Sydney Social Justice Network

The Sydney Social Justice Network (SSJN) is an initiative at the University of Sydney, funded by the Sydney Research Networks Scheme (SYRENS). The SSJN aims to foster new ways of creating knowledge for social change, by fostering a broad community of social justice researchers within and beyond the University. The network will bring together University researchers working on social justice from a variety of disciplinary perspectives and will foster collaboration with a wide range of organisations in civil society, government and business. The SSJN will build on the existing broad experience in the field of social justice of the University of Sydney researchers. It aspires to be a collaborative research hub that poses challenging questions, generates participatory discussions and articulates public concerns about social justice.


Breaking news Applications for our Social Justice Fellowships are now open

We are pleased to announce that applications for our Social Justice Fellowships are now open. If you are interested in our Community Justice Fellowship click here or our Indigenous Justice Fellowship click here. Details about the application process and the form for both are here

Australian Poverty Audit 2016

As election day fast approaches, key members of the Sydney Social Justice Network have written for the latest Australian Poverty Audit (pdf, 684kB) undertaken by Academics Stand Against Poverty (Oceania). The audit analyses what the three major political parties propose to do to address poverty within – and beyond – Australia. Looking behind the jobs-and-growth/save-Medicare rhetoric, the contributors to the audit provide snapshot assessments of policy announcements made by the three major parties’ during the 2016 election campaign. It includes invaluable insights into what is at stake for many Australians, especially in regards to superannuation, temporary migrants, women, asylum seekers, foreign aid, welfare, indigenous issues and affordable housing. Its authors and editors, including the University of Sydney's Ruth Phillips, Archana Voola, Danielle Celermajer and Susan Goodwin say the audit has been published in the hope it will move this discussion about poverty and inequality from the periphery to the center of debates about the future of Australia.