Events

  • Date
    Time
    Event
  • 12th March, 2013
    11.45 - 1.30 pm
  • 1st April, 2014
    11.45 - 1.30 PM

    Lunchtime Research Seminar Series

    After decades of research, we still lack a measure of democratic consolidation capturing the self-enforcing nature of democracies.  Using data from the Electoral Integrity Project for 64 democratic and non-democratic countries in 2012 and 2013, we create an indicator based on how parties or candidates react once votes are cast and one of them is declared the winner.

  • 8th April, 2014
    11.45 - 1.30PM

    Lunch Time Research Seminar Series

    Synopsis:Why do elections fail or succeed? Building upon accounts seeking to explain broader processes of democratization, the key factors can be divided into three categories emphasizing, respectively, the roles of fixed structural conditions, domestic institutions, and international determinants.

  • 15th April, 2014
    11.45 - 1.30 pm

    Lunch time Research Seminar Series

    Synopsis: Political parties commonly set up criteria in their party regulations to define the pool of  eligibles. This paper analyzes the potential consequences of these eligibility criteria on therepresentation of men and women.

  • 29th April, 2014
    11.45 - 1.30 PM

    Lunch time Research Seminar Series

    Synopsis:A global comparison of the laws governing political parties reveals a significant degree of diversity – in the sources from which these laws derive, the specific functions they target, and the extent to which they regulate parties as political organizations and electoral actors.

  • 6th May, 2014
    11.45 - 1.30 PM

    Lunch time Research Seminar Series

    Lunchtime Research Seminar series hosted by Department of Government and International Relations - School of Social and Political Sciences

     

  • 20th May, 2014
    11.45am - 1.30pm
  • 12th August, 2014
    11.45 - 1.30PM
  • 26th August, 2014
    11.45 AM - 1.30 PM

    Lunch time Research Seminar Series

    This paper examines the conditions under which electoral integrity allows non-democratic societies to avoid violent conflict, and the conditions under which it might contribute to such conflict. While freer and fairer elections can pose a threat to those holding power in such regimes, elections with low integrity can lead to violence by a frustrated opposition.

  • 14th October, 2014
    11.45 AM - 1.30 PM

    Lunch time Research Seminar Series

    Secrecy of the vote is enshrined in supranational legal frameworks to free and fair elections. Democratic innovation focusing on higher rates of participation and efficiency to enhance legitimacy can have consequences for electoral integrity and the secrecy of the vote. Postal voting and internet voting face similar problems regarding the secrecy of the vote. Both are open to coercion and voter interference.