Podcasts

  • Affirming Indigenous Knowledge as the Social Capital of Indigenous Peoples

    9 December, 2011

    Channel:
    Sydney Ideas
    Presented by:
    Artist:
    Les Malezer, Co-chair Elect of the National Congress of Australia's First Peoples

    The Keynote Lecture of indigenous Knowledges in Latin America and Australia Symposium. On the occasion of International Human Rights Day, Les Malezer discusses how Aboriginal Peoples and Torres Strait Islander Peoples have greater capacity to take advantage of the legal opportunities and build social capital through Indigenous Knowledges; and why this is crucial for their future.

    • 1 hour, 27 mins
    • Download (MP3, 80.4Mb)
  • The INAUGURAL Warren Hogan Memorial Lecture By Mr Glenn Stevens, Governor, Reserve Bank of Australia.

    8 December, 2011

    Channel:
    Alumni
    Presented by:
    Artist:
    Mr Glenn Stevens, Governor, Reserve Bank of Australia

    The Warren Hogan Lecture is to be an annual series devoted to the economic analysis of public policy issues. It commemorates Warren Pat Hogan (1929-2009), Professor of Economics in the University of Sydney, 1968-1998. Mr Glenn Stevens, Governor of the Reserve Bank of Australia, reflects on the lasting contribution Warren Hogan had to financial thought, as well as asking key questions, such as what responsibilities do countries with high monetary reserves have to nations in financial trouble.

    • 1 hour, 14 mins
    • Download (MP3, 41.6Mb)
  • The Development of Human Rights and its Mechanisms in ASEAN

    6 December, 2011

    Channel:
    Sydney Ideas
    Presented by:
    Artist:
    Dr Sriprapha Petcharamesree

    There is much talk about human rights in Australia but there is not a great deal know about what is happening in the region. Dr Sriprapha is an academic, human rights advocate and the Thai representative on the new ASEAN Intergovernmental Commission on Human Rights, and provides a comprehensive observation on human rights within the ASEAN group of countries, where the common perception is that it is an issue for internal affairs.

  • Strong Society, Smart State: The Rise of Public Opinion in China's Japan Policy.

    22 November, 2011

    Channel:
    Sydney Ideas
    Presented by:
    Artist:
    Dr James Reilly, Dept of Government and International Relations, University of Sydney

    To what extent does public opinion influence policy in the authoritarian state like China? China scholar James Reilly examines the interplay of public opinion and growing political activism, with the rhetoric, negotiating stances and policy decisions of China towards Japan in the last decade, to provide a nuanced insight into the complex politics of the new China.

  • Editors, Journalists and Audiences: Towards a new compact

    16 November, 2011

    Channel:
    Sydney Ideas
    Presented by:
    Artist:
    Peter Fray, First Decade Fellow, Department of Media and Communications, University of Sydney, and editor-in-chief and publisher of The Sydney Morning Herald and The Sun-Herald

    If audiences deserve and want better journalism, how can it change? Peter Fray's wide-ranging lecture asks many questions about transformation in the media sector, and calls for a new compact between editors, journalists and audiences, a new way of thinking that includes the public good, collaboration, diversity, and accountability and transparency.

    • 1 hour, 17 mins
    • Download (MP3, 35.5Mb)
  • Governing Conduct in the Age of the Brain

    15 November, 2011

    Channel:
    Sydney Ideas
    Presented by:
    Artist:
    Professor Nikolas Rose, James Martin White Professor of Sociology, London School of Economics

    "How did neuroscience move out of the laboratory and into our everyday life... are we undergoing a change in our very sense of ourselves, of what we think we are as human beings, and if so, with what consequences?" Foundational scholar on the relationship between the social sciences and biomedicine, Nikolas Rose, calls on us to "seize on the new openness provided by new conceptions of the nueromolecular, social and plastic brain."

    • 1 hour, 20 mins
    • Download (MP3, 73.4Mb)
  • The Bliss of Solitude

    10 November, 2011

    Channel:
    Alumni
    Artist:
    Professor Barry Spurr, Professor of Poetry and Poetics

    Poetry of the solitary state abounds, variously expressing the poets' own lives, ideological convictions, historical contexts and the sheer counter-cultural appeal of representing a human condition which, increasingly in Western society, is regarded as pathological. Poetry of solitude (blissful and otherwise) reveals a rich vein of thought and artistry, thematically arresting and technically compelling, from a range of authors over the several centuries of English verse. How do poets present solitude in contrasting historical periods? What are the different kinds of poetically-constructed solitude? Do men and women write differently about it? Does it have discernible, quantifiable influence on the technical matters of word-choice, imagery and prosody?

    • 1 hour, 10 mins
    • Download (MP3, 81.2Mb)
  • Latin America and China: Beyond Trade and Investments?

    1 November, 2011

    Channel:
    Sydney Ideas
    Presented by:
    Artist:
    Professor Enrique Dussel Peters, National Autonomous University in Mexico (UNAM)

    In recent years, the direct foreign investment of more than 30 billion dollars of Chinese private and public companies in Latin America has created a boom orientated towards raw materials and energy. Bolivia alone has 50% of the world's lithium supplies. As China goes shopping in Latin America, how can all governments negotiate hard, introduce structural programs of cooperation and ensure long-term harmonious relations? Mexican economist Enrique Dussel Peters provides a comprehensive overview of the issues, and calls for a strategic regional agenda of Latin America towards China.

    • 1 hour, 17 mins
    • Download (MP3, 35.7Mb)
  • Make a Better Door: Or, how does digital humanism humanise?

    25 October, 2011

    Channel:
    Sydney Ideas
    Presented by:
    Artist:
    Professor Stuart Moulthrop, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

    Electronic literature pioneer Stuart Moulthrop offers a meditation on how the digital humanities humanise and the user as digital subject, including these thoughts; "We are never more human, digital or otherwise, than when we find ourselves in a loop. Whether that loop brings us some place like home, or if indeed, we can keep our various economic and ecological feedbacks viable in a cycle, remains for the digital subject, very much the object of the game."

  • Beautiful Suffering: The image of catastrophe

    25 October, 2011

    Channel:
    Sydney Ideas
    Presented by:
    Artist:
    Professor Emerita Abigail Solomon-Godeau, University of California, Santa Barbara

    Art historian Abigail Solomon-Godeau looks at the politics of representation and the ethics of presentation in images of suffering in modern art photography. She says "When art photographers take catastrophe as their subject, their brief is not necessarily to do with the provision of information or verification, but this does not absolve them, if their work is to avoid the exploitative, from producing some kind of knowledge, a certain kind of viewing".

    • 1 hour, 26 mins
    • Download (MP3, 39.5Mb)
  • The Griffins' Canberra, Burnham's Chicago, Garnier's Lyon: The Perfect City on the Edge of World War

    21 October, 2011

    Channel:
    Sydney Ideas
    Presented by:
    Artist:
    Professor David Theodore Van Zanten, Mary Jane Crowe Professor in Art and Art History, Northwestern University, USA

    Highly esteemed architectural historian Professor David Van Zanten shares his early research on a project he has just begun - a comparison of the drawings of Walter Burley Griffin and Marion Mahony on Canberra, the drawings that survive of the 1909 Plan for Chicago by Daniel Burnham, then the drawing of the famous drawings for his Cité Industrielle by the Lyon architect Tony Garnier,published in 1917. He believes there was a social ethos that they all shared, an ethos that we are only just beginning to map.

    • 1 hour, 14 mins
    • Download (MP3, 34.3Mb)
  • Faith and Development: A One Just World Forum at the University of Sydney

    19 October, 2011

    Channel:
    Sydney Ideas
    Presented by:
    Artist:
    Professor David Theodore Van Zanten, Mary Jane Crowe Professor in Art and Art History, Northwestern University, USA

    A lively forum and discussion on the role of faith-based NGOs in the international aid and development sector. It includes a video interview with Dr Catherin Hamlin AC, founder the Addis Ababa Fistula Hospital.

    • 1 hour, 16 mins
    • Download (MP3, 35.2Mb)
  • From Thought as an Occupation to Some Thoughts on the Occupation

    18 October, 2011

    Channel:
    Sydney Ideas
    Presented by:
    Artist:
    Professor McKenzie Wark, Media and Cultural Studies, The New School, New York City

    US-based cultural theorist McKenzie Wark draws on his latest research on the legends of the origins of Situationist International, a aesthetico-political avant garde of Paris in the 1950s, and links this to his personal observations of Occupy Wall St in Zuccotti Park, and his visit to Occupy Sydney in Martin Place earlier that day.

    • 1 hour, 19 mins
    • Download (MP3, 36.3Mb)
  • James Ferguson: Globalisation, inequality and social imaginaries

    12 October, 2011

    Channel:
    Sydney Ideas
    Presented by:
    Artist:
    Dr Gaynor Macdonald, Department of Anthropology, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences

    Gaynor Macdonald reviews the work of contemporary American social anthropologist James Ferguson, and his work on the impact of the global economy in Africa in particular. She relates his contributions to her research in Australia with indigenous groups.

    • 1 hour, 18 mins
    • Download (MP3, 36.0Mb)
  • The Buddha's Middle Way: in defense of fine clothes, good food, and beautiful monasteries

    11 October, 2011

    Channel:
    Sydney Ideas
    Presented by:
    Artist:
    Professor Karen Lang, Professor of Indian Religions in the Department of Religious Studies, University of Virginia

    Professor Lang is 2011 University Buddhist Education Foundation Visiting Professor of Buddhist Studies at the University of Sydney. Her talk for Sydney Ideas examines original texts of Buddhist teachers on material comfort, and the contrast of Buddhist monastic behaviour with the prevailing Jain ascetics traditions of the time.

    • 1 hour, 27 mins
    • Download (MP3, 39.7Mb)
  • Anthropology in the Time of Climate Change

    6 October, 2011

    Channel:
    Alumni
    Artist:
    Professor Linda Connor, Professor of Anthropology

    How can Anthropology contribute to a critical understanding of anthropogenic climate change, a potentially catastrophic process of planetary dimensions? Citizens of a globalized world, enmeshed in a Faustian bargain with nature to achieve transcendence through material wealth and consumer satisfactions, confront the prospect of a warmed, entropic and resource-scarce future. Anthropology's comparative method of cultural analysis suggests new and productive ways of thinking about humanity's visioning of immortality, death, survival and politics in the time of climate change.

    • 1 hour, 17 mins
    • Download (MP3, 70.7Mb)
  • Inaugural Confucius Lecture - Political Legitimacy in China: A Confucian Perspective

    5 October, 2011

    Channel:
    Sydney Ideas
    Presented by:
    Artist:
    Professor Daniel A. Bell, Jiaotong University (Shanghai) and Tsinghua University (Beijing)

    For the Inaugural Confucius Lecture, highly respected scholar Professor Daniel Bell charts a possible role for Confucianism in modern Chinese society. He includes a review of its history, particularly the Confucian concern with poverty, and examines proposals to reconcile political meritocracy with democracy in contemporary China.

    • 1 hour, 30 mins
    • Download (MP3, 41.4Mb)
  • Malthus and the New World: Peopling America and Australia

    18 August, 2011

    Channel:
    Alumni
    Artist:
    Professor Alison Bashford, Professor of Modern History

    Food security is back on the global public sphere's agenda, and so, therefore, is Robert Malthus. People love him or loathe him, but few have asked what Malthus thought about Australia. The new colony of New South Wales in fact formed a founding case on which Britain's original political economist built his late eighteenth-century ideas on population. His next case was the new United States of America; the thirteen colonies-turned-republic, located on the edge of another vast continent. Just what did Malthus think about these very different New Worlds, their original inhabitants, and the prospects for newcomers? This lecture brings recent scholarship on colonial history, gender history, and environmental history to Malthus's famous Essay on the Principle of Population, and in the process asks how the population and ecological histories of Australia and America might be rethought.

  • History and the Individual Life

    28 July, 2011

    Channel:
    Alumni
    Artist:
    Professor Barbara Caine, Head of School of Philosophical and Historical Inquiry

    The extraordinary recent interest in both autobiography and biography that is evident amongst the general reading public can be seen at a scholarly level as well and there is now much discussion of the "biographical turn" within the humanities and social sciences. Nowhere is this more evident than in History as many historians engage in biographical study in a variety of different ways. But the relationship between history and biography has long been a troubled one and the difficulties continue as some historians seek to establish the similarities and differences between history and biography and the limitations of focusing on an individual life – while others explore the best and most fruitful ways to incorporate individual lives and life stories within historical writing. This lecture will explore the changing nature of this debate over the past few decades while looking also at some of the new ways in which historians are approaching and drawing on individual lives.

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