Dr Grant Bollmer

BA (Hons), MA WFU, PhD UNC
Lecturer

A20 - John Woolley Building
The University of Sydney

Telephone 9351 2308

Curriculum vitae Curriculum vitae

Biographical details

Dr Grant Bollmer arrived at the University of Sydney in 2013. Prior to then, he taught at Massey University in New Zealand, Wake Forest University, and the University of North Carolina, both in the United States. His research primarily examines the cultural significance of networks and connectivity, especially as it relates to intersections between technology, economics, citizenship, and the history of science and medicine. His background is in cultural studies, consequentially leading him to question the relationship between the history, politics, and everyday lived experience of technology and power.

Dr Bollmer is currently working on three projects. The first, Connection Management: Social Media and Citizenship in a World Without People, examines the history of the idea of connectivity and how it relates the contemporary relationship between social media, identity, and governmental norms of individual conduct. The second, Medium Theory, is an introduction and reframing of materialist medium theory in terms of the politics of technology. The third, which is only in its infancy, examines the historical and technological production of affective and non-affective bodies.

Research interests

  • The cultural history of social media and the idea of connectivity
  • Technology, embodiment, and affect
  • Technological recording and memory
  • Technology, citizenship, and governmentality
  • The political economy of new media
  • Discourses of the normal and the pathological
  • Cultural studies
  • Materialist medium theory
  • Media archaeology
  • Cultural theory and continental philosophy (especially marxism, poststructuralism, phenomenology, and new materialism)

In the media

Bridget Jones, “Movers & Shakers: Thanks to the Internet Dance Crazes are Bigger than Ever,” Sunday Star-Times Magazine, 31 March 2013

Selected publications

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Journals

  • Bollmer, G. (2014). Pathologies of Affect: The 'New Wounded' and the Politics of Ontology. Cultural Studies, 28(2), 299-326. [More Information]
  • Bollmer, G. (2013). Millions Now Living Will Never Die: Cultural Anxieties About the Afterlife of Information. The Information Society, 29(3), 142-151. [More Information]
  • Bollmer, G. (2013). Review of: McKenzie "Wark's Telesthesia: Communication, Culture & Class". Media International Australia Incorporating Culture and Policy: quarterly journal of media research and resources, 147, 177.
  • Bollmer, G. (2012). Demanding Connectivity: The Performance of 'True' Identity and the Politics of Social Media. JOMEC Journal, Journalism, Media and Cultural Studies, 1.
  • Bollmer, G. (2011). Community as a Financial Network: Mortgages, Citizenship, and Connectivity. Democratic Communique, 24, 39-56.
  • Bollmer, G. (2011). Virtuality in Systems of Memory: Toward an Ontology of Collective Memory, Ritual, and the Technological. Memory Studies, 4(4), 450-464. [More Information]
  • Bollmer, G. (2010). Review Essay: Not Understanding the Network? A Review of Four Contemporary Works. The Communication Review, 13(3), 243-260.

2014

  • Bollmer, G. (2014). Pathologies of Affect: The 'New Wounded' and the Politics of Ontology. Cultural Studies, 28(2), 299-326. [More Information]

2013

  • Bollmer, G. (2013). Millions Now Living Will Never Die: Cultural Anxieties About the Afterlife of Information. The Information Society, 29(3), 142-151. [More Information]
  • Bollmer, G. (2013). Review of: McKenzie "Wark's Telesthesia: Communication, Culture & Class". Media International Australia Incorporating Culture and Policy: quarterly journal of media research and resources, 147, 177.

2012

  • Bollmer, G. (2012). Demanding Connectivity: The Performance of 'True' Identity and the Politics of Social Media. JOMEC Journal, Journalism, Media and Cultural Studies, 1.

2011

  • Bollmer, G. (2011). Community as a Financial Network: Mortgages, Citizenship, and Connectivity. Democratic Communique, 24, 39-56.
  • Bollmer, G. (2011). Virtuality in Systems of Memory: Toward an Ontology of Collective Memory, Ritual, and the Technological. Memory Studies, 4(4), 450-464. [More Information]

2010

  • Bollmer, G. (2010). Review Essay: Not Understanding the Network? A Review of Four Contemporary Works. The Communication Review, 13(3), 243-260.

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