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Lighting equipment
Research_

Lighting

The future of illuminating architecture
We are researching the application of light and the spectral characteristics of illumination to improve architectural spaces, human interactions with light, and the energy efficiency of lighting.

Our research program concentrates on the ways and environments in which light can be applied. We are developing ideas about how future technologies can be leveraged to maximise the use of light in a wide variety of contexts and settings. We question current lighting design practices to develop innovative, sometimes fundamentally new, ways of using lighting in architectural spaces.

Our experiments investigate the impacts of these applications on the experience of architecture and on energy consumption. Our projects revolve around three research focus areas: the spectrum of illumination, the spatial distribution of light, and user control of lighting.

 

 

Current projects

Lab members: Associate Professor Wendy Davis, Dr Dorukalp Durmus, Mariana Papa

The spectral output of a light source has profound impact on both the colour quality and energy efficiency of the resulting illumination. Traditionally, white light has been used to illuminate objects of all colours. The aim of our research is to investigate a radical new approach to lighting that could substantially reduce the energy wasted by absorption.

Lab members: Associate Professor Wendy Davis, Jo Elliott

Lighting products that use newer technologies can emit virtually any pattern of light throughout architectural spaces. However, fundamental research is needed to determine how to best capitalise on this. We are investigating the relationships between the spatial distribution of light and visual interest, as well as the appearance of the size of architectural spaces. 

Lab members: Associate Professor Wendy Davis, Wenye Hu

Many new lighting technologies are controlled by digital signals that customise a wide range of attributes (eg, colour, brightness, spatial distribution). Research is needed to understand how people conceive these light properties and what variables effect interaction with illumination. We are currently investigating the effect of control resolution (the smallest change possible) on user efficacy, accuracy, and satisfaction, as well as energy consumption.

Engagement

We welcome opportunities to collaborate with community groups, businesses, government and other external parties, through consultancy or formally funded research.

Our researchers

 

Publications

  • Kassakian, J., Hu, E., Black, I., Clanton, N., Davis, W., Ettenberg, M., Hakkarainen, P., Narendran, N., Savitz, M., Spencer, M., et al (2017). Assessment of Solid-State Lighting, Phase Two. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.
  • Hu, W., Davis, W. (2017). Development and evaluation of colour control interfaces for LED lighting. Optics Express, 25(8), A346-A360.
  • Durmus, D., Davis, W. (2017). Object color naturalness and attractiveness with spectrally optimized illumination. Optics Express, 25(11), 12839-12850.
  • Hu, W., Davis, W. (2017). The effect of control resolution on the usability of color-tunable LED lighting systems. Optical Nanostructures and Advanced Materials for Photovoltaics, PV 2017, Washington, DC: OSA - The Optical Society.
  • Durmus, D., Davis, W. (2016). Customisation of Spectral Power Distribution. Lighting Magazine, Vol 36 Issue 2.
  • Abdalla, D., Duis, A., Durmus, D., Davis, W. (2016). Customization of light source spectrum to minimize light absorbed by artwork. CIE Lighting Quality and Energy Efficiency Conference 2016, Melbourne: Commission Internationale de L'Eclairage.
    Robinson, K., Hu, W., Easton, B., Davis, W. (2016). Detection of luminance differences across architectural spaces. CIE Lighting Quality and Energy Efficiency Conference 2016, Melbourne: Commission Internationale de L'Eclairage.
  • Hu, W., Davis, W. (2016). Dimming curve based on the detectability and acceptability of illuminance differences. Optics Express, 24(10), A885-A897.
  • Durmus, D., Davis, W. (2016). Illuminating objects with absorption-minimizing spectra. Illuminating Engineering Society (IES) 2016 Annual Conference, Orlando: The Illuminating Engineering Society of North America.
  • Hu, W., Davis, W. (2016). Luminance resolution of lighting control systems: usability and energy conservation. CIE Lighting Quality and Energy Efficiency Conference 2016, Melbourne: Commission Internationale de L'Eclairage.
  • Durmus, D., Davis, W. (2015). Absorption-Minimizing Spectral Power Distributions. Light, Energy and the Environment 2015, Washington, DC, USA: OSA (Optical Society America).
  • Durmus, D., Davis, W. (2015). Colour difference and energy consumption of absorption-minimizing spectral power distributions. Asia-Pacific Lighting Systems Workshop 2015, Sydney: Asia-Pacific Lighting Systems Workshop 2015.
  • Davis, W. (2015). History of Color Metrics. In Robert Karlicek, Ching-Cherng Sun, Georges Zissis, Ruiqing Ma (Eds.), Handbook of Advanced Lighting Technology, (pp. 1-11). Switzerland: Springer.
  • Durmus, D., Davis, W. (2015). Optimising light source spectrum for object reflectance. Optics Express, 23(11), A456-A464.
  • Hu, W., Davis, W. (2015). Usability of High Resolution Lighting Control Systems. Asia-Pacific Lighting Systems Workshop 2015, Sydney: Asia-Pacific Lighting Systems Workshop 2015.
  • Durmus, D., Davis, W. (2014). Optimising Light Source Spectrum For Object Reflectance. Light, Energy and the Environment 2014 Congress, Canberra: The Optical Society.
  • Kassakian, J., Azevedo, I., Clanton, N., Davis, W., DeCotis, P., DenBaars, S., Ettenberg, M., Forrest, S., Hakkarainen, P., Hu, E., et al (2013). Assessment of Advance Solid-State Lighting. Washington, D.C: The National Academies Press.
  • Davis, W., Tomitsch, M. (2012). Chromapollination. In: Vivid Sydney. Destination NSW. West Circular Quay, Sydney, Australia.