SSSHARC

The goal of the Sydney Social Sciences and Humanities Advanced Research Centre (SSSHARC) is to support and help cultivate internally and externally-funded inter-disciplinary collaborative research. It will provide physical space and support for visitors, research networks and research groups. It will serve as a regular venue for Faculty symposia, workshops and conferences. It will help foster and support collaboration and engagement between researchers across the Faculty and the University, including liaison with public and private sector partners. It will also enable the Faculty to promote its research excellence and expertise to the broader community. Please connect with us on twitter at @SSSHARC.

These websites will be shortly be updated with 2016 initiatives such as Reading Groups and Symposiums.

In September 2015 a short grant scheme was run to seed and support the development of new, high quality collaborative projects by researchers working within and across disciplines in the Faculty. The following projects were awarded:

Regionalising American Studies

Group Coordinators: Thomas Adams and Aaron Nyerges

Researchers: Sarah Gleeson-White, David Smith, Sarah Maer

Their research: This collaboration seeks to redraw the boundaries of the discipline of American Studies by placing the category of “region” in relationship to the increasingly pervasive discourse of the “transnational.” In organising a diverse cohort of scholars around the theme of region, this project grounds global processes in quotidian culture and intervenes in the most important disciplinary debates of the past two decades.

To aid this project, the coordinators have announced a conference of the same name which will be held at the United States Studies Centre on 8th and 9th of August, 2016. This conference will help to bring together the varied and distinct processes within the discipline, practiced throughout the world. They are currently inviting proposals from international scholars from any discipline, to learn more visit their announcement.

Cultures of Modernities in the Global Medieval and Pre-modern World

Group Coordinators: Sahar Amer and Hélène Sirantoine

Researchers: Esther Klein, Peter Anstey, John Gagné, Francesco Borghesi, John Wooding, Jan Shaw, Huw Griffiths

Their research: Emerging out of the research interests of a group of senior, early, and mid-career researchers, this project seeks to expand the traditional focus, common disciplinary constraints, and geographical reach of the Middle Ages and early modern period.

The coordinators are hosting a conference entitled ‘Cultures of Modernities in the Global Medieval and Pre-modern World’ on the 16th-18th June, 2016. Sahar Amer and Hélène Sirantoine will convene the event alongside Macquarie University academics.

Urban Expansion and Densification: Perspectives from the Humanities and Social Sciences

Group Coordinator: Richard Miles

Researchers: Nicholas Eckstein, Roland Fletcher, Tess Lea, Kirsten McKenzie, Robbie Peters, Madeleine Pill, Brigid Rooney, Jelle Stoop and Stephen Whelan

Their research: Urban density has been key to how cities and urban cultures have been represented, imagined, judged and contested for millennia, yet contemporary debates on urban densification and expansion appear to be the preserve urban planners, architects and urban policy specialists. This project aims to provide a temporal and intellectual hinterland for modern urban policy. Our project will create a necessary context to these debates through analysis of a range of historical and contemporary case studies.

Sydney Cyber Security Network

Group Coordinators: Frank Smith and Aim Sinpeng

Researchers: Colin Wight, Robert Van Krieken, Ben Saul, Justin Hastings, Benedetta Brevini, Jonathon Hutchinson, Charlotte Epstein and Simon Reay Atkinson

Their research: The world is increasingly dependent upon cyberspace but security in this domain is poorly understood. We suffer dangerous gaps in our knowledge because cyber security is inherently interdisciplinary. Technical expertise alone is insufficient; it must be coupled with sophisticated analysis of social and political factors if the theory and practice of cyber security are to progress. This project will create the Sydney Cyber Security Network (SCSN), building on resident expertise in politics, media, sociology, law, and technology to create new cross-disciplinary collaboration. SCSN will advance research at the University and build a strong foundation for community engagement.

Social Media & Digital Citizenship

Group Coordinators: Ariadne Vromen, Fiona Martin and Gerard Goggin

Researchers: Aim Sinpeng, Jonathon Hutchinson

Their research: Social media activity is now part of everyday life for most citizens. Yet social media use is skewed towards those with the motives, skills, access and incentives to build and use online networks. This project uses ground-breaking social media infrastructure and methodologies to investigate how these inequities manifest in media, communications, politics and society and how they might be better apprehended and studied. It aims to promote greater recognition of social and cultural diversity in public debate, increased attention to the complex ethics of online communications and deeper understanding of the mechanisms of inclusion and exclusion from digital citizenship.

Professor Colm Harmon
PROFESSOR COLM HARMON - SCHOOL OF ECONOMICS
THE ECONOMICS OF EDUCATION:HOW TO INCREASE THE RETURN
“Education is the great policy ‘superpower’ on a range of fronts, and is rare amongst policy choices in promoting equity for individuals and generating returns for society more generally.”
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Professor Sheila Fitzpatrick
PROFESSOR SHEILA FITZPATRICK - DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY
LIVING HISTORY:MEMOIRS OF THE SOVIET UNION
“It was incredible to go there [Soviet Union] as a postgraduate student in the late 1960s, when access to that society was still very difficult. Then it was a great moment when formerly closed archives opened with the collapse.”
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Associate Professor Liam Semler
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR LIAM SEMLER - DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH
SHAKESPEARE IN SCHOOLS: EXAMINING THE LEARNING GAP
“The thing that preoccupies me is systems of learning in opposition to creativity. What [high school] students think learning is isn’t what we [university academics] think learning is.”
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Dr Minglu Chen
DR MINGLU CHEN - DEPARTMENT OF GOVERNMENT AND INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS
RISE OF THE ‘TIGER GIRLS’: CHINA'S FEMALE ENTREPRENEURS
“Whenever I tell people about the term ‘Tiger Girls’ in China, people just laugh! Female Tiger Girls, or tigresses, refer to a very powerful female character. She’s dominant, bossy, and capable, but it’s not always a positive idea.”
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Dr Minglu Chen
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR MICHELE FORD - DEPARTMENT OF INDONESIAN STUDIES
BUILDING ASIA-LITERACY: FORGING A DIALOGUE WITH SOUTHEAST ASIA
“Asia, especially Southeast Asia, offers an opportunity for Australian graduates to really give something back. They can really put in practice all the values we try to impart to students. The Centre is built on the premise that the same is true for our academics. It’s a way of getting out of the ivory tower and really turning our academic insights into something very real.”
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