Nurchayati

PhD candidate
Supervisor: Associate Professor Michele Ford
Associate Supervisor: Dr Holly High

Life Cycle and Sociocultural Change: A Study of the Impact of Female Transnational Labour Migration on a Javanese Village
My PhD research investigates the interplay between the agency of Indonesian women and the society they inhabit by exploring transnational labour migration from the New Order era onwards. My research uses an interdisciplinary approach that highlights the interplay of self and society/culture, the interplay of time and place, and multiple-destination migration. I seek to examine the cultural, social, and human-geographical challenges that village women have faced and how they handle these challenges by using survival strategies that draw on social rules and resources. Recognising that it is only possible to understand the local and the global by examining the way they interact, I aim to show how female labour migration affects village communities. In order to do so, I analyse the changing cultural framework that these women use to interpret their world, the struggles that they have experienced in and against their changing social context, and the nature of the human agency that they have developed and deployed to attain their life goals.

About the student

I am a lecturer at the Psychology Study Program at the State University of Surabaya in Indonesia. In 1998, I earned a B.A. in psychology from Airlangga University majoring in human development. From 2008 to 2010, I pursued an M.A. at the Centre for Southeast Asian Studies at Ohio University. This major turning point in my intellectual journey changed my focus from gender and sports to gender and migration. It also marked my transition from a psychology-centred approach to an interdisciplinary perspective that combines anthropology, sociology, and geography. I am now pursuing this interdisciplinary approach under the supervision of Associate Professor Michele Ford and Dr Holly High.

Selected publications

  • Nurchayati. “Bringing Agency Back In: Indonesian Migrant Workers in Saudi Arabia.” Asian-Pacific Migration Journal 20, no. 3-4 (2011): 479-502.