Dr Uttam Sharma

C81 - ATP - The Biomedical Building
The University of Sydney

Telephone Ph: +61 2 862 71113
Fax Fax: +61 2 862 71099

Biographical details

Dr. Sharma completed his Ph.D. in Applied Economics from the University of Minnesota (USA) in January 2012. He holds a Masters degree in Economics from the University of Maryland (USA) and a Bachelors degree from Brandeis University (USA). He has earlier done short-term consulting work for the World Bank, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFRPI), International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) and UNDP (Nepal). In 2010, he was a visiting instructor in Economics at Carleton College, USA teaching Principles of Microeconomics and Economics of Education.

Research interests

Dr. Sharma’s research interests are in the field of development economics, program evaluation, applied microeconomics, and economics of education. As impact evaluation specialist in Nigeria and Nepal, he has extensive field experience in these two countries. His current research involves evaluating programs related to agriculture and education, and exploring the impact of competition in microfinance market in Bangladesh.

Themes

Agricultural and Resource Economics

Selected publications

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Journals

  • Sharma, U. (2013). Review of Food Policy for Developing Countries: The Role of Government in Global, National, and Local Food Systems. Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, 57(2), 298-300. [More Information]

Conferences

  • Chowdhury, S., Rammohan, A., Sharma, U. (2013). Income Inequality and Crime in rural Indonesia. Econometric Society Australasian Meeting 2013 (ESAM 2013), Sydney, Australia: The Econometric Society.
  • Sharma, U. (2012). Can Computers Increase Human Capital in Developing Countries? An Evaluation of Nepal's One Laptop per Child Program. 8th Australasian Development Economics Workshop (ADEW 2012), Melbourne: Monash Centre for Development Economics.
  • Davila, R., Gondwe, D., McCarthy, A., Kirdruang, P., Sharma, U. (2012). The Census Microdata Wealth Index: An Application to Predict Education Outcomes in Developing Countries. 2nd Asian Population Association Conference, Bangkok: Asian Population Association Conference.
  • Hall, P., Sharma, U., Sarkar, S. (2012). The Relationship between Household Structure and Migration in Southeast Asia: Evidence from Global IPUMS Harmonized Census Data. 2nd Asian Population Association Conference, Bangkok: Asian Population Association Conference.
  • Sharma, U. (2009). Private and Public Schools: A Comparative Perspective. 10th UKFIET International Conference on Education and Development.

2013

  • Chowdhury, S., Rammohan, A., Sharma, U. (2013). Income Inequality and Crime in rural Indonesia. Econometric Society Australasian Meeting 2013 (ESAM 2013), Sydney, Australia: The Econometric Society.
  • Sharma, U. (2013). Review of Food Policy for Developing Countries: The Role of Government in Global, National, and Local Food Systems. Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, 57(2), 298-300. [More Information]

2012

  • Sharma, U. (2012). Can Computers Increase Human Capital in Developing Countries? An Evaluation of Nepal's One Laptop per Child Program. 8th Australasian Development Economics Workshop (ADEW 2012), Melbourne: Monash Centre for Development Economics.
  • Davila, R., Gondwe, D., McCarthy, A., Kirdruang, P., Sharma, U. (2012). The Census Microdata Wealth Index: An Application to Predict Education Outcomes in Developing Countries. 2nd Asian Population Association Conference, Bangkok: Asian Population Association Conference.
  • Hall, P., Sharma, U., Sarkar, S. (2012). The Relationship between Household Structure and Migration in Southeast Asia: Evidence from Global IPUMS Harmonized Census Data. 2nd Asian Population Association Conference, Bangkok: Asian Population Association Conference.

2009

  • Sharma, U. (2009). Private and Public Schools: A Comparative Perspective. 10th UKFIET International Conference on Education and Development.

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