History on a Monday

Seminar Series for Postgraduates and Faculty

Held at 12.10-1.30
in Woolley Common Room, Woolley Building A22
(Enter Woolley through the entrance on Science Road and climb the stairs in front of you. Turn left down the corridor, and the WCR is the door at the end of the hall)
Click here for map

2014 Coordinators:
Miranda Johnson and Peter Hobbins
Click here to email

The semester at a glance

Semester 1

Date Speaker Title
10 March Jacqui Newling Colonial cooking: scurvy, starvation and scones
17 March Chin Jou Urban Riots of the 1960s and Federal Sponsorship of Fast Food Franchises in America’s Inner Cities.
24 March Julia Horne, Richard Lehane, Elizabeth Miller Panel: Digital archives and scholarship
31 March Frances Clarke Child soldiers: militarism and youth in the American Civil War
7 April Peter Hobbins, Annie Clarke,
Peta Longhurst
Spotlight: The Quarantine Project
14 April Chris Parker We've seen this Before - Reactionary Conservatism before the Tea Party.
21 April EASTER MONDAY  
28 April Richard Rabinowitz, Anna Clark, Hannah Forsyth Panel: Public history and advocacy
5 May Micol Siegel Violence Workers in the Security World:  the View from Alaska
12 May Sarah Kovner
Allied captivity and Swiss neutrality in the Pacific, 1941-45
19 May Alan Atkinson Moral Intuition and the Origins of Sydney University
26 May Mark Ledbury, Alison Betts,
Lynne Swarts
Panel: Visual media as historical evidence
2 June Emma Christopher Documentary film screening: They Are We

Semester 2

Date Speaker Title
4 August Sam Moyn & Marco Duranti New perspectives on the history of human rights
11 August Honni van Rijswijk, Denise Donlon, Sarah Crawford Panel: Histories of violence
18 August Robert Aldrich, Felicity Berry,
Sarah Dunstan
Panel: How do individuals construct belonging and a sense of self in the context of Empires?
25 August Helen Dunstan Of corpsely chaos and necropolitical order, or who really ruled the roost in 1730s China
1 September Nick Eckstein Poisonous neighbours: tracking plague through the streets of Florence
8 September Mike McDonnell An American tragedy: rethinking the American Revolution
15 September Warwick Anderson, Sarah Walsh, Sebastian Gil Riano Spotlight: Race and Ethnicity in the Global South
22 September Stefan Collini & Chris Hilliard Conversation (tbc)
29 September COMMON WEEK  
6 October LABOUR DAY  
13 October Lisa Ford, Kirsten McKenzie,
Tiarne Barratt
Panel: On the Case in Historical Writing
20 October Ivan Crozier Histories of transcultural psychiatry
27 October Daniel Spence & Harry Sargent 'Seafaring race' theory: colonial naval identity and British imperial power
Titles & Abstracts


First fleet foodscapes: a re-evaluation of the 'hungry years' 1788–1795
Jacqui Newling

Food was instrumental in the colonization of New South Wales, however it is rarely examined as the central focus of research. Traditionally, historians have limited the subject of food in early settlement of NSW to inadequacy of rations, poor farming efforts and failure to embrace native resources resulting in hunger rather than use it as a lens into a broader social history context. While these issues may have been factors in the early development of the colony they provide a narrow view of early settler foodways. Gastronomic analysis of primary material reveals richer more nuanced foodscapes and helps us better understand habitus across the social tiers in the earliest settlement years.



Urban Riots of the 1960s and Federal Sponsorship of Fast Food Franchises in America’s Inner Cities.
Dr. Chin Jou (Harvard University)

This paper links the arrival of fast food chain restaurants in America’s inner cities to urban riots of the mid-to-late 1960s. In the aftermath of the riots, U.S. federal policy makers devised ways to promote economic development and forestall future unrest. Fast food franchises were seen as part of urban revitalization efforts, and touted as vehicles for job growth and minority entrepreneurship. Federal support of the fast food industry ultimately took the form of loan guarantees, tax incentives, and minority entrepreneurship training programs – forms of government largesse fast food companies welcomed with alacrity. Although not the only reason behind the proliferation of urban fast food outlets, a consideration of the 1960s riots helps to illuminate how inner-city, minority communities became key constituencies of the “fast food nation.”



Panel: Digital archives and scholarship
Richard Lehane, Archivist, State Records NSW
This presentation will comprise an overview of online access to archives at the State Records Authority of NSW. Initiatives discussed will feature crowdsourcing, outsourcing, catalogues, digitisation and digital archives, including the Open Data project, and a new search engine, "Search".

Associate Professor Julia Horne, Department of History, University of Sydney
Digital humanities is the way of the future, but how to approach what to many historians is an alien concept? How should historians think digitally in disseminating their research? And why? Drawing on her sometimes fraught experience with online history Julia Horne will discuss the challenges for historians becoming digitally literate.

Elizabeth Miller, PhD candidate, Department of History, University of Sydney
Religious participation is increasingly digital. Not only are church publications often found solely online; there are groups of people who only attend church online. How can historians organise and use these sources? How can they meaningfully be compared to other archives? Elizabeth will explore the opportunities and challenges of digital archives for historians.



Child Soldiers: Militarism and Youth in the American Civil War
Dr. Frances Clarke

The ideal of childhood innocence was firmly in place by the time the American Civil War broke out in 1861. But this did not stop hundreds of thousands of boys and young men, aged between 7 and 17, from enlisting in the Union military. Unlike other child laborers, these youths were not understood by middle-class spokespeople as non-children; instead, than were held up as inspirational figures. Analyzing the cultural work performed by depictions of child soldiers and musicians, my paper suggests that these depictions helped to mediate concerns over the many threats that the war posed to the inviolability of the republic and the blamelessness of its white citizens.



Spotlight: the Quarantine Project
‘Spotlight’ is intended to showcase the collaborative projects occurring within and beyond the Department of History. Rather than presenting outcomes, the focus is on research methods and questions driving work in progress.

Dr Peter Hobbins – Research Associate, Department of History
Quarantine is often portrayed as a practice of incarceration, debasement and suffering, but is this narrative borne out by the material and archival remnants of those who passed through Sydney’s North Head Quarantine Station? As home to over 1000 messages carved into its sandstone or scrawled on its walls, do these traces represent voyages, maladies, confinements, or assertions of identity? As a collaborative history-archaeology initiative, the Quarantine Project investigates these perspectives through multiple approaches to interpreting the site and its histories.

Ms Peta Longhurst – PhD candidate, Department of Archaeology
Through its concern with public health and disease transmission, quarantine is an inherently spatial and material act. My research is concerned with the ways in which disease and contagion are materially encoded at quarantine sites. This talk will briefly outline my research project, and in doing so consider what constitutes an archaeology of quarantine.

Dr Annie Clarke – Chief Investigator, Department of Archaeology
Quarantine stations were initially built as specialist institutions, but as the need for mass quarantine declined, the facilities at North Head were used for other forms of social regulation and welfare. These included a detention centre for illegal immigrants, an evacuation centre after Cyclone Tracy and as a nursery for ‘Operation Babylift’ during the Vietnam War. This presentation compares two distinct assemblages of marks – those carved into public spaces and others pencilled into enclosures – as a prompt to think about materiality, affect and memory.



We've seen this Before - Reactionary Conservatism before the Tea Party.
Professor Christopher Parker

Chris Parker (PhD, University of Chicago, 2001) is an associate professor in the Department of Political Science at the University of Washington. The bulk of his research takes a behavioural approhttp://cms.ucc.usyd.edu.au/iw-cc/datacapture/images/btn_repliadd.gifach to historical events. More specifically, he brings survey data to bear on questions of historical import.

His first book, Fighting for Democracy: Black Veterans and the Struggle Against White Supremacy in the Postwar South (Princeton University Press, 2009), takes a fresh approach to the civil rights movement by gauging the extent to which black veterans contributed to social change. A second book, now underway and using data collected in 1968, examines the ideological and sociological origins of what has come to be known as the urban crisis of the 1960s. In short, it examines the micro-foundations of the disturbances that swept America in the late 1960s.

A Robert Wood Johnson Scholar (2005-07), Parker has published in the Journal of Politics, International Security, Political Research Quarterly, and the Du Bois Review.

In conjunction with the US Studies Centre. The session will be followed by a light lunch at 1.30pm, provided by the USSC.



Violence Workers in the Security World: the View from Alaska
Micol Siegel
Associate Professor of American Studies and History at Indiana University, Bloomington

The behemoth system of public-private security that emerged to police the TransAlaska Pipeline System in the mid-1970s reveals several critical facets of the history of U.S. policing and empire. This talk follows police and security officers through multiple pieces of greater Alaska’s public and private security systems in the course of variegated careers. Crossing over repeatedly from public to private and federal to state bodies, the police working on the pipeline helped to birth a critical complex of twenty-first century U.S. power. Perhaps even more important than any direct contribution to U.S. imperial expansion via oil was the indirect support for the framework of the security state. The hype around security for the pipeline made Alaska a perfect site for the development of the concrete and ideological buttresses of an emergent public-private hybrid “security world.”



Allied captivity and Swiss neutrality in the Pacific, 1941-45
Associate Professor Sarah Kovner
University of Florida
This paper explores the work of Swiss diplomats and Red Cross delegates to explain the experience of Allied POWs and civilian internees in the Pacific War. As the only foreigners allowed into both POW and internee camps, and the only ones to work in Japan as well as Allied countries, they were uniquely positioned to record the flow of information between the two sides, the attempts to deliver material and financial aid, and the intensifying exchange of recrimination and threats. Washington and Tokyo made claims and counter-claims about the observance or non-observance of the Geneva Conventions. Both sides threatened and carried out reprisals and made their observance of international law conditional on the conduct of the enemy. While life was far worse for Allied captives than for their Japanese counterparts, it was not because of a deliberate policy of cruelty. Instead, senior Japanese officials never developed clear policy guidance for POWs and failed to provide adequate logistical and administrative support. The few Japanese officials who oversaw the camp system lacked any authority over individual commanders. Even so, by working as intermediaries between the two sides of the Pacific War, the Swiss may well have helped prevent a bad situation from becoming even worse.



Moral Intuition and the Origins of Sydney University
Alan Atkinson
Historians tend to think of ethical motivation as fairly unproblematic. Sometimes it is simply a question as to how much cynicism a scholar wants to inject into his or her argument. But moral intuition itself has a history. This is less obvious in Australia than it is in some other countries. In the US, for instance, argument about the evolving moral context of slavery is much more finely nuanced than any Australian equivalent. In this paper I will focus on the origins of Sydney University as an example of an historiographical issue in this area, interesting especially for the way it involves contemporary Christian thought – theology, new and old, is intertwined with moral intuition.



Visual media as historical evidence

Images without Texts: reading a 'Lost Civilization' through the 'painted word'
Professor Alison Betts
In a historical context where written history was destroyed by conquest, I and my research team are exploring how the multi-faceted study of images can help in proposing reconstructions of history. Analysing a unique find of early Central Asian mural art, and drawing on a number of intellectual disciplines, we consider manufacture, content and context. It is proposed that our approach may offer a useful model for other studies.

Images as Texts: the Visual as History or a History of the Visual?
Lynne Swarts
Using the visual in history is not new, but most historians are not trained to use images and often view them as illustrations of written history rather than as agents of history. How should historians use images? Is an historians’ approach to the visual different to the way the discipline of art history or archaeology approaches images? Drawing on her research project, I discuss the challenges of using the visual in history and why using images in history matters.

What do Pictures do? Art Historians, Images, and Agency
Professor Mark Ledbury
Starting with some examples drawn from my own work on Eighteenth-Century and Revolutionary French Art, I will ask a few simple but fundamental questions that still prove tricky, even for historically-minded art historians, and image-friendly historians. Can Images make a measurable historical impact? And how can it be measured? Are they doomed to be flotsam on the economic or social tide? Or are they, on the contrary, vital conduits and agents of shifts in self-representation, or even catalysts in themselves to significant historical change?



Documentary film screening: 'They Are We'
Dr Emma Christopher

To round out the semester's programme of History on Monday, we are delighted that Dr Emma Christopher has offered to share with us 'They Are We', the film she has produced as part of her 5-year ARC fellowship in the Department.

This is the non-academic version that is currently showing at film festivals, but there are numerous DVD extras for those interested in the questions it raises. It has shown around the world, won a couple of best documentary awards. This July there will be a special screening in New York sponsored by the United Nations' Remembering Slavery and the Transatlantic Slave Trade memorial, which will also feature photographs and art from the project in their gallery. In lieu of an abstract, please see the preview trailer:

View trailer here

In order both to see the film and have time for discussion, we are asking everyone to make it to this seminar as close to 12:00 pm as possible. As a thematic incentive to arrive early, we will be offering mini icecream cones until our stocks run out! Please try to join us and stay for a convivial end-of-semester chat afterwards