Postdoctoral Research Fellows

Jamie Martin

Jamie Martin

Dr Jamie Martin holds a PhD in History from Harvard University. He is a historian of modern Europe, international order, and the history of capitalism. His current book project, Experts of the World Economy: European Stabilization and the Transformation of Global Capitalism in the Era of Total War (under advance contract at Harvard University Press) investigates the origins of the earliest international schemes to govern the world's capitalist economy. It traces the emergence of a transnational network of economic experts from across Western and Central Europe, as well as from the United States, whose efforts to develop a new form of international governance transformed European politics and laid the foundation for the kind of international technocratic management of capitalism that exists to this day. His research also looks at the history of international law, empire, and technology, and he frequently writes on topics in European history and political economy for publications such as the London Review of Books, The Nation, n+1, Dissent and others.

Recent Talks
  • “How did Postwar Planners Think of the ‘World Economy?’ The Forgotten Efforts of 1940-1943.” Historicizing the Economy Workshop. Harvard University. September 23 2016
  • "The European Origins of U.S. Postwar Planning: European Integration, Public Works, and Development in the late 1930s.” Center for International Research in the Humanities and Social Sciences. New York University. September 7 2016
  • “When did the Business Cycle Become a Global Problem?” Scales of Economy Workshop. University of Sydney. July 28 2016
  • “The Problem of China’s Development at the League of Nations, 1931-1934.” Sites of International Memory Workshop. Suzhou, China. July 15 2016
  • “Internationalizing Colonial Economic Administration: Debt, Development, and Strategies for Postwar Stabilization at the League of Nations.” Invited Presenter. Empires after World War I. University of Trento. May 20 2016
  • “War, Welfare, and the Utopia of Global Governance in the 1940s.” Invited Presenter. Utopianism: History and Theory. University of Oxford. May 28 2016
  • “The Failed Ambitions of Postwar Economic Planning? Full Employment, Raw Materials, and Development in the 1940s.” Invited Presenter. Religious and Secular Internationalisms Workshop. University of Oxford. May 11 2016
  • “Did the League of Nations Invent Development? The Cases of China and India.” American Historical Association Conference. Atlanta, GA. January 10 2016
  • “International Development before the Cold War: Corporatism and Planning between Europe and Asia in the 1930s.” Cold War Economics: The Theory and Practice of Economic Development in Historical Perspective. London School of Economics. December 15 2015
  • “The Internationalization of Colonial Economic Administration: Strategizing Postwar Stabilization and Financial Reconstruction at the League of Nations, 1920-1923.” Invited Presenter. Disentangling the World: The Politics of Autarky after the First World War. University of Birmingham. December 4 2015

Natasha Wheatley

Natasha Wheatley

Dr Natasha Wheatley holds a PhD in History from Columbia University. She is an historian of both Central European and international history. Her research explores the making and remaking of legal orders in the hundred years between the European revolutions of 1848 and the Second World War, with a particular emphasis on the intellectual history of rights and sovereignty. Her book project reconstructs cultures of sovereignty in late Austria-Hungary and their afterlives in the interwar international order, focusing on the mutual implication of imperial, constitutional and international law. In tracking an imperial jurisprudence on the ‘historical rights’ of the empire’s historic principalities, it shows how legal vocabularies designed to describe the peculiarities of imperial sovereignty came to serve as intellectual tools for managing its absence. Alongside her work on Central Europe, she has pursued a research interest in the League of Nations and its oversight regimes, the minorities and mandates systems. Her article ‘Mandatory Interpretation: Legal Hermeneutics and the New International Order in Arab and Jewish Petitions to the League of Nations,’ published in Past and Present in May 2015, uncovers a hidden history of the League’s rise and fall in the hundreds of petitions sent from Mandate Palestine.

In 2014 she was an Ernst Mach Fellow at the University of Vienna, and her research has been supported by fellowships and prizes from (among others) the Doris G. Quinn Foundation, the Central European History Society, the Dan David Foundation and the New York Consortium for Intellectual and Cultural History. She has taught classes on the history of human rights and twentieth–century Europe, as well as on ‘historical rights’ claims in comparative perspective (Central Europe, Israel/Palestine, and indigenous Australia).

After Empire: The League of Nations and the former Habsburg Lands

Recent Talks
  • "The Multidirectional Traffic in Imperial Legal Analogy between the British and the Austro-Hungarian Empires,” Imperial Comparison, All Souls College, University of Oxford, July 8-9 2016
  • "Spectral Legal Personality in Interwar International Law: On New Ways of Not Being a State", Law and Humanities Interdisciplinary Junior Scholars Workshop, UCLA, June 6-7 2016
  • "The Ghost" (as part of a panel on "Figures in International Law"), Law and Society Association Annual Meeting, New Orleans, June 2-5 2016
  • "Living and Dying in International Law", Law in International Orders - Past and Present, University of Cambridge, May 18-19 2016
  • "Imperial Constitutionalism by Analogy: Looking Sideways between the British and Austro-Hungarian Empires", Liberalism Within and Beyond Empire, Colombo, Sri Lanka, December 18-19 2015
  • "Spectral Legal Personality in Interwar International Law: On New Ways of Not Being a State", Faculty of Law, University of Melbourne, October 6 2015
  • "Deferred Sovereignty in the Age of the Mandate System", The Protection of Indigenous Peoples in European Empires, University of New South Wales, Sydney, September 30 2015

Past Postdoctoral Research Fellows

Philippa Hetherington

Philippa Hetherington

Dr Philippa Hetherington received her PhD in History (with a minor in Studies of Women, Gender and Sexuality) from Harvard University in 2014. She works on the cultural, social and legal history of imperial Russia and the early Soviet Union in transnational perspective, integrating theoretical approaches drawn from the study of gender, sexuality and migration to explore how certain conceptions of gendered and sexualised bodies became central to questions of state security and sovereignty. Her current book project, tentatively entitled Circulating Subjects: The Traffic in Women and the Russian Construction of an International Crime, draws on dissertation research conducted in Moscow, St. Petersburg, Odessa, Geneva and London to examine the emergence of 'trafficking in women' as a specific crime in turn-of-the-century Russia, linking this to the development of international humanitarian law, migratory regimes, and imperial governance. She also works in the fields of comparative legal history, feminist and queer theory, and the cultural and intellectual history of the fin-de-siècle. In addition to her book, Philippa is also currently working on an article examining the regulation of emigration from Eurasia as an important contributor to the early development of international migration law.

Dr Hetherington's research has been funded by grants and fellowships from, among others, the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the Woodrow Wilson Foundation and the Social Science Research Council. Prior to coming to the University of Sydney, she was a fellow at the Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics at Harvard Law School, and an associate of the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs and the Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies. She has taught on the global history of sex work, gender and Islam, and the Russian revolution in international perspective.


Sophie Loy-Wilson

Sophie Loy-Wilson

Dr Sophie Loy-Wilson holds a PhD from the School of Philosophical and Historical Inquiry at the University of Sydney, and has worked as a Lecturer and Faculty Member at Deakin University. Her PhD The Smiling Professions: Salesmanship and Promotional Culture in Australia and China 1929-1939 drew on Chinese language sources and the personal papers of Australian and Chinese travelling salesmen, department store workers, peddlers and businesspeople to trace the ways in which face-to-face commercial interactions helped construct networks of contact and interaction that emerged between Australia and China in the interwar years. This focus on commercial encounters allowed her to explore the relationship between economics and the cultural domain of interwar colonialisms through personal relationships and everyday interactions. Sophie has lived in China intermittently since 1995 and attended Beijing International Studies University between 2002 and 2003. She studied history and Mandarin Chinese language at the University of Sydney (BA, 2005) and gained her honours with a University of Sydney award for Best Australian History Thesis 1900-1940 (2006). She has published journal articles in History Australia, Media History International, Journal of Contemporary History and History Workshop Journal. She has also taught in twentieth century Australian social and cultural history, Australia-Asia relations and Chinese history from the Republican Era through to the present.