Junior Research Fellows

Catherine Bishop

Catherine Bishop

Catherine Bishop, Kathleen Fitzpatrick Junior Research Fellow, has a PhD in History from the Australian National University. Her research interests include Australasian, colonial and international history with a particular focus on gender. Her project for the Laureate Research Program in International History will investigate the International Federation of Business and Professional Women, to understand how and why business and professional women positioned themselves as international political and economic players in the twentieth century world. It will interrogate the development of the idea of the ‘businesswoman’ through analysing local, national and international networks.

This project uses biographical and social history lenses and builds on her previous PhD research into businesswomen in colonial cities in Australia and New Zealand. She has published several book chapters and articles, including in History Australia (2014), Law and History Review (2015) and the Journal of Women’s History (2016). Her first book, Minding Her Own Business: Colonial Businesswomen in Sydney, (New South Publishing, 2015) won the 2016 Ashurst Business Literature Prize. Her article ‘When Your Money is Not Your Own’, (Law and History Review) won the Australian Women’s History Network Mary Bennett Prize for the best article in women’s history by an early career researcher in 2016. Her thesis won the 2012 ANU Gender Institute PhD Thesis Prize for Excellence in Gender Research and was Highly Commended in the Australian Women’s and Gender Studies Association PhD Award. The publication of her first book was supported by both the City of Sydney and the Australian Academy of the Humanities, while the writing of her second, about New Zealand's colonial businesswomen, was enabled by a New Zealand History Trust Award.

Catherine has been a member of the Australian Historical Association Executive Committee and was the recipient of an Australian Academy of the Humanities Travelling Fellowship for 2015-2016 for her international history project. She was also the 2016 Australian Religious History Fellow at the State Library of New South Wales for another book project about an early twentieth-century female missionary to Aborigines.

Recent and Forthcoming Talks
  • Armidale Family History Seminar Day, Armidale NSW, 21 October 2017
  • Scholarly Musings, State Library of NSW, 5 September 2017
  • Parramatta Historical Society, 16 August 2017
  • Orange Readers and Writers' Festival, Orange NSW, 22 July 2017
  • Waverton Probus, 15 May 2017
  • St George's Historical Society, Rockdale, 22 April 2017
  • Women's Day Talk, History Council Speaker Connect Program, 8 March 2017

Marigold Black

Marigold Black

Marigold Black, Kathleen Fitzpatrick Junior Research Fellow in the Laureate Research Program in International History, is an historian of ideas interested in the history of international law with a particular focus on the American experience.

Marigold commenced her undergraduate studies at the University of Newcastle, and completed Honours and a PhD at the University of Sydney. Her doctoral thesis, entitled The Nature of a State in a State of Nature: The Earliest Imaginings of American Sovereignty 1765-1776, examined colonial perspectives of sovereignty on the eve of the American Revolution, and the importance of those ideas for understanding the pre-history of the United States Constitution.

As a Junior Research Fellow, she will undertake a project on the relationship between the doctrine of 'Free Seas' and the idea of a world economy from The Hague Peace Conference in 1899 through to the UN Conventions on the Law of the Sea in the 1950s. This project will focus on the practical and moral implications of the principle that the oceans are international territory and should be free for all seafaring trade. Bringing questions of commercial interest and international trade together with the objects of international law, it will provide an additional context for interpreting, and understanding, the idea of a world economy.


Garritt (Chip) Van Dyk

Garritt (Chip) Van Dyk

Garritt Van Dyk, Kathleen Fitzpatrick Junior Research Fellow, is a PhD Candidate in the School of Philosophical and Historical Inquiry at the University of Sydney. His doctoral thesis, entitled Commerce, Food, and Identity in Seventeenth-century England and France, examines the role that commerce has played in the transmission of ideas, including the relationship between food and identity, using economic history to examine both commercial and cultural exchange in the trading networks of England and France. As a Junior Research Fellow, he will commence a project on International Networks and the Creation of an Australian Banking System. This project will focus on the individuals responsible for the development of the Australian Banking system, investigating their relationship to international networks centred in Britain, but also exploring the roles of early bankers as social reformers, community leaders and philanthropists.

Garritt completed his undergraduate studies at Columbia University. His work has appeared in Petits Propos Culinaires, and he has been the recipient of the Sophie Coe Prize for Food History at the 2014 Oxford Symposium on Food and Cookery.


Ben Huf

Ben Huf

Ben Huf is a Junior Research Fellow in the Laureate Research Program in International History. He undertook doctoral studies at the Australian National University. His thesis, titled “Making Things Economic: Theory and Government in New South Wales, 1788-1863”, recounted the invention and uses of the ‘economic’ as a category of knowledge in the context of nineteenth century British imperialism in colonial Australia. With the Laureate, Ben will be pursing two projects framed by a nineteenth century transition from imperialism to internationalism. The first investigates the formation of public debts in British settler colonies to better understand the internationalisation of financial markets. The second probes the conceptual history of the ‘international labour market’ by relating it to pioneering efforts by British pan-imperial authorities to collect and publish migration and wage statistics in the second half of the nineteenth century. This connects to Ben’s broader interests in an international intellectual history of the ‘wage’. Ben has received a number of travel grants and awards and presented or published on labour history, migration history, the history of economic discourse and imperial history.