Dr Robert Simpson

Research Fellow, Department of Environmental Sciences

C02F - Centre for Carbon, Water and Food
The University of Sydney

Telephone +61 2 9351 8840
Fax +61 2 8627 1099

Website Dargo High Plains

Biographical details

Robert Simpson is a Research Fellow of Biosphere-Atmosphere Interaction in the Department of Environmental Sciences, specializing in biometeorology.His research interests centre on the development and use of both aerodynamic (eddy covariance/eddy gradient) and chamber techniques to quantify biogenic and biotrophic greenhouse gas fluxes at scales ranging from plot to landscape.

Robert is trained as an Agricultural Scientist majoring in Rangeland Ecology and Ruminant Nutrition. It was during his Ph.D. at the University of Melbourne that he began researching ecophysiological drivers of greenhouse gas fluxes in the Australian High Country.

Upon completion of his degree, Robert moved to Sydney to commence work at the University of New South Wales as a Post-Doctoral Research Fellow. Robert moved to the University of Sydney in 2009 to take up his current position.

Research interests

Robert’s research interests span both native and agro-ecosystems. Primarily, Robert’s objective is to provide field-based quantitative measures (i.e. real data) of greenhouse gas fluxes. These data are used for the purposes of constraining regional models, elucidating ecophysiological drivers of the carbon, nitrogen and water cycles and underpinning management and decision-making processes for land managers. To this end, Robert maintains two permanent flux stations in sub-alpine grasslands. These data feed into both national (http://www.ozflux.org.au/index.html; http://www.n2o.net.au/) and international (http://fluxnet.ornl.gov/) flux networks.

Robert has more recently been active building significant research capacity for the Faculty, principally through the conception, development, construction and deployment of the University of Sydney Terrestrial and Atmospheric Research (USTAR) Platforms. These platforms are the first flux stations purpose built to be portable and rapidly deployable into most native and afro-ecosystems. Together with the use of emerging analytical instrumentation, the USTAR platforms form the cornerstone of the Faculty’s ability to quantify landscape scale fluxes of all major greenhouse gases.

Themes

Plant and crop physiology; Food Security and Supply

Selected publications

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Journals

  • Pfautsch, S., Keitel, C., Turnbull, T., Braimbridge, M., Wright, T., Simpson, R., O'Brien, J., Adams, M. (2011). Diurnal patterns of water use in Eucalyptus victrix indicate pronounced desiccation–rehydration cycles despite unlimited water supply. Tree Physiology, 31(10), 1041-1051. [More Information]
  • Huber, E., Bell, T., Simpson, R., Adams, M. (2011). Relationships among microclimate, edaphic conditions, vegetation distribution and soil nitrogen dynamics on the Bogong High Plains, Australia. Austral Ecology: a journal of ecology in the Southern Hemisphere, 36(2), 142-152.
  • Huber, E., Bell, T., Simpson, R., Adams, M. (2010). Relationships among microclimate, edaphic conditions, vegetation distribution and soil nitrogen dynamics on the Bogong High Plains, Australia. Austral Ecology: a journal of ecology in the Southern Hemisphere, 36(2), 142-152. [More Information]

2011

  • Pfautsch, S., Keitel, C., Turnbull, T., Braimbridge, M., Wright, T., Simpson, R., O'Brien, J., Adams, M. (2011). Diurnal patterns of water use in Eucalyptus victrix indicate pronounced desiccation–rehydration cycles despite unlimited water supply. Tree Physiology, 31(10), 1041-1051. [More Information]
  • Huber, E., Bell, T., Simpson, R., Adams, M. (2011). Relationships among microclimate, edaphic conditions, vegetation distribution and soil nitrogen dynamics on the Bogong High Plains, Australia. Austral Ecology: a journal of ecology in the Southern Hemisphere, 36(2), 142-152.

2010

  • Huber, E., Bell, T., Simpson, R., Adams, M. (2010). Relationships among microclimate, edaphic conditions, vegetation distribution and soil nitrogen dynamics on the Bogong High Plains, Australia. Austral Ecology: a journal of ecology in the Southern Hemisphere, 36(2), 142-152. [More Information]

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