sy CPD - Architecture, Design and Planning - The University of Sydney

Continuing Professional Development

An innovative CPD program that caters to busy professionals is now offered by the Faculty of Architecture, Design & Planning, University of Sydney. You can undertake a single unit of study without assessment and claim your CPD points at a reduced rate. The 5-day courses provide a valuable opportunity for property sector professionals and students to be updated on career-related skills and the latest developments in these fast-changing fields.

Our units of study span a range of specialist areas from Building Information Modeling (BIM) and Intelligent Building Controls, to Building Economics – all vital elements of a high performing building. Many of theses units are offered for the first time in Australia at postgraduate level.

Please note that these CPD credits will not count towards a postgraduate award unless you choose to enroll as a part-time or full-time student in which case you will be required to fulfill the appropriate assessment tasks.

There are limited places in some of the units and they will be allocated on first come, first served basis.

Need to know more?

Contact the Student Administration Centre (arch.sac@sydney.edu.au).

Topics offered at the postgraduate level:

DESC9169 - Daylight in Buildings

Program Director: Richard de Dear

Key Lecturer: Haico Schepers (Arup)

Session: Semester 2

Classes: 5 days intensive 9am-5pm

Dates: TBA 2016

Cost: CPD Reduced Rate $2,500

Daylight can be used in buildings to reduce the energy spent on electric lighting and create aesthetically appealing interiors. Design decisions that affect the success of daylighting in a building span every phase of the design process, from site selection to the application of interior finishes. This unit discusses the role of daylight in indoor illuminated environments. Calculations to predict the quantity and distribution of daylight in spaces and to predict the effects of shading devices are covered. Students learn about the local and global variables that influence daylight availability, recognize the challenges and opportunities with daylight in interior spaces, and the appropriate use of day lighting technologies. Modelling tools (Radiance based) will be used in order to assess the efficacy of selected daylight strategies.

DESC9201 - Indoor Environmental Quality (IEQ)

Program Director: Prof Richard de Dear

Unit Co-ordinator: Prof Richard de Dear

Session: Semester 2

Classes: 5 days, 9am-5pm

Dates: Fridays: 29 Jul, 12 Aug, 2, 9 & 16 Sep (TBC)

Exam: Thur 13 Oct. 5.30pm-8pm

Cost: CPD Reduced Rate $2,500

Humans' thermal, visual, auditory and olfactory senses determine the perceived quality of a built environment. This unit analyses built environments in context of these human factors. This unit relates human experience of buildings to the main dimensions of Indoor Environmental Quality (IEQ): thermal, acoustic, lighting and indoor pollution. This understanding of human comfort perceptions is contextualised by an understanding of the various approaches to the evaluation of built environmental performance. You will study post-occupancy evaluation tools and workplace productivity metrics. Regulations from Australia and abroad will be explored to understand their impact on acoustics, thermal comfort, lighting, indoor air quality and ventilation. The unit also pays particular attention to sustainability rating tools from around the world, including GreenStar, NABERS, LEED and BREEAM. This unit gives students extensive hands-on experience in laboratory- and field-based methods of IEQ research and building diagnostics. A recurring theme will be instrumental measurements of indoor environments, and how they can be analysed in relation to perceptual and behavioral data collected from occupants of those environments.

DESC9067 - Mechanical Services

Program Director: Prof Richard de Dear

Unit Co-ordinator: Ashak Nathwani

Key Presenters: Dr Shailja Chandra, Jonathan Clarke (NDY), Richard Pickering (NDY), Neil Caswell (ECS), P C Thomas

Session: Semester 2

Classes: 5 days, 9am-5pm

Room: 481, Wilkinson Building

Dates: 10 & 31 Aug, 1, 17 & 18 Sep (TBC)

Cost: CPD Reduced Rate $2,500

This unit reviews the need for and application of Mechanical Services in the built environment - in particular commercial buildings. Mechanical Services are responsible for significant portion of energy and water consumption in buildings. Thus they have become important components of most modern building complexes, with a strong influence on other services and the architecture. This unit provides an introduction to these services by experienced presenters, including from the industry, for recent graduates in mechanical engineering. It also provides an understanding of fundamental principles and practice for those from backgrounds other than mechanical engineering. Students will acquire skills in appreciation of impact of mechanical services on the environment, including recent mandatory regulations, together with estimating ventilation, cooling and heating requirements, design of simple ventilation, air conditioning and smoke hazard management systems, combined with an overview of water, refrigerant, ducted systems, with applicable equipment, energy, noise, human comfort, air quality criteria. Principles of heat transfer and fluid flow are applied to applications of mechanical ventilation, air conditioning and smoke hazard management, to satisfy regulations and standards, occupant and community expectations. The practical basis of the program leads to a design assignment involving selecting equipment and systems to provide mechanical services in a building.

DESC9196 - Building Services

Program Director: Ashak Nathwani

Unit Co-ordinator: Ashak Nathwani

Key Presenter: John Roche

Session: Semester 2

Classes: 5 days, 9am-5pm

Dates: 15, 21, 22 Aug, 23 Sep & 10 Oct

Cost: CPD Reduced Rate $2,500

Technological advances have transformed virtually every aspect of building services including vertical transportation, fire detection and protection, hydraulics and plumbing, heating ventilation and air conditioning, electrical and lighting, security and data networking. This unit develops a critical understanding of the principles of selection, operation and management of these service systems in buildings of larger-than-domestic scale. Upon completion of the unit, students will be able to contribute competently to the decision-making processes related to these systems, and to be aware of the implications of these decisions upon both building design and operational performance. Students will also gain an understanding of the fundamentals of building services functioning, technologies currently available, along with the design and performance implications of competing solutions. Performance metrics to be discussed include energy consumption, space requirements, accessibility for maintenance, and impacts on adjacent floors.

DESC9074 - Project Management

Program Director: Prof Richard de Dear

Unit Co-ordinator: Ashak Nathwani

Session: Semester 2

Classes: 5 days, 9am-5pm

Dates: 8, 9, 29, 30 Aug & 11 Oct

Cost: CPD Reduced Rate $2,500

Project Management is specific form of establishing, programming, and coordinating an activity having a specific start point and end point. This body of knowledge - as for example in the Project Management Book of Knowledge (PMBOK) - needs to be understood in general terms. Initially project managers must identify and define the services that are needed, (scope) and that their employers are willing to endorse. The activities requiring to be carried out need to be sorted and sequenced; the materials, labour and plant required need to be estimated and procured. Projects involve the management of information and communications. This unit will develop the student's ability to ascertain and document the scope of a project, schedule a programme, and understand the difficulties in directing it. This unit approaches the profession of Project Management as a cooperative undertaking rather than adversarial. It promotes the adoption of soft-skills rather than forceful command and supervision.

DESC9106 - Design Thinking

Program Director: Dr Lian Loke

Key Presenters: Dr Baki Kocaballi, Claudia Nunez-Pacheco

Session: Semester 1 & 2

Classes: Tuesday (Semester 1) / Wednesday (Semester 2) evenings, Time 6-9pm, Lecture 1hr/wk, Tutorial 2hrs/wk

Cost: CPD Reduced Rate $2,500

This unit of study provides an overview of a human-centred approach to the design of products and systems. It introduces students to design thinking and how it can be productively applied to different design situations. The theoretical concepts, methods and tools for the key stages of interaction design are covered including user research, ideation, prototyping and user evaluation. It provides students with the principles, processes and tools for working collaboratively on design projects in studio. The cognitive processes of individual designers are also explored. Students learn to build empathy with users, identify and reframe the problem space, develop value-driven design concepts and persuasively communicate design proposals with an emphasis on the user experience through visual storytelling.

DESC9103 - Design Programming

Program Director: Dr Lian Loke

Unit Co-ordinator: Nathaniel Fay

Key Presenter: Scott Simon

Session: Semester 1 & 2

Classes: Friday mornings, Time 10am-1pm, Tutorial 3hrs/wk

Cost: CPD Reduced Rate $2,500

This unit aims to teach students an understanding of the stages involved in the development of software for design; skills in the design and implementation of software for design tasks and in the development of software as design tools. On the successful completion of this unit of study, students will have demonstrated through individual and group programming assignments: skills in using software tools to build interactive, visual design applications; knowledge of object-oriented programming concepts; implementation techniques such as editing, using libraries, and compilation and runtime environments; knowledge of programming language concepts including: classes, methods, object creation, instance and local variables, primitive and object types, simple I/O, and control flow; knowledge of software design and development processes including analysis of requirements, design of data-structures, functions and classes, software development lifecycles, and managing software projects. This unit is a foundational core unit in the Master of Interaction Design and Electronic Arts program.

DESC9105 - Interface Design

Program Director: Dr Lian Loke

Key Presenter: Nikash Singh

Session: Semester 1 & 2

Classes: Friday afternoon, Time 2-5pm Lecture 1hr/wk, Tutorial 2hrs/wk

Cost: CPD Reduced Rate $2,500

This unit introduces students to the fundamentals of user interface design. Interface design is an important element of a human-centred design approach to the development of interactive computational systems. Students will learn about industry standard user interface design and usability principles and guidelines, based in visual design theory and visual perception. They will acquire practical knowledge through the application of tools and techniques for designing and evaluating user interfaces for web and mobile products. The unit increases awareness of good and bad design through observation and evaluation of existing technology, and develops appreciation of visual design principles and their impact on the user experience of interactive products. The knowledge and skills developed in this unit will equip students with the essential capabilities for working in the interaction design and user experience profession. This unit is a foundational core unit in the Master of Interaction Design and Electronic Arts program.