Dr Martin Polkinghorne

PhD (USyd), BA Hons Class 1 (Flinders), BA (Adelaide), BManagement (Uni of SA)
Australian Research Council Postdoctoral Fellow

A18 - Brennan MacCallum Building
The University of Sydney


Biographical details

Martin Polkinghorne completed his PhD in 2008 at the Department of Art History and Film Studies, The University of Sydney with a focus on Angkorian architectural sculpture. Martin has conducted extensive fieldwork in Southeast Asia over the last decade, contributing significantly towards the Greater Angkor Project and has taught and lectured widely on Asian art history. In 2009 he held an Australian Government Endeavour Research Fellowship and coordinated various curatorial projects at the National Museum of Cambodia. Between 2011 - 2013 he heads a collaborative and multi-disciplinary Australian Research Council Discovery project on the medieval sculpture workshops of Angkor.

Research interests

  • Southeast Asian art and archaeology
  • Transmission and transformation of art and ideas across South and Southeast Asia
  • Historiography of early and medieval Asia
  • Art history, archaeology and contemporary critical theory

Teaching and supervision

The Art and Archaeology of Southeast Asia (ARHT2641)

Current projects

The Ateliers of Angkor Project

Australian Research Council Discovery Project (DP110101968). The art of ancient Cambodia is universally recognised for its simplicity of form, harmony of composition, attention to detail and mastery of technical execution. In a tradition that spans over eight centuries the Kings of the Khmer Empire invested great resources in making representations of the gods consistent with its ability to confer political legitimacy and fulfil spiritual necessity. Subsequently, the production methods used were often amongst the most innovative technological accomplishments of the civilisation. Yet the techniques of manufacture and the activities of the teams of artists who created these works are unknown. For the first time in Southeast Asia, an international multi-disciplinary project led by the Angkor Research Program of The University of Sydney will conduct research on Angkorian period ateliers.

Selected grants

2013

  • A 14C chronology of sculpture production sites at Angkor, Cambodia; Polkinghorne M; Australian Institute of Nuclear Science and Engineering (AINSE)/Awards.
  • C14 AMS Analysis; Polkinghorne M; Australian Institute of Nuclear Science and Engineering (AINSE)/Awards.

2011

  • The Ateliers of Angkor; Sculpture Workshops of an Empire (Cambodia, 9th to 13th centuries CE); Polkinghorne M, Douglas J, Pottier C, Hab T, Brown R; Australian Research Council (ARC)/Discovery Projects (DP).

Selected publications

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Book Chapters

  • Caró, F., Polkinghorne, M., Douglas, J. (2014). Stone materials used for lintels and decorative elements of Khmer temples. In Silvia A. Centeno, Nora Kennedy, Marijn Manuels, Deborah Schorsch, Richard E. St (Eds.), Metropolitan Museum Studies in Art, Science, and Technology. United States: Yale University Press.
  • Polkinghorne, M. (2013). Decorative Lintels and Ateliers at Mahendraparvata and Hariharalaya. In Marijke J. Klokke, Veronique Degroot (Eds.), Materializing Southeast Asias Past: Selected Papers from the 12th International Conference of the European Association of Southeast Asian Archaeologists, Volume 2, (pp. 205-217). Singapore: NUS (National University of Singapore) Press.
  • Chandler, T., Polkinghorne, M. (2012). Through the visualisation lens: Temple models and simulated context in a virtual Angkor. In Alexandra Haendel (Eds.), Old Myths and New Approaches: Interpreting Ancient Religious Sites in Southeast Asia, (pp. 168-186). Clayton, Victoria: Monash University Publishing.
  • Polkinghorne, M. (2011). Individuals under the Glaze: Local Transformations of Indianisation in the Decorative Lintels of Angkor. In Pierre-Yves Manguin, A Mani, Geoff Wade (Eds.), Early Interactions between South and Southeast Asia: Reflections on Cross-Cultural Exchange, (pp. 333-346). Pasir Panjang, Singapore: ISEAS Publishing (Institute of Southeast Asian Studies).

Journals

  • Polkinghorne, M., Pottier, C., Fischer, C. (2013). One Buddha can hide another. Journal Asiatique, 301(2), 575-624. [More Information]
  • Polkinghorne, M. (2012). Sculpture Workshops of Angkor: Two Recent Excavations in Cambodia. TAASA Review, 21(3), 7-9.
  • Phalline, O., Polkinghorne, M. (2010). In the Public Domain: A New Display at the National Museum of Cambodia. TAASA Review, 19(2).
  • Polkinghorne, M. (2009). The Artists of Angkor: contemporary and medieval stone workshops in Cambodia. T A A S A Review, 18(4), 10-12.
  • Polkinghorne, M. (2008). Ideals and Architects: Khmer temple pyramids, 7th to 10th centuries. Aséanie, 21(juin), 65-88.
  • Polkinghorne, M. (2008). Khmer decorative lintels and the allocation of artistic labour. Arts Asiatiques, 63, 21-35.
  • Polkinghorne, M. (2007). Artists and Ateliers: Khmer Decorative Lintels of the ninth and tenth centuries. Udaya Journal of Khmer Studies, 8, 219-241.
  • Polkinghorne, M., Fletcher, R. (2003). Bounded space: the continuous galleries at Angkor. T A A S A Review, 12(2), 6-7.

Report

  • Polkinghorne, M. (2008). The art, architecture and aesthetics of Angkor: from devout designs to divine devatas.

2014

  • Caró, F., Polkinghorne, M., Douglas, J. (2014). Stone materials used for lintels and decorative elements of Khmer temples. In Silvia A. Centeno, Nora Kennedy, Marijn Manuels, Deborah Schorsch, Richard E. St (Eds.), Metropolitan Museum Studies in Art, Science, and Technology. United States: Yale University Press.

2013

  • Polkinghorne, M. (2013). Decorative Lintels and Ateliers at Mahendraparvata and Hariharalaya. In Marijke J. Klokke, Veronique Degroot (Eds.), Materializing Southeast Asias Past: Selected Papers from the 12th International Conference of the European Association of Southeast Asian Archaeologists, Volume 2, (pp. 205-217). Singapore: NUS (National University of Singapore) Press.
  • Polkinghorne, M., Pottier, C., Fischer, C. (2013). One Buddha can hide another. Journal Asiatique, 301(2), 575-624. [More Information]

2012

  • Polkinghorne, M. (2012). Sculpture Workshops of Angkor: Two Recent Excavations in Cambodia. TAASA Review, 21(3), 7-9.
  • Chandler, T., Polkinghorne, M. (2012). Through the visualisation lens: Temple models and simulated context in a virtual Angkor. In Alexandra Haendel (Eds.), Old Myths and New Approaches: Interpreting Ancient Religious Sites in Southeast Asia, (pp. 168-186). Clayton, Victoria: Monash University Publishing.

2011

  • Polkinghorne, M. (2011). Individuals under the Glaze: Local Transformations of Indianisation in the Decorative Lintels of Angkor. In Pierre-Yves Manguin, A Mani, Geoff Wade (Eds.), Early Interactions between South and Southeast Asia: Reflections on Cross-Cultural Exchange, (pp. 333-346). Pasir Panjang, Singapore: ISEAS Publishing (Institute of Southeast Asian Studies).

2010

  • Phalline, O., Polkinghorne, M. (2010). In the Public Domain: A New Display at the National Museum of Cambodia. TAASA Review, 19(2).

2009

  • Polkinghorne, M. (2009). The Artists of Angkor: contemporary and medieval stone workshops in Cambodia. T A A S A Review, 18(4), 10-12.

2008

  • Polkinghorne, M. (2008). Ideals and Architects: Khmer temple pyramids, 7th to 10th centuries. Aséanie, 21(juin), 65-88.
  • Polkinghorne, M. (2008). Khmer decorative lintels and the allocation of artistic labour. Arts Asiatiques, 63, 21-35.
  • Polkinghorne, M. (2008). The art, architecture and aesthetics of Angkor: from devout designs to divine devatas.

2007

  • Polkinghorne, M. (2007). Artists and Ateliers: Khmer Decorative Lintels of the ninth and tenth centuries. Udaya Journal of Khmer Studies, 8, 219-241.

2003

  • Polkinghorne, M., Fletcher, R. (2003). Bounded space: the continuous galleries at Angkor. T A A S A Review, 12(2), 6-7.

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