Achievements

Awards and Achievements

ARC

Robert Aldrich, Sheila Fitzpatrick, Judith Keene and Peter Read, Michael McDonnell and Shane White have been awarded Australian Research Council Grants to commence in 2013, for the following projects:

  • Robert Aldrich, Banishing potentates: European colonialists and indigenous rulers in the British and French overseas empires (2013-2015)
  • Sheila Fitzpatrick (with Mark Edele), War and displacement: from the Soviet Union to Australia in the wake of the Second World War (2013-2015)
  • Judith Keene and Peter Read (with Elizabeth Rechniewski, Marivic Wyndham and Adrian Vickers), Judging the past in a post-Cold War world (2013-2015)
  • Michael McDonnell (with Clare Corbould and Fitz Brundage), The revolution in Black American life: memory and history in the making of African America (2013-2015)
  • Shane White, The Prince of Darkness: Wall Street's first black millionaire (2013-2015)
AHA

Frances Clarke and Emma Christopher won book awards at the recent Australian Historical Association Conference.

Frances Clarke was joint winner of the W. K. Hancock Prize for a first book in any field of history for War Stories: Suffering and Sacrifice in the Civil War North (University of Chicago Press)

Emma Christopher won the Kay Daniels Award in Early Colonial History for A Merciless Place: The Lost Story of Britain’s Convict Disaster in Africa and How it Led to the Settlement of Australia (Allen & Unwin)

PMLA

Mark McKenna won the 2012 Prime Minister's Literary Award Non-fiction for his An Eye for Eternity: The Life of Manning Clark. Each of the winners receives $80,000 tax free.

The Judges Comments: "This is a masterful biography, a deeply compassionate portrait of a complex and flawed man. With a biographer’s literary skill and an historian’s diligence, Mark McKenna offers a rounded, humane treatment of Australia’s best-known historian, encompassing both Manning Clark’s life and work. This wise, clear-eyed portrait of perhaps our most influential historian is essential reading for all Australians seeking to understand the transformation of Australian cultural nationalism in the second half of the twentieth century."

ARC

In the latest round of Australian Research Council Grants, Mark McKenna has been awarded a Future Fellowship and Blanca Tovias de Plaisted a Discovery Early Career Researcher Award:

  • Mark McKenna, Australia: the search for a foundational history (Future Fellowship, 2011-2015)
  • Blanca Tovias de Plaisted, Entangled colonialisms: First Nations women of the American-Canadian Borderlands, 1880-1940 (Discovery Early Career Researcher Award, 2012-2014)
ARC

Warwick Anderson and Penny Russell have been awarded Australian Research Council Grants to commence in 2012, for the following projects:

  • Warwick Anderson (with Ian Mackay), Disease and the modern self: becoming autoimmune (Discovery Project, 2012-2014)
  • Penny Russell (with Nigel Worden, University of Capetown), Empires of honour: violence and virtue in colonial societies, 1750-1850 (Discovery Project, 2012-2014)
NSW Premier

Two books by members of the History Department won 2011 NSW Premier's History Awards:


Arts NSW

Matthew Allen, a postgraduate student in the department, won the 2011 NSW Archival Research Fellowship. The $15,000 fellowship is to assist the winner to complete an innovative and quality research project that makes substantial use of the records collection of the State Records Authority of NSW. Matt's project is to investigate the use of summary jurisdiction by the NSW magistracy in the first half of the 19th century.

Mark McKenna won the Non-Fiction Book Award in both the 2011 Queensland Premier's Literary Awards and the 2011 Victorian Premier's Literary Award for his An Eye for Eternity: The life of Manning Clark

ARC

Warwick Anderson was awarded an Australian Laureate Fellowship, commencing in 2011. This five year grant is the most prestigious of the Australian Research Council's schemes. Only seventeen were awarded in 2011, with Warwick the only recipient from the humanities. His project "aims to reveal intense scientific debate about what it meant to be human in the southern hemisphere during the twentieth century, placing Australian racial thought in a new context. Through comparative study, it shows the distinctive character and scope of racial ideas in southern settler societies, and assesses their global impact."

ARC

Iain McCalman has been awarded an Australian Research Council Linkage Grant commencing in July 2011. The project, "Cultures of Coast and Sea: maritime environmental, cultural and ethnographic histories of north-east Australia, 1770-2010," "will study the impact of maritime and marine environmental and cultural change on the peoples and habitats of the Great Barrier Reef and the Torres Strait from the eighteenth century to the present." The partner organizations are the Australian National Maritime Museum, the Queensland Museum, and the Silentworld Foundation, and the grant includes a postdoctoral fellow, Dr Michael Davis.

RUSA

Stephen Robertson, Shane White, Stephen Garton, & Graham White were awarded the American Library Association's ABC-CLIO Online History Award for 2010, for Digital Harlem, their site on everyday life in the neighborhood in the 1920s. This is the second major American award won by the site.

ARC

Alison Bashford has been awarded a Future Fellowship by the Australian Research Council, to start in 2011, examining "Climate change and the history of environmental determinism". The project description reads, "In previous centuries, most scientists presumed that environment and climate determined human health, capacities and difference. By tracing this longstanding idea through the twentieth century, this project will identify implications for current climate science."

Amanda Kaladelfos, a recent PhD graduate of the department was awarded the 2010 NSW Archival Research Fellowship]. The $15,000 fellowship is to assist the winner to complete an innovative and quality research project that makes substantial use of the records collection of the State Records Authority of NSW. Amanda's project is a history of capital punishment in NSW from 1855 to 1939, when the last person was hanged. The fellowship was presented as part of the NSW Premier's History Awards.

Amanda Kaladelfos also received the 2010 David Scott Mitchell Memorial Fellowship from the State Library of New South Wales to pursue another part of her project on capital punishment. The fellowship is to encourage and support the use of the Mitchell Library's collections for the study and research of Australian history in writing and publication amongst scholars, researches and the wider community, including internationally. Amanda's project, Citizens of Mercy: Bushrangers, Punishment and Public Opinion in colonial NSW, will look at the way ordinary citizens conceived of justice and law, by examining the vigorous protests and organized opposition to the sentence of capital punishment – particularly as applied to bushrangers.

Toby Martin, a postgraduate student in the department, won the 2010 John Ferry Award from the History Council of New South Wales for his essay 'Country Music Capital: Heritage in Tamworth'. The John Ferry Award is awarded annually to recognise outstanding local and community histories within New South Wales. Toby's essay explores the evolution of Tamworth as a 'country music town' from the 1960s onwards as an example of 'invented tradition'.

Agnieszka Sobocinska, a postgraduate student in the department, has won the 2010 Max Kelly Medal awarded by the History Council of New South Wales. The medal is awarded annually to a ‘beginning’ historian for a work of excellence in any aspect of Australian history. Agnieszka's winning essay was titled, 'The Language of Scars': POWs' Bodies and the Overturning of the Colonial Order'.

ARC logo

Iain McCalman, Kirsten McKenzie, Cassandra Pybus & Kit Candlin, and Shane White, Stephen Robertson & Stephen Garton, have been awarded Australian Research Council Grants to commence in 2011, for the following projects:

WA Premier

Iain McCalman won the 2009 Western Australian Premier's Book Prize for Non-Fiction for his Darwin’s Armada: How four voyagers to Australasia won the battle for evolution and changed the world.


Warwick Anderson won a third major prize for his The Collectors of Lost Souls: Turning Kuru Scientists into Whitemen (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2008): the 2010 Ludwik Fleck Prize at the annual meeting of the Society for Social Studies of Science (4S) in Tokyo. Named for a pioneering philosopher of medicine and science (and immunologist), the Fleck Prize is awarded annually for the best book in the area of science and technology studies (STS).

Mark McKenna was appointed to the Keith Cameron Chair of Australian Studies at University College, Dublin, in 2011

Warwick Anderson was awarded the 2010 William H. Welch Medal of the American Association for the History of Medicine (AAHM) for his The Collectors of Lost Souls: Turning Kuru Scientists into Whitemen (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2008). The Medal is awarded to a book of outstanding scholarly merit in the field of medical history published during the five calendar years preceding the award

Stephen Robertson, Shane White, Stephen Garton, & Graham White were awarded the American Historical Association's inaugural Roy Rosenzweig Prize for Innovation in Digital History, for Digital Harlem, their site on everyday life in the neighborhood in the 1920s.

Shane White, Stephen Garton, & Stephen Robertson were awarded a 2010 University of Sydney Bridging Support Grant for their project Year of the Riot: Harlem, 1935.

Publications

Cover of English Chris Hilliard, English as a Vocation: The ‘Scrutiny’ Movement (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012).
Cover of War Stories Frances Clarke, War Stories: Suffering and Sacrifice in the Civil War North (University of Chicago Press, 2011)

Cover of Curtin's Empire James Curran, Curtin's Empire (Cambridge University Press, 2011)

Cover of An eye for eternity Mark McKenna, An Eye for Eternity: The Life of Manning Clark (Miegunyah Press, 2011)

Cover of Savage or Civilised Penny Russell, Savage or Civilised?: Manners in Colonial Australia (UNSW Press, 2010)

Cover of A Mercliess Place Emma Christopher, A Merciless Place: The Lost History of the Convicts sent to West Africa and the Settlement of Australia (Allen & Unwin, 2010)

 Cover of The Unknown Nation James Curran and Stuart Ward, The Unknown Nation: Australia After Empire (Melbourne University Press, 2010)

Cover of Playing the Numbers Shane White, Stephen Garton, Stephen Robertson and Graham White, Playing the Numbers: Gambling in Harlem Between the Wars (Harvard University Press, 2010)


Journals

History australia

In 2008 Penny Russell and Richard White assumed the editorship of History Australia, the official journal of the Australian Historical Association. The journal aims to reflect the concerns, publish the research and increase the professional self-awareness of historians making, teaching and applying history, particularly in Australia and New Zealand. It publishes refereed articles that draw on new historical research or address ways of teaching, exhibiting or applying historical knowledge. Contributions are invited on all geographical regions, not just Australasian; local, national, international, imperial and colonial histories; and research using textual, oral and visual sources.

History Australia is published by Monash University ePress, in both print and digital versions. Both versions include a generous number of illustrations, appearing in colour online. The digital version can also carry sound bites and video clips and we encourage contributors to bear these capabilities in mind. Where materials cited in History Australia such as journal articles are already available online, the full text may be accessible directly from the citation in History Australia; articles published in History Australia will be similarly available from the text of other online journals.