Law & Society Research Network Events

SECRECY, LAW AND SOCIETY

A two-day workshop to investigate the legal and socio-legal dimensions of secrecy

Thursday 6 February, 2014 & Friday 7 February, 2014

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About the workshop

Scholars and critics have shown how a ‘culture of security’ ushered in after 11 September 2001 has involved exceptional legal measures and increased recourse to secrecy on the basis of protecting public safety and national security. However, secrecy is not confined to this development, and includes legacies of secrecy across a range of institutional and cultural settings. With this in mind, this two day workshop will interrogate the legal as well as socio-legal dimensions of secrecy.

CLICK HERE for further information about the workshop and how to submit an abstract.

Venue: New Law Building, F10 [map]
Registration Opening at the end of 2013

Public Lecture:

The End of Public Religions in America: Occupy, Tea Party politics, Same-sex marriage, homosexuality, abortion, Shari'a and the growth of no religion

Tuesday 30 July 2013 - 6 - 8 pm (registration and refreshments from 5.30Pm)

Speaker: Bryan S. Turner

About the lecture

American exceptionalism has typically included the notion that secularization might apply to northern Europe but was not a valid description of religion in the United States. Most accounts of religion in America start with Alex de Tocqueville in the 1840s and conclude with Robert Bell on civil religion. Furthermore, in 1994 Jose Casanova published his influential book on Public Religions in the Modern World to argue against a naïve view of secularization, and to draw attention to the Moral Majority, Solidarity, the Iranian Revolution and Latin American liberal theology. In the last decade the sociology of religion has celebrated the presence of religion in the public domain. The secularization thesis is dead and buried – or at least almost.

This lecture looks at what is arguably the failure of the Moral Majority agenda to capture American politics, which is a thesis illustrated by looking at the slow and complex, but significant, acceptance in mainstream politics of homosexuality in the military, in the Body Scouts, and public life. We can also point to the spread of legislation in support of same-sex marriage, and the modest success of creationism. After Obama’s second electoral victory, it appears the Republican party is abandoning the Tea Party and embracing Democratic strategies.

The lecture reports on some research undertaken in New York on Occupy Wall Street, which had only limited religious support. People who declare ‘no religion’ has grown to around 20%; ‘spirituality’ rather than ‘religion’ has also grown. Is America becoming like northern European societies in terms of secularization? Possibly – but this lecture concludes, because it is timely, with a retrospective reflection on Reagan and Thatcher to consider the different location of political conservatism and conservative politics in the two societies.

Click here to download the flyer

http://sydney.edu.au/news/law/457.html?eventcategoryid=35&eventid=10263
About the Speaker: Prof. Brian TurnerProfessor Bryan S. Turner

Bryan S. Turner is the Presidential Professor of Sociology and the Director of the Committee on Religion at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York, and concurrently the Director of the Centre on Religion and Society at the University of Western Sydney. He was the Professor of Sociology at the University of Cambridge (1998-2005) and was awarded a doctor of letters from the University in 2009. More recently the Alona Evans Distinguished Visiting Professor of Sociology at Wellesley College (2009-2010). His publications in the sociology of religion include Weber and Islam (1974), Religion and Social Theory (1983) (with Kamaludeen and Pereira), Muslims in Singapore (2010), Religion and Modern Society (2011), and The Religious and the Political (2013). He is currently editing the Wiley-Blackwell Encyclopedia of Social Theory. His current research projects are on Shari’a in the USA and Australia, Occupy Wall Street, assimilation of Muslims in the West, and the same-sex marriage debate in New Zealand and Australia.

Venue: New Law Building, F10 [map]
Registration Attendance is complimentary, however registration is essential. CLICK HERE or phone 02 9351 0323 law.events@sydney.edu.au

Seminar and Workshop: Global Order and Governance

Monday 25 March 2013 - 10am - 4pm (Lunch 12 - 2pm)

Speaker: Roland Axtmann

This workshop will address the question of how to understand and analyse the emergence of new forms of global governance and authoritative public power. Global governance, it will be suggested, can be conceptualised as an element of the political economy of the reproduction of capitalism. At the heart of this project of global governance, carried out by an ever-expanding global financial and organisational elite, lies the attempt to ‘lock in’ commitments to liberalisation and to ‘lock out’ popular-democratic and parliamentary forces from control over crucial economic, social, and ecological policies.

The workshop will be divided into a morning (10am-12pm) and an afternoon session (2-4pm). In the morning seminar session, Professor Axtmann will outline his thoughts on these themes, followed by comments from Professor Hans Hendrischke (Chinese Studies Centre, Business School, University of Sydney) acting as discussant, as well as audience questions. The afternoon session will consist of a research development workshop where Professor Axtmann will engage with the research interests of participants.

Lunch will be provided, 12-2pm. Venue: RC Mills Building, Room 148, University of Sydney

If you are interested in participating, please RSVP to Greg Martin (greg.martin@sydney.edu.au) ASAP, as places are limited, with a 200-word outline of your current research project and interests.

Click here to download the flyer

About the Speaker: Prof. Roland AxtmannProfessor Roland Axtmann, London School of Economics

After his PhD at the London School of Economics, Roland taught at the University of Aberdeen for 16 years, and from 2005 he has been Professor of Politics & International Relations at the University of Swansea. He held visiting appointments at Heidelberg University (Germany); Karl-Franzens University Graz (Austria); University of California, Los Angeles; Deakin University and the University of Queensland. He has also been a visiting fellow at the Institute for Democracy & Human Rights at The University of Sydney.

Roland has published widely in the areas of democracy, globalization, macro-political change and (international) political theory. His books include Democracy: Problems and Perspectives (Edinburgh University Press, 2007), Authority, State and National Character: The Civilizing Process in Austria and England, 1700 – 1900 (Ashgate, 2007) with H. Kuzmics), Understanding Democratic Politics: Concepts, Institutions, Movements (London: Sage, 2003), and he has published in leading journals such as History of Political Thought; History of the Human Sciences; Review of International Studies; International Political Science Review; International Politics; Theory, Culture & Society; German History; German Politics & Society; and Leviathan.

He is currently working on questions concerning democratic governance and the legitimacy of global public authority structures, focussing on issues such as global constitutionalism, cosmopolitanism, representation and participation in global governance, and transnational democracy.

Venue: Room 148 RC Mills building, A26 [map]

Postgraduate Workshop: Global Order and Governance

Thursday 28 March 2013 - 10am - 12pm (Lunch 1-2pm)

Speaker: Roland Axtmann

Lunch will be provided after the workshop, 12-1pm. Venue: New Law School, Seminar Room 105, University of Sydney

If you are interested in participating, please RSVP to Greg Martin (greg.martin@sydney.edu.au) ASAP, as places are limited, with a 200-word outline of your current research project and interests.

Click here to download the flyer

About the Speaker: Prof. Roland AxtmannProfessor Roland Axtmann, London School of Economics

After his PhD at the London School of Economics, Roland taught at the University of Aberdeen for 16 years, and from 2005 he has been Professor of Politics & International Relations at the University of Swansea. He held visiting appointments at Heidelberg University (Germany); Karl-Franzens University Graz (Austria); University of California, Los Angeles; Deakin University and the University of Queensland. He has also been a visiting fellow at the Institute for Democracy & Human Rights at The University of Sydney.

Roland has published widely in the areas of democracy, globalization, macro-political change and (international) political theory. His books include Democracy: Problems and Perspectives (Edinburgh University Press, 2007), Authority, State and National Character: The Civilizing Process in Austria and England, 1700 – 1900 (Ashgate, 2007) with H. Kuzmics), Understanding Democratic Politics: Concepts, Institutions, Movements (London: Sage, 2003), and he has published in leading journals such as History of Political Thought; History of the Human Sciences; Review of International Studies; International Political Science Review; International Politics; Theory, Culture & Society; German History; German Politics & Society; and Leviathan.

He is currently working on questions concerning democratic governance and the legitimacy of global public authority structures, focussing on issues such as global constitutionalism, cosmopolitanism, representation and participation in global governance, and transnational democracy.

Venue: Seminar Room 105, New Law School [map], University of Sydney