2009 Seminars

Naval Developments in the Asia-Pacific Region

27th Oct 2009 - 01:00pm
Speaker: Dr Chris Rahman, Senior Research Fellow Australian National Centre for Ocean Resources and Security (ANCORS), University of Wollongong
Description:

The Asia-Pacific region is predominately a maritime one, and many of the most pressing security issues have a strong maritime dimension - from non-military and unconventional threats to great power strategic competition. In recent times, the intensity of maritime disputes and the character of naval developments are creating a potentially more dangerous environment. This seminar will examine the main drivers of naval modernisation, the character of that modernisation, and some of the operational implications. Particular emphasis will be given to the proliferation of submarines, major surface combatants, anti-ship and land-attack cruise missiles, and China's continued development of an anti-ship ballistic missile capability. The seminar will also survey recent incidents at sea, including that involving the USNS Impeccable and Chinese vessels in the South China Sea.

Venue: Darlington Centre Boardroom (opposite the Darlington Centre in the Institute Building)

The Defence of Australia: What Does it Mean Today?

6th Oct 2009 - 01:00pm
Speaker: The Hon Robert Hill
Description:

The Defence White Paper 2009 states, "our most basic strategic interest remains the defence of Australia against direct armed attack…this means we have a fundamental interest in controlling the air sea approaches to our continent". Should this still be the first strategic goal of Australia's defence policy? If so, do we or are we likely to have the capability to meet this responsibility? Hill will discuss this and other issues relating to Australian defence policy based upon his wide experience serving as Minster for Defence from 2002-2006.

Venue: Darlington Centre Boardroom (opposite the Darlington Centre in the Institute Building)

A New Aggressive Russia?

1st Sep 2009 - 01:00pm
Speaker: Professor Graeme Gill, Professor of Government and Public Administration The University of Sydney
Description:

Since 2000, the perception has grown that Russia has embarked on a new, more aggressive foreign policy. Strained relations with the US and NATO, the conflict with Georgia and the disruption of gas supplies to Ukraine and the EU are all pointed to as evidence for this. But is this a useful way of making sense of Russian's international stance? Has Russia under Putin and now Medvedev become more aggressive than it was under Yeltsin? This talk will explore this question, and argue that such an interpretation is not very helpful.

Venue: Darlington Centre Boardroom (opposite the Darlington Centre in the Institute Building)

Defending Australia in the Asia Pacific Century - the 2009 Defence White Paper

4th Aug 2009 - 01:00pm
Speaker: Mr Michael Pezzullo, Deputy Secretary Strategy Department of Defence and principal author of the 2009 Defence White Paper
Description:

The 2009 Defence White Paper, Defending Australia in the Asia Pacific Century: Force 2030, represents a seminal moment in Australian defence policy and national security. This new White Paper provides the first comprehensive Defence policy statement aimed squarely at addressing the challenges of the 21st century. The White Paper asks and answers some fundamental questions about what the international system will look like in two to three decades. It addresses the impacts that a changed global security order might have on the use of force, and what impacts these changes will have on the role of our Defence forces into that future. Mr Pezzullo will discuss the Defence White Paper, its development and outcomes, as well as providing a unique perspective on national security, public policy development and military strategy.

Venue: Darlington Centre Boardroom (opposite the Darlington Centre in the Institute Building)

Energy Resources: Geopolitics, Access and Diplomacy

2nd Jun 2009 - 01:00pm
Speaker: Dr Ligia Noronha, Director, Resources and Global Security The Energy and Resources Institute, India
Description:

Dr Noronha will discuss how the race to secure energy resources is sparking a resurgence of geopolitics. She will explore the new resource diplomacy that emerging economies such as India are engaged in and how these policies are impacting the international arena.

The emergence of India and China and the rising demand for natural resources over the last decade, and especially since 2003, have sparked a resurgence of global resource geopolitics. The key resources that attract attention are oil, natural gas, coal, and even atmospheric space. The presentation will explore the new resource diplomacy that emerging economies such as India are engaged in, and how these policies are being perceived internationally. With fossil fuel resources perceived to be in short supply, these countries' strategies have been described in terms of 'resource hunger', competition, conflict, and even irresponsibility. This presentation will explore this view, and argue that such interpretations are narrowly conceived.

Venue: Darlington Centre Boardroom (opposite the Darlington Centre in the Institute Building)

Rewriting the Narrative: An Integrated Strategy for Counter-radicalisation

19th May 2009 - 01:00pm
Speaker: Dr Matthew Levitt, Director Stein Program on Counterterrorism and Intelligence, The Washington Institute for Near East Policy
Description:

As the military fight to disrupt the activities of al-Qaeda and its affiliates continues on multiple fronts, the United States government has slowly realised that military force alone cannot defeat radical Islamist extremism. Despite the growing consensus regarding the importance of countering the ideology that drives extremist violence, developing a strategy to counter extremism and empower mainstream alternatives has proven challenging. Dr Matthew Levitt is co-author of the report Rewriting the Narrative: An Integrated Strategy for Counterradicalization. Join us as he discusses the report's findings and recommendations on issues such as democracy promotion, political reform, public diplomacy and counter-radicalisation.

Venue: Darlington Centre Boardroom (opposite the Darlington Centre in the Institute Building)

India's Look East Policy: Entering the Second Phase

12th May 2009 - 01:00pm
Speaker: Dr Pankaj Jha, Associate Fellow Institute for Defence Studies and Analyses (New Delhi)
Description:

With the rise of India and the effects of financial crisis trickling down to Asia, the global economic order is being reconfigured. India has begun to revisit its relationship with its Asian neighbours, initiating a policy of more intensive diplomacy, but it remains apprehensive of China's rise both militarily and economically. Southeast Asia is a major pivot point in India's bid to assert its sphere of influence in Asia, and its interplay with China can be seen in the region's multilateral forums. Indian engagement in the region has traditionally been muted, but with intensive efforts underway on issues such as free trade, counter-terrorism, security in the Malacca Straights and regional diasporas, new definitions of engagement are being written. Dr Jha will discuss India's Look East policy and the role of Southeast Asia in its relations with China.

Venue: Darlington Centre Boardroom (opposite the Darlington Centre in the Institute Building)

Swine Influenza: Political Challenges and Ethical Dilemmas

7th May 2009 - 01:00pm
Speaker: Dr Christian Enemark, Lecturer Centre for International Security Studies and Co-Director, National Centre for Biosecurity
Description:

According to the World Health Organization, the A/H1N1 swine influenza outbreak originating in Mexico in April 2009 has high potential to reach pandemic proportions. The situation is evolving rapidly and it is uncertain whether a likely influenza pandemic will be mild or severe. This seminar provides an update on national and international responses to swine flu. Dr Enemark will discuss the challenges that a pandemic poses for governments, in particular the need to balance public health, economic and human rights imperatives.

Venue: Darlington Centre Boardroom (opposite the Darlington Centre in the Institute Building)

Australia's Modern Wars - Are We Capable of Learning?

28th Apr 2009 - 01:00pm
Speaker: Jim Molan, AO DSC, Major General (Ret'd)
Description:

During his long and distinguished career in the Australian Army, Major General Jim Molan served in Papua New Guinea, Indonesia, East Timor, Malaysia, Germany, the US, and as commander of the evacuation force from the Solomon Islands in 2000 and Chief of Operations in Iraq. General Molan will discuss the lessons he has learned about modern warfare and 21st Century urban counter-insurgency. These lessons transcend individual views on issues such as whether Iraq was 'right', Afghanistan is 'winnable', or you believe in strategic concepts such as 'forward defence'. Rather, they concern the effectiveness of our defence force now and in an uncertain future, and whether Australia has the capacity to learn from Iraq, and apply those lessons in Afghanistan and beyond.

Venue: Darlington Centre Boardroom (opposite the Darlington Centre in the Institute Building)

What Obama's America will mean for the world

7th Apr 2009 - 01:00pm
Speaker: Professor Geoffrey Garrett, CEO US Studies Centre, The University of Sydney
Description:

Dragged down by the US, the world economy is facing its deepest crisis in at least a generation. Based on the dire experience of the 1930s, a downward spiral of protectionism, nationalism and domestic and international political instability seems increasingly likely. The US may not be as powerful as it seemed when George Bush was elected in 2000. Nonetheless, the US under Barack Obama will still have a disproportionate impact on the prospects for averting these disastrous outcomes. In the longer run, however, the GFC will only hasten the reality of a declining US and its replacement by a dysfunctional global system - multipolarity without multilateralism.

Venue: Darlington Centre Boardroom (opposite the Darlington Centre in the Institute Building)

Defending Australia and the New National Security Paradigm

17th Mar 2009 - 01:00pm
Speaker: Professor Alan Dupont, Director CISS
Description:

National security and defence of the realm from the predations of other states were once seen as coterminous. No longer. The Rudd Government released Australia's first ever National Security Statement in December 2008, a document which makes abundantly clear that an important shift in thinking has taken place. Please join us as Professor Dupont discusses the new national security paradigm and the impact is already having on the way in which defence and national security policy are conducted and articulated.

Venue: Darlington Centre Boardroom (opposite the Darlington Centre in the Institute Building)