Symposiums

RECASTING THE QUESTION: DIGITAL APPROACHES IN ART HISTORY AND MUSEUMS

Recasting


A day-long symposium exploring the application of digitally-based methods to the study and presentation of art and architecture in universities and museums.

Presented by the Power Institute, University of Sydney, and the Research School of Humanities and the Arts, Australian National University, with support from the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, University of Sydney; Asia Art Archive; the Centre for Digital Humanities Research, Australian National University; and the Department of Art History, University of Sydney.

DATE:

Thursday 5 November, 2015
9am - 5.30pm

VENUE:

CCANESA
Level 3, the Madsen Building (F09)
The University of Sydney
CCANESA is a conference room located in the Madsen Building. The Madsen Building is located on the left hand side of the Eastern Avenue pedestrian mall when entering campus from City Road.

OUTLINE:

Digital approaches occupy an increasingly important place in the discipline of art history today. Yet their potential remains largely untapped by many in the field. What becomes possible in terms of substantive change in art historical research and understanding? How do these tools change not only the outcomes of our research (i.e., generating new insight or perspectives) but how we think about the material we work upon? What new opportunities for engagement with cultural heritage are made possible by the digital, both within and beyond the museum? How might the digital impact pedagogy, and what careers in the arts should we be preparing our students for? Do these new methods mean leaving behind the approaches of the past, or is there room for both the digital and the analog in art history?

Recasting the Question: Digital Approaches in Art History and Museums is a day-long symposium exploring the application of digitally-based methods to the study and presentation of art and architecture in universities and museums. Bringing together international experts in digital art history and exhibition with leaders in the field in Australia, Recasting the Question offers the opportunity to explore the critical and scholarly issues that animate this emerging discipline through a series of projects focused on art and architecture from Australia and around the world.

Speakers will use current research projects as jump off points for thinking through the ideas and issues that stand behind their projects and how those ideas have evolved from (or relate to) the field as it has conventionally been known and practiced.

PROGRAM:

Please click here to download the full program with abstracts and speakers' biographies.

ASIAN ART RESEARCH IN AUSTRALIA AND NEW ZEALAND: PAST, PRESENT, FUTURE

AAR


A day-long symposium with leading scholars and curators from across institutions, fields, and practices who will come together to explore the study of Asian art in Australia and New Zealand.

Organized by the Power Institute and Department of Art History at the University of Sydney.

DATE:

Thursday 15 October, 2015
8.45am - 6pm

VENUE:

Woolley Common Room N480
John Woolley Building, Science Road
Camperdown Campus, The University of Sydney
MAP

OUTLINE:

Since at least the 1940s, Asia has become an increasingly important point of orientation for Australia and New Zealand: politically, economically, demographically, and, of course, culturally. In this context, there has long been strong public interest in Asian art, sustaining dedicated galleries, significant original exhibitions, specialist organisations, arts festivals, and numerous exchange programmes. Nonetheless, the study of Asian art in Australia and New Zealand appears stubbornly diffuse. Australia and New Zealand boast successive generations of specialists working as educators, curators, researchers, artists, and ever growing numbers of students, yet we often remain separated by discipline, geography, institutional structures, and the variable resources that characterize local museum and library collections.

Asian Art Research in Australia and New Zealand: Past, Present, Future brings together scholars and curators from across institutions, fields, and practices to explore the particular historical developments that have come to constitute the study of Asian art in Australia and New Zealand.

This day long symposium presents new research by both emerging practitioners and senior members of the field, through which participants will investigate the historiography of Asian art in Australia and New Zealand, assessing our achievements and the current state of the field, so as to better consider future directions.

PROGRAM:

Please click here to download the full program with abstracts and speakers' biographies.

PAST SYMPOSIUM: Tilting the World

TILTING THE WORLD: HISTORIES OF MODERN AND CONTEMPORARY ASIAN ART



















Organized by the Power Institute, University of Sydney, and the Art Gallery of New South Wales.

DATES

Friday 29 November, 2013 | University of Sydney
Saturday 30 November, 2013 | Art Gallery of New South Wales

OUTLINE

The Power Institute in partnership with the Art Gallery of New South Wales, is proud to present Tilting the World: Histories of Modern and Contemporary Asian Art. Tilting the World is an ambitious symposium, which will bring to Sydney international experts and emerging scholars to discuss the past, present and future of Asian art. Collectively, this symposium asks: what is at stake in the study of modern and contemporary Asian art cultures today, particularly as we head into what is being styled “the Asian Century”?

This significant event has been organised to honour the career of Professor John Clark, who retires this year from the department. For over twenty years Professor Clark has pioneered, and indeed shaped, the field of modern and contemporary Asian art history. This has been achieved particularly through the production of influential, globally recognized reference texts such as Modern Asian Art (1998), and by his direct nurturing and encouragement of several generations of scholars and curators who are now at the forefront of this burgeoning field. True to this spirit, the symposium looks to the future, highlighting the vital current research being developed by early career scholars, both in Australia and from around the world, active as researchers, curators and critics. Tilting the World signals the belief that new approaches to these vital aspects of Asian cultural histories are central to understanding our world.

Reflecting an understanding of the cultural richness and complexity of Asian modernities, the symposium features cross-disciplinary approaches, encompassing art history, sociology, anthropology, media and visual cultural studies, which highlight the layered richness of cultural experience within, between and beyond nations. Keynote speakers who have worked with Professor Clark over the years have been invited to indicate the breadth of his research legacy. Tilting the World is a free event, and a full list of speakers including keynote, can be found below. A selection of papers will also be published after the symposium as a peer-reviewed volume by Power Publications.

DOWNLOAD PROGRAM

Please download the program with abstracts here

The symposium was proudly presented by the Power Institute in partnership with the Art Gallery of NSW.

We gratefully acknowledge the support of Sabrina Snow and the Japan Foundation for this event.

Image (detail): Wadachi Tomo-o, Self-portrait with Spectacles, 1923, oil on canvas, The Museum of Modern Art, Kamakura & Hayama.

PAST SYMPOSIUM: The Bernard Smith Symposium

The Bernard Smith Symposium


DATES

Thursday 20 – Friday 21 September, 2012 | Australian Institute of Art History, University of Melbourne
Friday 9 – Saturday 10 November, 2012 | Power Institute, University of Sydney and Art Gallery of New South Wales

A COLLABORATIVE INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM

Bernard Smith could be said to have established Australian Art History. His work was seminal for histories of Pacific encounter and he also was also author to some of the country’s most eloquent memoirs. The Symposium brought together an international field of scholars from art history, anthropology, history and literature, as well as curators and writers, to discuss all aspects of Bernard Smith’s wide-ranging work and explore and assess its impact and legacy.

The symposium has now concluded after an extremely successful two days in Melbourne and Sydney respectively. The Power Institute thanks all speakers, attendees and partners for their participation in the event. A selection of images from the symposium in Sydney on Friday 9 November, can be viewed at our image gallery here.

DOWNLOAD PROGRAM

The full program including abstracts can be downloaded here:

MELBOURNE PROGRAM (PDF)
SYDNEY PROGRAM (PDF)

The symposium was proudly presented by the Power Institute and the University of Sydney in partnership with the University of Melbourne and the Art Gallery of NSW.

University of Melbourne
Art Gallery of NSW

Images of Bernard Smith courtesy of Kate Challis