Projects

Similarity detection software

During Semester 2 of 2012, members of the School of Social and Political Sciences and the School of Economics participated in a pilot documenting the strategies around the use of Turnitin - a text similarity detection software. The relative success of the pilot, and the School of Language and Media’s smaller pilot during 2013, has resulted in a large uptake in the integration of Turnitin into the Faculty’s blended learning practices.

Since the pilot, Arts eLearning has created a series of how-to guides for tutors and markers; conducted a series of workshops specifically for tutors. Special in-lab training is conducted for the tutors of the Faculty’s very large units. It is expected that more Coordinators will incorporate Turnitin into their marking in 2014: the School of Economics is considering running a pilot on using the software for online marking only and the Department of Classics and Ancient History is trialing its use in their dully online assessments trial.

For more information, please contact

Faculty Online Presence Project

The project aims to develop a flexible, blended learning presence for five new postgraduate coursework degree programs in the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences - Art Curating, Economic Analysis, English Studies, and Museum and Heritage Studies-to ensure that there is adequate support in place in order for the sites to function effectively, beginning with the 2014 academic year. Arts eLearning, in concert with the degree directors, is designing and constructing Blackboard Learn sites for the corresponding Units of Study to deliver a blended learning experience for enrolled students.

By-products of this project include the creation and maintenance of a series of Quicktips (short guides to remind instructors on processes and procedures), and short FASS-specific instructional videos as well as two Faculty templates for use in the construction of future blended learning sites.

For more information, please contact

Voice Tools

Charles has been working closely with a number of academics to implement the use of Voice Tools (mostly Voice Boards and Voice Authoring) in various stages of learning activities and assessment tasks.

SLC coordinators and tutors are using audio, and in particular Voice Tools, within Blackboard for a variety of purposes such as:

Using voice to supplement text in online teaching and learning adds a different dimension and makes the interaction warmer, more human. This can be especially beneficial for the First Year Experience.
Encouraging students to go beyond text in their online learning environment and to communicate orally makes it easier to address some issues of academic and professional communication. This oral communication taking place with the help of Blackboard Voice Tools also gives opportunities for language students to practice in a safe place before being asked to interact in a foreign language during the face-to-face tutorials.

  • Teachers giving oral feedback
  • Teachers introducing and clarifying assignments
  • Teachers or other instructors giving a prompt in an assignment
  • Students responding to teachers or to other students

Using voice to supplement text in online teaching and learning adds a different dimension and makes the interaction warmer, more human. This can be especially beneficial for the First Year Experience.

Encouraging students to go beyond text in their online learning environment and to communicate orally makes it easier to address some issues of academic and professional communication. This oral communication taking place with the help of Blackboard Voice Tools also gives opportunities for language students to practice in a safe place before being asked to interact in a foreign language during the face-to-face tutorials.

For more information, please contact

Fully online assessments trial

Dept. of Classics & Ancient History -

In Semester 2, 2013, CAH undertook to have all assessments submitted online. Students and staff have given feedback about how it was to use, both in terms of submitting, marking, accessing feedback and assignment pick up rates. Results are currently being collated. One interesting statistic from one of the first year classes polled, was that while more students preferred to submit assignments online, a clear majority of students preferred to receive their feedback on paper. This suggests further probing into the reasons behind this preference and whether it is more about habit, the technology currently used, or other factors.

For more information, please contact

eLearning Resources

Sam is assisting in the creation of quick-tips, how-tos, and instructional videos on Blackboard tools and features.

For more information, please contact