Department of Political Economy Seminar Series

Semester 1, 2015

26 February 2015 - 4 - 5.30pm
Presenter/Affiliation: Professor Stuart Elden
Warwick University
Title: Foucault’s Third Course on Governmentality
Abstract:
Venue: Darlington Centre Boardroom, H02 [map]


12 March 2015 - 4 - 5.30pm
Presenter/Affiliation: Dr Tim Anderson
University of Sydney
Title: From Havana to Quito: understanding economic reform in Cuba and Ecuador
Abstract: This paper considers the persuasive force of early impressions of other cultures, and the problems similar rapid impressions may pose for political economic analysis. Cuba and Ecuador are countries involved in substantial economic change yet, despite close ties between the two and some important common history, the processes of reform are quite different. Those differences are clearly conditioned by their distinct histories, yet political and economic modernism often misses that. One result is that processes of change are often poorly characterised and important misconceptions creep in. Through these two examples this paper argues that, when considering political economic change in other cultures, we should have regard to sufficient detail of their contingent histories and to the key ideas developed in relation to those histories. It also characterises the key features of reform in Cuba and Ecuador, noting some common misconceptions as well as achievements and challenges.
Click here to download the PowerPoint Slide in PDF
Venue: Darlington Centre Boardroom, H02 [map]


26 March 2015 - 4 - 5.30pm
Presenter/Affiliation: Dr Ben Spies-Butcher
Macquarie University
Title: Can Care Work Help Us Change Track? Revisiting the post-industrial thesis and comparative welfare analysis
Abstract: The organization and provision of care work has been transformed in the transition to a post-industrial economy. This has particular implications for the organization of the welfare state and the division between public and private provision. While acknowledging the importance of care to understandings of welfare, Esping-Andersen earlier reaffirmed his ‘three-worlds’ categorization of advanced economies, arguing differences between national economic institutions remained relatively stable over time. This article re-visits Esping-Andersen’s analysis to examine how the growing economic importance of paid care may contribute to a broader reshaping of economic institutions, particularly in liberal welfare regimes. Citing evidence from across the advanced Anglo Saxon countries, but particularly Australia, it argues that the incorporation of care into markets poses particular challenges, which may allow for a greater level of political contestation, and thus for economies to transition between ‘worlds’. This analysis places care at the centre of important developments in the broader economy, and as a core concern of economic policy makers.
Venue: Darlington Centre Boardroom, H02 [map]


16 April 2015 - 4 - 5.30pm
Presenter/Affiliation: Associate Professor Melinda Cooper
University of Sydney
Title: Family Values: Between Neoliberalism and Neoconservatism
Abstract:
Venue: Darlington Centre Boardroom, H02 [map]


30 April 2015 - 4 - 5.30pm
Presenter/Affiliation: Phillip Roberts
University of Sydney
Title: The Brazilian Landless Workers Movement: From Agrarian Reform to Post-Neoliberalism
Abstract:
Venue: Darlington Centre Boardroom, H02 [map]


14 May 2015 - 4 - 5.30pm
Presenter/Affiliation: Professor Barry Carr
La Trobe University
Title: TBC
Abstract:
Venue: Darlington Centre Boardroom, H02 [map]


28 May 2015 - 4 - 5.30pm
Presenter/Affiliation: Professor Jacqui True
Monash University
Title: TBC
Abstract:
Venue: Darlington Centre Boardroom, H02 [map]