Units of Study

CISS6010 - Research Essay 2

Semester 1, 2013  |  Credit Points: 6

Coordinator: James Reilly

Description

This unit is the second of a two-part, supervised dissertation of 10000 -12000 words to be taken in conjunction with CISS6009 Research Essay 1. Entry into this unit is by permission only and requires the completion of a minimum of 4 units with an average of 75%, and upon the availability of a CISS supervisor for the proposed topic.

Assessments

1x10000-12000 research essay (100%)

Classes

4x1-2hr supervision meetings weeks 2, 4, 6 and 8, or equivalent hours as arranged by supervisor and student.

Prerequisites

Completion of a minimum of 4 units with an average of 75%

Corequisites

CISS6009

Additional Information

Entry into this unit is by permission only.

The information displayed above is indicative only as online information is subject to change without notice. The Faculty Handbook and the University of Sydney Calendar are the official legal source of information relating to study at the University of Sydney

Unit Descriptions

Core Units

Table A Electives

Table B Electives

Core Units

CISS6001 New Security Challenges

This unit considers the evolving nature of security in the context of global politics. It focuses on non-military challenges to security while acknowledging the relationships between these and traditional security concerns. Among the topics considered are: international law and security; the privatisation of security; economics and security; energy resources; environmental degradation; the burden of infectious diseases; population dynamics; gender and age perspectives on security; the dilemmas of fragile and failing states; transnational organised crime; and new modes of warfare. The overall objective of the unit is to engage with issues and arguments that challenge how security is traditionally understood. Teaching and learning take place via a combination of lectures, student-led seminars, independent research, debates and case studies.

In 2013, this unit will be taught in Semester 2. Further details here.

CISS6002 Strategy & Security in the Asia-Pacific

This unit focuses on the strategic dynamics of the Asia-Pacific region and the security challenges it faces. It combines a grounding in International Relations theory, and concepts of strategy and security, with a series of dedicated country profiles. Issues such as great power rivalry, nuclear proliferation, terrorism, piracy, and environmental degradation are all considered. The overall objective of the unit is to engage with issues and arguments about strategy and security that relate specifically to the Asia-Pacific region. Teaching and learning take place via a combination of lectures, student-led seminars, and independent research.

In 2013, this unit will be taught in Semester 1. Further details here.

CISS6006 Statebuilding and Fragile States

This unit examines the characteristics of fragile and failed states, and the nature of donor and international community engagement with these states. It will explore the international community's gradual acceptance of the norms of humanitarian intervention and post-conflict reconstruction to assist civilians affected by civil war, insurgencies, state repression, profound state weakness and state collapse. The unit will expand upon the theoretical literature with evidence from case studies on Africa, the Middle East, South/Central Asia and the Asia-Pacific.

In 2013, this unit will be taught in Semester 2. Further details here.

GOVT6119 International Security

This unit reviews developments in international security since before World War l, to recent events like September 11 and its aftermath. The principal focus is on developments since the end of the Cold War and the collapse of Communism. The unit takes account of traditional notions about the causes of war and the conditions of peace, as well as changes in the structure and process of contemporary international relations.

In 2013, this unit will be taught in Semesters 1 and 2. Further details here.

Table A Electives

CISS6003 Business and Security

This unit examines the importance of security in business through assessing contemporary security challenges and what 'security' comprises in a business context. Topics include: fraud and corruption, cybercrime, industrial espionage, corporate liability, business and organised crime links, preparedness for terrorism, business continuity during infectious disease outbreaks, the international arms trade, and private military corporations. The unit includes management sessions which focus on risk and crisis management, and planning for effective security. Teaching and learning take place via a combination of lectures, student-led seminars, case studies and crisis simulations.

In 2013, this unit will be taught in Semester 2. Further details here.

CISS6004 Disease and Security

This unit assesses the political and security significance of infectious diseases. Whether one contemplates historical experiences with smallpox, plague and cholera, or the contemporary challenges posed by new diseases like HIV/AIDS and SARS, it is clear that pathogenic micro-organisms exercise a powerful influence over civilized humankind. The unit concentrates on areas in which human health and security concerns intersect most closely, including: biological weapons proliferation; responses to fast-moving disease outbreaks of natural origin; safety and security in microbiology laboratories; and the relationships between infectious disease patterns, public health capacity, state functioning and violent conflict. The overall aim of the unit is to provide students with a stronger understanding of the scientific and political nature of these problems, why and how they might threaten security, and the conceptual and empirical connections between them.

In 2013, this unit will be taught in Semester 1. Further details here.

CISS6008 Population and Security

This unit considers the importance of demographic factors in international security. It attempts to provide answers to the complex questions regarding how population changes affect security concerns. In particular it examines how population dynamics and characteristics such as growth rates, fertility, mortality, age and ethnic structure might be linked to national and international security. Among topics covered will be key global population trends, differing world population transitions, the significance of resource scarcity and environmental degradation, the role of natural disasters, and the significance of ethnic and religious divisions. Case studies will be presented with respect to how demographics may contribute to undermining the viability of modern states and the importance of population to security considerations in the Asia-Pacific region.

In 2013, this unit will be taught in Semester 1. Further details here.

CISS6011 Special Topic in International Security (Cyber Security)

What is the cyber realm, and how do governments, militaries and the private sector interact in it? What do we mean by cybersecurity and who is responsible for it? What are the major threats faced in the cyber realm and how to they impact the way we govern, do business and interact with each other? Are we prepared for cyber conflict? CISS6011 will give students a theoretical and practical framework for the study of cybersecurity and discuss the vulnerabilities and capabilities of the Internet and the cyber realm. The first half of the unit focuses on the technical aspects of network and systems security. Students will be expected to understand the different technical tools that attackers use to breach cybersecurity and the context in which they do so. In the second half of the unit, students will discuss the different types of cyber threats, from cybercrime to cyberwar, and will be taught how to formulate and evaluate policy options in relation to different cyber threats.

In 2013, this unit will be taught in Semester 2. Further details here.

CISS6012 Civil-Military Relations

This unit assesses the nature and effectiveness of civil-military cooperation and coordination in preparing for, responding to, and averting the impact of natural disasters (such as the 2004 tsunami) and conflict, particularly in Australia's nearer region. The new realities of intra-state conflict and support to fragile states have seen Australia commit increased resources to enhance prospects for stability and reduce population displacement, while promoting economic development and achievement of the Millennium Development Goals to reduce poverty. Students in this unit will examine the nexus between state-centric and human security, as well as the difficulties for military forces and humanitarian actors in navigating the 'space' in which they are co-located. Policies, principles and practices of the Australian Government, the United Nations, and other key international actors and non-government organisations are considered.

In 2013, this unit will be taught in Semester 2. Further details here.

CISS6013 Middle East Conflict and Security

The Middle East has been plagued for more than a century by a series of national, ethnic and religious conflicts, reflecting shifting regional alliances, the unresolved legacy of the collapse of the Ottoman Empire and the end of colonial rule. This unit examines the causes and manifestation of intra and inter-state state conflict in the region today by starting with a theoretical framework for examining the process of state-formation in the region and the particularities of the Middle East as a region of developing states. The unit will focus first on some of the specific challenges to the state across the region (such as tribalism, political Islam, and the "oil curse") before examining several inter-state conflicts, with a view of considering the probability of the region becoming more peaceful in the foreseeable future.

Further details here.

CISS6015 Alliances and Coalition Warfare

Alliances and coalitions are pivotal features of International Security. This unit interrogates these closely-related phenomena using a combination of conceptual frameworks to analyse them, and empirical case studies to illustrate them. The unit starts with an investigation in the thorny definitional issues that surround the distinctions between 'alliance' and 'coalition', then outlines the major conceptual theoretical works pertinent to examining these phenomena, such as 'balance of power', 'intra-alliance politics', and 'multinational operations'. Equipped with these analytical tools the students will apply these concepts to a series of major cases studies of alliance management and coalition warfare operations. Case studies include World War I and II, The Cold War (NATO/Warsaw Pact), The Gulf War (1991), the Balkan Wars (Bosnia 1992-5, Kosovo 1999) and the current 'global war on terror' (i.e. operations in Iraq and Afghanistan).

In 2013, this unit will be taught in Semester 2. Further details here.

CISS6016 Chinese Foreign and Security Policy

China's rise to regional and global prominence has attracted growing attention in recent years. Scholars as well as policymakers debate and assess the implications of rising Chinese power for regional security and the international system. This seminar introduces students to Chinese foreign and security policy, including its handling of major-power relations, its active pursuit of multilateral diplomacy in regional organizations and participation in international peacekeeping operations, and its changing perspectives on arms control, disarmament, and non-proliferation. It begins with a brief history of phases in Chinese foreign and security policy and then gives an overview of major theoretical approaches to the subject.

In 2013, this unit will be taught in Semester 1. Further details here.

Table B Electives

CISS6009 Research Essay 1

This unit consists of a 6000 word research essay under the guidance of a supervisor from CISS. Normally it involves deeper study of a subject which the student has already covered in her/his degree. Entry into this unit is by permission only, and depends upon the availability of a CISS supervisor for the proposed topic and student's existing knowledge in the area.

MCom, MBus, and MIntSec students can take this unit as a stand-alone elective unit. MIntSec students may also take this unit in conjunction with CISS6010 Research Essay 2, writing a supervised dissertation of 10000 - 12000 words.

In 2013, this unit will be taught in Semesters 1 and 2. Further details here.

CISS6010 Research Essay 2

This unit is the second of a two-part, supervised dissertation of 10000 -12000 words to be taken in conjunction with CISS6009 Research Essay 1. Entry into this unit is by permission only and requires the completion of a minimum of 4 units with an average of 75%, and upon the availability of a CISS supervisor for the proposed topic.

In 2013, this unit will be taught in Semesters 1 and 2. Further details here.