Mr James Tan

BA Hons Sydney MPhil Sydney MA Columbia MPhil Columbia PhD Columbia
Lecturer in Roman History

A14 - The Quadrangle
The University of Sydney

Telephone +61 2 9114 2199

Curriculum vitae Curriculum vitae

Biographical details

James Tan began studying Roman history at high school. As an undergraduate and masters student at the University of Sydney, and then as a PhD student at Columbia University in New York, he has focussed on the history of the Roman Republic. His research primarily examines how elites dominate their societies, how people create and respond to economic change and how we as students and scholars can conceptualize these problems.

Working between the departments of classics, history and sociology, Tan completed a PhD which eventually became the book, Power and Public Finance at Rome (264-49 BCE). During six years at Union College and Hofstra University in the United States, he taught an array of courses on ancient Near Eastern, Egyptian and Mediterranean history.

Research interests

Primarily the political, economic and social history of the Roman Republic.

Current projects

  • “The Conquest of Italy, the Conflict of the Orders and the Long Shadow of Tributum,” article in progress.
  • “Marcus Agrippa and the Invention of Recusatio,” in Morrell, K., J. Osgood, & K. Welch, (eds), The Alternative Age of Augustus. Oxford University Press USA (forthcoming).
  • “The Fiscality of Foreign Relations in the Roman Republic (241-146 BCE),”in Soto, I. & J. Valk (eds), The Mechanics of Extraction: Comparing Principles of Taxation and Tax Compliance in the Ancient World. New York University Press.

Selected publications

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Books

  • Tan, J. (2017). Power and Public Finance at Rome, 264-49 BCE. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Book Chapters

  • Tan, J. (2015). The Roman Republic. In A. Monson & W. Scheidel (Eds.), Fiscal Regimes and The Political Economy of Premodern States, (pp. 208-228). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Tan, J. (2013). P. Clodius and the Boundaries of the Contio. In C. Steel & H. van der Blom (Eds.), Community and Communication: Oratory and Politics in the Roman Republic, (pp. 117-132). Oxford: Oxford University Press. [More Information]

Journals

  • Tan, J. (2016). The Ambitions of Scipio Nasica and the Destruction of the Stone Theatre. Antichthon, 50, 70-79. [More Information]
  • Tan, J. (2013). Booty and the Roman Assembly in 264 B.C. Historia: Zeitschrift fur Alte Geschichte/revue d'histoire ancienne/journal of ancient history/rivista di storia antica, 62(4), 417-419.
  • Tan, J. (2008). Contiones in the Age of Cicero. Classical Antiquity, 27(1), 163-201.

2017

  • Tan, J. (2017). Power and Public Finance at Rome, 264-49 BCE. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

2016

  • Tan, J. (2016). The Ambitions of Scipio Nasica and the Destruction of the Stone Theatre. Antichthon, 50, 70-79. [More Information]

2015

  • Tan, J. (2015). The Roman Republic. In A. Monson & W. Scheidel (Eds.), Fiscal Regimes and The Political Economy of Premodern States, (pp. 208-228). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

2013

  • Tan, J. (2013). Booty and the Roman Assembly in 264 B.C. Historia: Zeitschrift fur Alte Geschichte/revue d'histoire ancienne/journal of ancient history/rivista di storia antica, 62(4), 417-419.
  • Tan, J. (2013). P. Clodius and the Boundaries of the Contio. In C. Steel & H. van der Blom (Eds.), Community and Communication: Oratory and Politics in the Roman Republic, (pp. 117-132). Oxford: Oxford University Press. [More Information]

2008

  • Tan, J. (2008). Contiones in the Age of Cicero. Classical Antiquity, 27(1), 163-201.

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