Study of Common Property IASC 2006, United States: International Association for the Study of the Commons.

Research Reports

  • Ampt, P., Baumber, A. (2010). Building Cooperation and Collaboration in the Kangaroo Industry: Towards a role for landholders, RIRDC Publication No. 10/013, (pp. 1 - 138). Barton, ACT, Australia: Rural Industries Research and Development Corporation.
  • Merson, J., Attwater, R., Booth, S., Mulley, R., Ampt, P., Wildman, H., Nugent, M., Hooper, S., Campbell, M., Chapple, R. (2009). Urban Expansion and Sensitive Environments: Assessing the role of agri-industries as landscape buffers to the neighbouring Greater Blue Mountains World Heritage Area, RIRDC Publication No 09/025, (pp. 1 - 97). Barton, ACT, Australia: Rural Industries Research and Development Corporation.

2012

  • Ampt, P., Baumber, A. (2012). Applying the principles of conservation through sustainable use to the commercial kangaroo harvest in New South Wales, Australia. In John Merson, Rosie Cooney, Paul Brown (Eds.), Conservation in a Crowded World: Case studies from the Asia-Pacific, (pp. 235-255). Sydney: NewSouth Publishing.
  • Baumber, A., Merson, J., Diesendorf, M., Ampt, P. (2012). Revegetation, bioenergy and sustainable use in the New South Wales central west. In John Merson, Rosie Cooney, Paul Brown (Eds.), Conservation in a Crowded World: Case studies from the Asia-Pacific, (pp. 186-204). Sydney: NewSouth Publishing.

2011

  • Cooney, R., Archer, M., Baumber, A., Ampt, P., Wilson, G., Smits, J., Webb, G. (2011). THINKK again: getting the facts straight on kangaroo harvesting and conservation. In P. Banks, D. Lunney, C. Dickman (Eds.), Science Under Siege. Australia: Royal Zoological Society of NSW.

2010

  • Ampt, P., Baumber, A. (2010). Building Cooperation and Collaboration in the Kangaroo Industry: Towards a role for landholders, RIRDC Publication No. 10/013, (pp. 1 - 138). Barton, ACT, Australia: Rural Industries Research and Development Corporation.
  • Merson, J., Attwater, R., Ampt, P., Wildman, H., Chapple, R. (2010). The challenges to urban agriculture in the Sydney basin and lower Blue Mountains region of Australia. International Journal of Agricultural Sustainability, 8(1-2), 72-85. [More Information]

2009

  • Ampt, P., Baumber, A., Gepp, K. (2009). Adaptive Management of a Sustainable Wildlife Enterprise Trial in Australia's Barrier Ranges. In Catherine Allan, George H. Stankey (Eds.), Adaptive Environmental Management: A Practitioners Guide, (pp. 73-94). Germany / Australia: Springer / CSIRO Publishing.
  • Baumber, A., Cooney, R., Ampt, P., Gepp, K. (2009). Kangaroos in the rangelands: opportunities for landholder collaboration. Rangeland Journal, 31(1), 161-167. [More Information]
  • Cooney, R., Baumber, A., Ampt, P., Wilson, G. (2009). Sharing Skippy: how can landholders be involved in kangaroo production in Australia? Rangeland Journal, 31(3), 283-292.
  • Merson, J., Attwater, R., Booth, S., Mulley, R., Ampt, P., Wildman, H., Nugent, M., Hooper, S., Campbell, M., Chapple, R. (2009). Urban Expansion and Sensitive Environments: Assessing the role of agri-industries as landscape buffers to the neighbouring Greater Blue Mountains World Heritage Area, RIRDC Publication No 09/025, (pp. 1 - 97). Barton, ACT, Australia: Rural Industries Research and Development Corporation.

2008

  • Cooney, R., Baumber, A., Ampt, P. (2008). A Co-op for Kangaroos: Involving Landholders in Kangaroo Management. 15th Biennial Australian Rangeland Society Conference ARS 2008, Australia: Australian Rangeland Society.
  • Ampt, P., Tongway, D., Baumber, A., Gepp, K. (2008). Land Managers and Landscape Function Analysis (LFA): Enhancing Adaptive Environmental Management While Monitoring Resource Condition in Western NSW. 15th Biennial Australian Rangeland Society Conference ARS 2008, Australia: Australian Rangeland Society.
  • Booth, S., Powell, J., Ampt, P., Wildman, H., Aiken, J., Russell, J. (2008). The Penrith Lakes Natural Heritage and Biodiversity Conservation Master Plan: re-instating Cumberland Plain endangered ecological communities. Australasian Plant Conservation, 16(4), 14-15.

2007

  • Ampt, P. (2007). Systematic landscape change through agri-forestry: a collaborative approach. Policy Choices for Salinity Mitigation: Bridging the Disciplinary Divides 2007, Australia: Centre for Applied Economic Research, University of New South Wales.

2006

  • Ampt, P., Baumber, A. (2006). Building connections between kangaroos, commerce and conservation in the rangelands. Australian Zoologist, 33(3), 398-409.
  • Ampt, P., Baumber, A., Norris, K. (2006). Using Common Property Resource Approaches to Achieve Systematic Landscape Change. 11th Biennial Conference of the International Association for the Study of Common Property IASC 2006, United States: International Association for the Study of the Commons.

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