Associate Professor Charlotte Epstein

MA - La Sorbonne; Mphil., PhD - Cantab.

H04 - Merewether Building
The University of Sydney

Telephone +61 2 9351 2082

Website Contact Details

Biographical details

My interests are in the areas of International Relations theory, particularly in post-structuralist approaches and discourse theory, critical security studies and global environmental politics. In my book, The Power of Words in International Relations: Birth of An Anti-Whaling Discourse, I approach the topic of whaling both as an object of analysis in its own right and as a lens for examining the role of discursive power in international relations.

Before joining the department, I was a Georges Lurcy Visiting Scholar at the UC Berkeley Political Science Department. I hold two undergraduate degrees in Humanities (in Philosophy and Literature) and a Masters in Philosophy from L'Université de Paris-Sorbonne, an MPhil and a PhD in International Relations from the University of Cambridge. I also taught at both Cambridge University and UC Berkeley before coming to Sydney. At the University of Sydney I teach courses on IR theory, political theory, and global environment politics.

Research interests

  • international relations/political theory
  • continental thought
  • postcolonial thought
  • sovereignty and statehood
  • surveillance
  • food security

Teaching and supervision

Current Courses
  • GOVT6147 - Foundations of International Relations
  • GOVT2616 - Key Concepts in Political Thought
  • Power and Identity in International Relations (honours research seminar)

Current projects

I am currently working on a book that explores the theoretical foundations underpinning the concepts of agency, subjectivity and discourse in international relations.

Associations

Charlotte is affiliated as a chercheur associé with the Centre d'Etudes et de Recherches Internationales (CERI/Science-Po Paris), as well as the l'Institut Français des Relations Internationales (IFRI) (Paris), and, at Sydney, she is an Associate of the Centre for International Law and the Centre for International Security Studies.

Editorial Board Memberships

Charlotte currently serves on the editorial boards of International Studies Quarterly, International Political Sociology, Global Environmental Politics, Security Dialogue, International Studies Review, International Studies Perspective, and the Australian Journal of Political Science.

Awards and honours

Some Publication Highlights

Epstein, C. (2014). The postcolonial perspective: an introduction. International Theory, 6(2), 294-311. Available here.

Epstein, C. (2013). Theorizing Agency in Hobbes's Wake: The Rational Actor, the Self or the Speaking Subject? International Organization, 67(2), 287-361.

Epstein, C. (2013). Constructivism Or the Eternal Return of Universals in International Relations. Why Returning to Language is Vital For Prolonging The Owl's Flight. European Journal of International Relations, 19(3), 499-519. Special issue on: The End of Theory?

Epstein, C. (2012). Symposium: Interrogating the Use of Norms in International Relations: An Introduction. International Studies Perspectives, 13(2), 121-122.

Epstein, C. (2007). Guilty Bodies, Productive Bodies, Destructive Bodies: Crossing the Biometric Borders. International Political Sociology, 1(2), 149-164.

Some Guest Speaker Presentations

2013: Whale Wars: Blood and Water – Digital Documentary on the Discovery Channel: [weblink]

2013: Université de Montréal's 'Cours de Maître' (master class) speaker series: [more information]

2011: Opening keynote address for the Surveillance and Everyday Life Conference, University of Sydney, July 2011, 'The Big Other is Watching You: Surveillance, Sovereignty, Subjectivity': [video]

2010: Invited lecture at the Humanities and Arts Research Centre and the New Political Communication Unit, Royal Holloway, the University of London: [podcast]

Selected publications

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Books

  • Epstein, C. (2008). The Power of Words in International Relations: Birth of an Anti-Whaling Discourse. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

Book Chapters

  • Epstein, C. (2010). Moby Dick or Moby Doll? Discourse, or How to Study the "Social Construction of" All The Way Down. In Abdelal, R, Blyth M. and Parsons C (Eds.), Constructing the International Economy, (pp. 175-193). Ithaca: Cornell University Press.
  • Epstein, C. (2008). Embodying Risk: Using biometrics to protect the borders. In Louise Amoore and Marieke de Goede (Eds.), Risk and the War on Terror, (pp. 178-193). Abingdon, New York: Routledge imprint of Taylor & Francis.

Journals

  • Epstein, C. (2014). The postcolonial perspective: an introduction. International Theory, 6(2), 294-311. [More Information]
  • Epstein, C. (2013). Constructivism or the eternal return of universals in International Relations. Why returning to language is vital for prolonging the owl's flight. European Journal of International Relations, 19(3), 499-519. [More Information]
  • Barclay, K., Epstein, C. (2013). Securing Fish for the Nation: Food Security and Governmentality in Japan. Asian Studies Review, 37(2), 215-233. [More Information]
  • Epstein, C., Barclay, K. (2013). Shaming to 'green': Australia-Japan relations and whales and tuna compared. International Relations of the Asia-Pacific, 13(1), 95-123. [More Information]
  • Epstein, C. (2013). Theorizing Agency in Hobbes's Wake: The Rational Actor, the Self, or the Speaking Subject? International Organization, 67(2), 287-316. [More Information]
  • Epstein, C. (2012). Stop Telling Us How to Behave: Socialization or Infantilization? International Studies Perspectives, 13(2), 135-145. [More Information]
  • Epstein, C. (2012). Symposium: Interrogating the Use of Norms in International Relations: An Introduction. International Studies Perspectives, 13(2), 121-122. [More Information]
  • Epstein, C. (2011). Who Speaks? Discourse, the subject and the study of identity in international politics. European Journal of International Relations, 17(2), 327-350. [More Information]
  • Epstein, C. (2009). The Oceans around Us: Borders and Sustenance. Academy of the Social Sciences in Australia. Dialogue, 28(1), 5-13.
  • Epstein, C. (2007). Guilty Bodies, Productive Bodies, Destructive Bodies: Crossing the Biometric Borders. International Political Sociology, 1(2), 149-164.
  • Epstein, C. (2006). The Making of Environmental Norms: Endangered Species Protection. Global Environmental Politics, 6(2), 32-54.
  • Epstein, C. (2005). Knowledge and Power in Global Environmental Activism. International Journal of Peace Studies, 10(1), 47-67.
  • Epstein, C. (2003). WorldWideWhale.Globalisation/Dialogue of Cultures? Cambridge Review of International Affairs, 16(2), 309-322.

Reference Works

  • Epstein, C. (2015). Shaming. In Jean-Frédéric Morin and Amandine Orsini (Eds.), Essential Concepts of Global Environmental Governance. (pp. 193-195). London & New York: Routledge.
  • Epstein, C. (2007). Common But Differentiated Responsibility. Encyclopaedia of Governance volume 1. (Vol. 1, pp. 115-116). USA: Sage Publications.
  • Epstein, C. (2007). Endangered Species Protection. In Mark Bevir (Eds.), Encyclopaedia of Governance volume 1. (Vol. 1, pp. 272-273). USA: Sage Publications.
  • Epstein, C. (2007). Natural Resource Management. (Vol. 2, pp. 590-593).
  • Epstein, C. (2007). The Ecosystemic Approach. In Mark Bevir (Eds.), Encyclopaedia of Governance volume 1. (Vol. 1, pp. 255-255). USA: Sage Publications.
  • Epstein, C. (2007). The Precautionary Principle. In Mark Bevir (Eds.), Encyclopaedia of Gevernance Volume 2. (Vol. 2, pp. 744-745). USA: Sage Publications.

2015

  • Epstein, C. (2015). Shaming. In Jean-Frédéric Morin and Amandine Orsini (Eds.), Essential Concepts of Global Environmental Governance. (pp. 193-195). London & New York: Routledge.

2014

  • Epstein, C. (2014). The postcolonial perspective: an introduction. International Theory, 6(2), 294-311. [More Information]

2013

  • Epstein, C. (2013). Constructivism or the eternal return of universals in International Relations. Why returning to language is vital for prolonging the owl's flight. European Journal of International Relations, 19(3), 499-519. [More Information]
  • Barclay, K., Epstein, C. (2013). Securing Fish for the Nation: Food Security and Governmentality in Japan. Asian Studies Review, 37(2), 215-233. [More Information]
  • Epstein, C., Barclay, K. (2013). Shaming to 'green': Australia-Japan relations and whales and tuna compared. International Relations of the Asia-Pacific, 13(1), 95-123. [More Information]
  • Epstein, C. (2013). Theorizing Agency in Hobbes's Wake: The Rational Actor, the Self, or the Speaking Subject? International Organization, 67(2), 287-316. [More Information]

2012

  • Epstein, C. (2012). Stop Telling Us How to Behave: Socialization or Infantilization? International Studies Perspectives, 13(2), 135-145. [More Information]
  • Epstein, C. (2012). Symposium: Interrogating the Use of Norms in International Relations: An Introduction. International Studies Perspectives, 13(2), 121-122. [More Information]

2011

  • Epstein, C. (2011). Who Speaks? Discourse, the subject and the study of identity in international politics. European Journal of International Relations, 17(2), 327-350. [More Information]

2010

  • Epstein, C. (2010). Moby Dick or Moby Doll? Discourse, or How to Study the "Social Construction of" All The Way Down. In Abdelal, R, Blyth M. and Parsons C (Eds.), Constructing the International Economy, (pp. 175-193). Ithaca: Cornell University Press.

2009

  • Epstein, C. (2009). The Oceans around Us: Borders and Sustenance. Academy of the Social Sciences in Australia. Dialogue, 28(1), 5-13.

2008

  • Epstein, C. (2008). Embodying Risk: Using biometrics to protect the borders. In Louise Amoore and Marieke de Goede (Eds.), Risk and the War on Terror, (pp. 178-193). Abingdon, New York: Routledge imprint of Taylor & Francis.
  • Epstein, C. (2008). The Power of Words in International Relations: Birth of an Anti-Whaling Discourse. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

2007

  • Epstein, C. (2007). Common But Differentiated Responsibility. Encyclopaedia of Governance volume 1. (Vol. 1, pp. 115-116). USA: Sage Publications.
  • Epstein, C. (2007). Endangered Species Protection. In Mark Bevir (Eds.), Encyclopaedia of Governance volume 1. (Vol. 1, pp. 272-273). USA: Sage Publications.
  • Epstein, C. (2007). Guilty Bodies, Productive Bodies, Destructive Bodies: Crossing the Biometric Borders. International Political Sociology, 1(2), 149-164.
  • Epstein, C. (2007). Natural Resource Management. (Vol. 2, pp. 590-593).
  • Epstein, C. (2007). The Ecosystemic Approach. In Mark Bevir (Eds.), Encyclopaedia of Governance volume 1. (Vol. 1, pp. 255-255). USA: Sage Publications.
  • Epstein, C. (2007). The Precautionary Principle. In Mark Bevir (Eds.), Encyclopaedia of Gevernance Volume 2. (Vol. 2, pp. 744-745). USA: Sage Publications.

2006

  • Epstein, C. (2006). The Making of Environmental Norms: Endangered Species Protection. Global Environmental Politics, 6(2), 32-54.

2005

  • Epstein, C. (2005). Knowledge and Power in Global Environmental Activism. International Journal of Peace Studies, 10(1), 47-67.

2003

  • Epstein, C. (2003). WorldWideWhale.Globalisation/Dialogue of Cultures? Cambridge Review of International Affairs, 16(2), 309-322.

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