Professor Chris Hilliard

MA Auck AM PhD Harvard

A18 - Brennan MacCallum Building
The University of Sydney

Telephone +61 2 9036 6032
Fax +61 2 9351 3918

Website Phonebook Entry

Research interests

I am a historian of modern Britain. Much of my research has focused on literature and literary criticism in popular intellectual life. My recent work, on freedom of expression and crimes involving the written word, has taken me into legal history and social history. I have also written on New Zealand history, especially on the place of literature, historical writing, and ethnography in colonial culture.

Teaching and supervision

  • HSTY 2698: Free Speech: An International History
  • Becoming a Historian (first-year postgraduate seminar)
  • Cultural History (advanced postgraduate seminar, taught with Professor Sheila Fitzpatrick)

I supervise honours and PhD theses in modern British history and New Zealand history.

Current research students

Project title Research student
Australia, Antarctica, and the Logics of State Formation, 1839-1933 Rohan HOWITT

Current projects

I’m currently finishing a book about the Littlehampton letters case, a neighbourhood dispute involving a series of criminal libel trials and a police investigation that probed the social and cultural history of 1920s Britain. Oxford University Press is publishing The Littlehampton Libels in 2017.I’ve begun work on two new books, one about freedom of expression in Britain in the 1960s and 1970s, and the other about Peter Rachman’s London.

PhD and master's project opportunities

Selected grants

2016

  • Words and Their Consequences: Freedom of Expression in Britain, 1960-1979; Hilliard C; Australian Research Council (ARC)/Discovery Projects (DP).

2010

  • The Politics of Reading: Citizenship, Law, and Literacy in England, 1867-1960; Hilliard C; Australian Research Council (ARC)/Discovery Projects (DP).

2007

  • Complex Words: Literary Judgments in the British Commonwealth, 1920-1970; Hilliard C; Australian Research Council (ARC)/Discovery Projects (DP).

Selected publications

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Books

  • Hilliard, C. (2012). English as a Vocation: The Scrutiny Movement. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.
  • Hilliard, C. (2006). To Exercise Our Talents: The Democratization of Writing in Britain. Cambridge MA; London: Harvard University Press.

Book Chapters

  • Hilliard, C. (2016). Scrutiny abroad: literary criticism and the colonial public. In Barry Crosbie, Mark Hampton (Eds.), The cultural construction of the British world, (pp. 165-179). Manchester: Manchester University Press.
  • Hilliard, C. (2015). Publishing. In Michael Saler (Eds.), The Fin-de-Siecle World, (pp. 367-379). Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge.
  • Hilliard, C. (2012). The Native Land Court: Making Property in Nineteenth-Century New Zealand. In Saliha Belmessous (Eds.), Native Claims: Indigenous Law against Empire, 1500-1920, (pp. 204-222). New York, USA: Oxford University Press.
  • Hilliard, C. (2011). "Mind's middle distances" : men of letters in interwar New Zealand. In Kate Macdonald (Eds.), The masculine middlebrow, 1880-1950 : what Mr. Miniver read, (pp. 150-161). Basingstoke, UK: Palgrave Macmillan.
  • Hilliard, C. (2011). Working-class Fiction. In Patrick Parrinder and Andrzej Gasiorek (Eds.), The Oxford History of the Novel in English, Volume Four: The Reinvention of the British and Irish Novel 1880-1940, (pp. 522-535). Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Journals

  • Hilliard, C. (2015). Stories of an Era Not Yet So Very Remote: James Cowan in and out of New Zealand History. Journal of New Zealand Studies, NS19, 28-39.
  • Hilliard, C. (2014). Popular Reading and Social Investigation in Britain, 1850s-1940s. The Historical Journal, 57(1), 247-271. [More Information]
  • Hilliard, C. (2014). The Twopenny Library: The Book Trade, Working-Class Readers, and 'Middlebrow' Novels in Britain, 1930-42. Twentieth Century British History, 25(2), 199-220. [More Information]
  • Hilliard, C. (2013). 'Is It a Book That You Would Even Wish Your Wife or Your Servants to Read?' Obscenity Law and the Politics of Reading in Modern England. American Historical Review, 118(3), 653-678. [More Information]
  • Hilliard, C. (2012). Familiar with the Tradition: Twentieth-Century British History in Australia. Twentieth Century British History, 23(4), 529-574. [More Information]
  • Hilliard, C. (2010). Licensed Native Interpreter: The Land Purchaser as Ethnographer in Early-20th-Century New Zealand. The Journal of Pacific History, 45(2), 229-245. [More Information]
  • Hilliard, C. (2009). The Provincial Press and the Imperial Traffic in Fiction, 1870s-1930s. Journal of British Studies, 48(3), 653-673. [More Information]
  • Hilliard, C. (2008). The literary underground of 1920s London. Social History, 33(2), 164-182. [More Information]
  • Hilliard, C. (2006). Producers by Hand and by Brain: Working-Class Writers and Left-Wing Publishers in 1930s Britain. Journal of Modern History, 78(1), 37-64.
  • Hilliard, C. (2005). Modernism and the Common Writer. The Historical Journal, 48(3), 769-787.

2016

  • Hilliard, C. (2016). Scrutiny abroad: literary criticism and the colonial public. In Barry Crosbie, Mark Hampton (Eds.), The cultural construction of the British world, (pp. 165-179). Manchester: Manchester University Press.

2015

  • Hilliard, C. (2015). Publishing. In Michael Saler (Eds.), The Fin-de-Siecle World, (pp. 367-379). Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge.
  • Hilliard, C. (2015). Stories of an Era Not Yet So Very Remote: James Cowan in and out of New Zealand History. Journal of New Zealand Studies, NS19, 28-39.

2014

  • Hilliard, C. (2014). Popular Reading and Social Investigation in Britain, 1850s-1940s. The Historical Journal, 57(1), 247-271. [More Information]
  • Hilliard, C. (2014). The Twopenny Library: The Book Trade, Working-Class Readers, and 'Middlebrow' Novels in Britain, 1930-42. Twentieth Century British History, 25(2), 199-220. [More Information]

2013

  • Hilliard, C. (2013). 'Is It a Book That You Would Even Wish Your Wife or Your Servants to Read?' Obscenity Law and the Politics of Reading in Modern England. American Historical Review, 118(3), 653-678. [More Information]

2012

  • Hilliard, C. (2012). English as a Vocation: The Scrutiny Movement. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.
  • Hilliard, C. (2012). Familiar with the Tradition: Twentieth-Century British History in Australia. Twentieth Century British History, 23(4), 529-574. [More Information]
  • Hilliard, C. (2012). The Native Land Court: Making Property in Nineteenth-Century New Zealand. In Saliha Belmessous (Eds.), Native Claims: Indigenous Law against Empire, 1500-1920, (pp. 204-222). New York, USA: Oxford University Press.

2011

  • Hilliard, C. (2011). "Mind's middle distances" : men of letters in interwar New Zealand. In Kate Macdonald (Eds.), The masculine middlebrow, 1880-1950 : what Mr. Miniver read, (pp. 150-161). Basingstoke, UK: Palgrave Macmillan.
  • Hilliard, C. (2011). Working-class Fiction. In Patrick Parrinder and Andrzej Gasiorek (Eds.), The Oxford History of the Novel in English, Volume Four: The Reinvention of the British and Irish Novel 1880-1940, (pp. 522-535). Oxford: Oxford University Press.

2010

  • Hilliard, C. (2010). Licensed Native Interpreter: The Land Purchaser as Ethnographer in Early-20th-Century New Zealand. The Journal of Pacific History, 45(2), 229-245. [More Information]

2009

  • Hilliard, C. (2009). The Provincial Press and the Imperial Traffic in Fiction, 1870s-1930s. Journal of British Studies, 48(3), 653-673. [More Information]

2008

  • Hilliard, C. (2008). The literary underground of 1920s London. Social History, 33(2), 164-182. [More Information]

2006

  • Hilliard, C. (2006). Producers by Hand and by Brain: Working-Class Writers and Left-Wing Publishers in 1930s Britain. Journal of Modern History, 78(1), 37-64.
  • Hilliard, C. (2006). To Exercise Our Talents: The Democratization of Writing in Britain. Cambridge MA; London: Harvard University Press.

2005

  • Hilliard, C. (2005). Modernism and the Common Writer. The Historical Journal, 48(3), 769-787.

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