Dr Christopher Chesher

BA Mitchell CAE, MA University of New South Wales, PhD Macquarie University
Coordinator of Master of Digital Communication and Culture
Postgrad Research Coordinator, Digital Cultures
Senior Lecturer

A20 - John Woolley Building
The University of Sydney

Telephone +61 2 9036 6173

Website Follow Chris on Twitter
Digital Cultures Program

Biographical details

Dr Chris Chesher is Senior Lecturer in Digital Cultures in the School of English, Art History, Film and Media.His research investigates how various information and communication technologies become historically woven through social structures and cultural practices. Examples of his writing include an Innisian evaluation of technology and knowledge over time; cultural politics of educational software; blogs and the rediscovery of authorship; the relationship of console games players to their screens, compared with TV and cinema; and an actor network analysis of patterns of mobile phone use during a U2 concert.

He is currently undertaking research into the cultures of contemporary robotics, in association with the Centre for Social Robotics at the Australian Centre for Field Robotics, University of Sydney, and writing a blog following robots.

He previously worked at the University of New South Wales, School of Media and Communications (1997-2004), Macquarie University (1995-1997), University of Technology, Sydney (1990-1994), and University of Newcastle (1993).

Research interests

  • The field of robotics raises new questions about media and technology: autonomous mining systems disrupt labour and economic flows; educational robots and toys change learning practices; service robots reframe communication and sociality; military drones and medical robots take decisions at points of life and death. Robots are media, but only after redefining media.
  • medium specificity: what makes computers distinctive as a media form? What are the social and cultural implications of media change?
  • conflicts and synergies in collaborative new media production work practices
  • computer games as an emerging set of cultural conventions, and how they are articulated into wider contexts than traditional games subcultures
  • implications of residual materiality in information technology such as 'digital dark age', environmental impacts, (Harold Innis) and forms of exclusion

Teaching and supervision

César Albarran

Adam (Ping-I) Ho

Selected publications

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Book Chapters

  • Chesher, C., Howard, S. (2012). Balancing Knowledge Management and Knowledge Mobility in the Connected University. In Tara Fenwick, Lesley Farrell (Eds.), Knowledge Mobilization and Educational Research: Politics, languages and responsibilities, (pp. 154-166). United Kingdon: Routledge imprint of Taylor & Francis.
  • Chesher, C. (2012). Between Image and Information: The iPhone Camera in the History of Photography. In Larissa Hjorth, Jean Burgess, Ingrid Richardson (Eds.), Studying Mobile Media: Cultural Technologies, Mobile Communication, and the iPhone, (pp. 98-117). New York: Routledge imprint of Taylor & Francis.
  • Chesher, C. (2006). The muse and the electronic invocator. In John Potts and Ed Scheer (Eds.), Technologies of magic: a cultural study of ghosts, machines and the uncanny, (pp. 125-140). University of Sydney: Power Publications.
  • Chesher, C. (2001). An Inventory of Australian Net Culture, Criticism and Theory. Politics of a Digital Present: An Inventory of Australian Net Culture. Melbourne: Fibreculture Publications.
  • Chesher, C., Genosko, G. (2001). Digitising the beat: police databases and incorporeal transformations. Deleuze and Guattari: Critical Assessments of Leading Philosophers. United States: Routledge imprint of Taylor & Francis.
  • Chesher, C. (2001). What is new media research? Politics of a Digital Present: An Inventory of Australian Net Culture. Melbourne: Fibreculture Publications.

Journals

  • Chesher, C. (2013). Mining Robotics and Media Change. M/C Journal: A Journal of Media and Culture, 16(2), 1-9.
  • Chesher, C. (2012). Navigating sociotechnical spaces: comparing computer games and sat navs as digital spatial media. Convergence: the international journal of research into new media technologies, 18(3), 315-330. [More Information]
  • Wilson, J., Chesher, C., Hjorth, L., Richardson, I. (2011). Distractedly Engaged: Mobile Gaming and Convergent Mobile Media. Convergence, 17(4), 351-355. [More Information]
  • Chesher, C. (2009). Binding time in digital civilisations: Re-evaluating Innis after new media. Global Media Journal: Australian Edition, 3(1), 1-17.
  • Chesher, C. (2007). Becoming the Milky Way: Mobile Phones and Actor Networks at a U2 Concert. Continuum: Journal of Media and Cultural Studies, 21(2), 217-225.
  • Crawford, A., Kucklich, J., Chesher, C. (2006). Gaming Networks. FibrecultureJournal: internet theory criticism research, Issue 8(2006), 1-5.
  • Chesher, C. (2004). Connection unbound by location. Griffith Review, 3.
  • Chesher, C. (2004). Neither gaze nor glance, but glaze: relating to console game screens. Scan (Sydney): journal of media arts culture, 1(1), 1-8.
  • Chesher, C., Costello, B. (2004). Why Media Scholars Should not Study Computer Games. Media International Australia Incorporating Culture and Policy: quarterly journal of media research and resources, 110, 5-9.
  • Chesher, C. (2002). Why the digital computer is dead. Ctheory.
  • Chesher, C. (2001). Console games and the glaze. Scan (Sydney): journal of media arts culture, , 30-37.

Edited Journals

  • Chesher, C., Marks, P., Cleland, K. (2008). Screenscapes. Scan (Sydney): journal of media arts culture.
  • Chesher, C., Crawford, A., Kucklich, J. (2006). Fibreculture Journal; special edition: Gaming Networks. FibrecultureJournal: internet theory criticism research, 8(2006).
  • Chesher, C., Costello, B. (2004). Media International Australia. Media International Australia Incorporating Culture and Policy: quarterly journal of media research and resources, 110.

Conferences

  • Chesher, C. (2012). FURO at Robotworld: human-robot metacommunication and media studies. ANZCA 2012 ADELAIDE: Communicating Change and Changing Communication in the 21s Century, Adelaide, Australia: Australian and New Zealand Communication Association.
  • Chesher, C. (2012). Robots Searching in Belief Space: Field Robots and their Contingent Encodings of Unknown Environments. CODE: A Media, Games & Art Conference, Melbourne: Swinburne University of Technology.
  • Chesher, C. (2009). Converging mediations of space in computer games and spatial navigation systems. Sixth Australasian Conference on Interactive Entertainment (IE09), New York, USA: ACM Digital Library. [More Information]
  • Chesher, C. (2008). Binding time: Harold Innis and the balance of new media. Philosophy of the Information Society 30th International Ludwig Wittgenstein Symposium, Frankfurt; Paris; Lancaster; New Brunswick: Ontos Verlag.
  • Chesher, C. (2005). Blogs and the crisis of authorship. Blogtalk Downunder, Sydney: incsub (Incorporated Subversion).
  • Chesher, C. (2005). Force and voice in new media art. Minds, Bodies, Machines: a cultural and intellectual history of 21st century technologies, Australia: Open Mind Journals.
  • Chesher, C. (2004). How to tell apart video games and new media art. Interaction: Systems, Practice and Theory A Creativity & Cognition Symposium, NSW: Creativity and Cognition Studios Press, University of Technology Sydney.
  • Chesher, C. (2004). Hyperlink as invocationary act. Australia and New Zealand Association of Communication Researchers, Australia: Australia and New Zealand Association of Communication Researchers.
  • Chesher, C. (2004). Invocation, evocation and avocation in new media art. 15th Annual European Association of Labour Economics Conference. Elsevier.

Reference Works

  • Chesher, C. (2014). Robotics. In Michael Kelly (Eds.), Encyclopedia of Aesthetics. Oxford University Press.
  • Chesher, C. (2006). Multi-media. Blackwell Encyclopedia of Sociology. Blackwell Publishers.

Other

  • Chesher, C. (2006), Game screens: not the gaze, nor the glance, but the glaze.
  • Chesher, C. (2006), The power of social networks.
  • Chesher, C. (2006), Topologies of desire, sensation and affect in computer games and new media art.

2014

  • Chesher, C. (2014). Robotics. In Michael Kelly (Eds.), Encyclopedia of Aesthetics. Oxford University Press.

2013

  • Chesher, C. (2013). Mining Robotics and Media Change. M/C Journal: A Journal of Media and Culture, 16(2), 1-9.

2012

  • Chesher, C., Howard, S. (2012). Balancing Knowledge Management and Knowledge Mobility in the Connected University. In Tara Fenwick, Lesley Farrell (Eds.), Knowledge Mobilization and Educational Research: Politics, languages and responsibilities, (pp. 154-166). United Kingdon: Routledge imprint of Taylor & Francis.
  • Chesher, C. (2012). Between Image and Information: The iPhone Camera in the History of Photography. In Larissa Hjorth, Jean Burgess, Ingrid Richardson (Eds.), Studying Mobile Media: Cultural Technologies, Mobile Communication, and the iPhone, (pp. 98-117). New York: Routledge imprint of Taylor & Francis.
  • Chesher, C. (2012). FURO at Robotworld: human-robot metacommunication and media studies. ANZCA 2012 ADELAIDE: Communicating Change and Changing Communication in the 21s Century, Adelaide, Australia: Australian and New Zealand Communication Association.
  • Chesher, C. (2012). Navigating sociotechnical spaces: comparing computer games and sat navs as digital spatial media. Convergence: the international journal of research into new media technologies, 18(3), 315-330. [More Information]
  • Chesher, C. (2012). Robots Searching in Belief Space: Field Robots and their Contingent Encodings of Unknown Environments. CODE: A Media, Games & Art Conference, Melbourne: Swinburne University of Technology.

2011

  • Wilson, J., Chesher, C., Hjorth, L., Richardson, I. (2011). Distractedly Engaged: Mobile Gaming and Convergent Mobile Media. Convergence, 17(4), 351-355. [More Information]

2009

  • Chesher, C. (2009). Binding time in digital civilisations: Re-evaluating Innis after new media. Global Media Journal: Australian Edition, 3(1), 1-17.
  • Chesher, C. (2009). Converging mediations of space in computer games and spatial navigation systems. Sixth Australasian Conference on Interactive Entertainment (IE09), New York, USA: ACM Digital Library. [More Information]

2008

  • Chesher, C. (2008). Binding time: Harold Innis and the balance of new media. Philosophy of the Information Society 30th International Ludwig Wittgenstein Symposium, Frankfurt; Paris; Lancaster; New Brunswick: Ontos Verlag.
  • Chesher, C., Marks, P., Cleland, K. (2008). Screenscapes. Scan (Sydney): journal of media arts culture.

2007

  • Chesher, C. (2007). Becoming the Milky Way: Mobile Phones and Actor Networks at a U2 Concert. Continuum: Journal of Media and Cultural Studies, 21(2), 217-225.

2006

  • Chesher, C., Crawford, A., Kucklich, J. (2006). Fibreculture Journal; special edition: Gaming Networks. FibrecultureJournal: internet theory criticism research, 8(2006).
  • Chesher, C. (2006), Game screens: not the gaze, nor the glance, but the glaze.
  • Crawford, A., Kucklich, J., Chesher, C. (2006). Gaming Networks. FibrecultureJournal: internet theory criticism research, Issue 8(2006), 1-5.
  • Chesher, C. (2006). Multi-media. Blackwell Encyclopedia of Sociology. Blackwell Publishers.
  • Chesher, C. (2006). The muse and the electronic invocator. In John Potts and Ed Scheer (Eds.), Technologies of magic: a cultural study of ghosts, machines and the uncanny, (pp. 125-140). University of Sydney: Power Publications.
  • Chesher, C. (2006), The power of social networks.
  • Chesher, C. (2006), Topologies of desire, sensation and affect in computer games and new media art.

2005

  • Chesher, C. (2005). Blogs and the crisis of authorship. Blogtalk Downunder, Sydney: incsub (Incorporated Subversion).
  • Chesher, C. (2005). Force and voice in new media art. Minds, Bodies, Machines: a cultural and intellectual history of 21st century technologies, Australia: Open Mind Journals.

2004

  • Chesher, C. (2004). Connection unbound by location. Griffith Review, 3.
  • Chesher, C. (2004). How to tell apart video games and new media art. Interaction: Systems, Practice and Theory A Creativity & Cognition Symposium, NSW: Creativity and Cognition Studios Press, University of Technology Sydney.
  • Chesher, C. (2004). Hyperlink as invocationary act. Australia and New Zealand Association of Communication Researchers, Australia: Australia and New Zealand Association of Communication Researchers.
  • Chesher, C. (2004). Invocation, evocation and avocation in new media art. 15th Annual European Association of Labour Economics Conference. Elsevier.
  • Chesher, C., Costello, B. (2004). Media International Australia. Media International Australia Incorporating Culture and Policy: quarterly journal of media research and resources, 110.
  • Chesher, C. (2004). Neither gaze nor glance, but glaze: relating to console game screens. Scan (Sydney): journal of media arts culture, 1(1), 1-8.
  • Chesher, C., Costello, B. (2004). Why Media Scholars Should not Study Computer Games. Media International Australia Incorporating Culture and Policy: quarterly journal of media research and resources, 110, 5-9.

2002

  • Chesher, C. (2002). Why the digital computer is dead. Ctheory.

2001

  • Chesher, C. (2001). An Inventory of Australian Net Culture, Criticism and Theory. Politics of a Digital Present: An Inventory of Australian Net Culture. Melbourne: Fibreculture Publications.
  • Chesher, C. (2001). Console games and the glaze. Scan (Sydney): journal of media arts culture, , 30-37.
  • Chesher, C., Genosko, G. (2001). Digitising the beat: police databases and incorporeal transformations. Deleuze and Guattari: Critical Assessments of Leading Philosophers. United States: Routledge imprint of Taylor & Francis.
  • Chesher, C. (2001). What is new media research? Politics of a Digital Present: An Inventory of Australian Net Culture. Melbourne: Fibreculture Publications.

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