Dr Miranda Johnson

BA Well MA Auck PhD Chicago
ARC Postdoctoral Research Fellow

A14 - The Quadrangle
The University of Sydney

Telephone +61 2 9351 4933
Fax +61 2 9351 7760

Website > Phonebook Entry
> Race and Ethnicity in the Global South (REGS)

Biographical details

I am an historian of indigenous peoples and settler colonialism in the Anglophone post/colonial world, most specifically in North America and the Pacific. At the University of Sydney, I hold an appointment as a Postdoctoral Research Fellow in the School of Philosophical and Historical Inquiry, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences and in the Centre for Values, Ethics and the Law in Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, as part of Professor Warwick Anderson’s ARC Laureate Fellowship project, “Race and Ethnicity in the Global South”. I have previously taught at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the University of Michigan.

Research interests

  • comparative indigenous history
  • settler colonial history
  • Australian and New Zealand history
  • postcolonial theory and race
  • legal history

Current projects

My work engages questions of race, culture and minority rights in legal, political and social contexts. My first book manuscript, The Land is Our History: Law and Indigeneity in Settler States, 1967-2000,makes an extended comparative and connected historical study of key indigenous land rights cases in Australia, Canada, and New Zealand in the late twentieth century. In so doing, it brings to light an unexpected phenomenon: the construction of a concept of indigeneity that indigenous claimants in remote and urban areas came to claim for themselves and that even non-indigenous settlers came to appreciate as a public good.

My next project examines the co-production of new forms of tribalism and liberalism in key sites in the Pacific in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. It examines how tribal leaders, professionals, politicians and story-tellers, re-imagined tribal social worlds in the context of significant changes in the liberal settler state.

Awards and honours

2008-2011: Postdoctoral fellowship, Society of Fellows, University of Michigan

2009: American Philosophical Society Phillips Grant Fund for Native American Research

2007-2008: University of Chicago William Rainey Harper Dissertation Fellowship

2007: CIC American Indian Studies Graduate Fellowship at the Newberry Library

2006-2007: 3CT Pre-Doctoral Fellow (Chicago Center for Contemporary Theory)

April 2005: CIC American Indian Studies Consortium Graduate Conference 2005 paper prize

2003-2006: Top Achiever/Bright Futures Doctoral Scholarship, Tertiary Education Commission, New Zealand, for overseas study

Conferences

May 2013: Invited speaker, State Library of Victoria, Melbourne, presented “Apologising for the past”

April 2013: History on Monday speaker, University of Sydney, presented “Tribalizing Race in Settler States”

September 2012: Guest lecture, Department of History seminar series, University of Auckland, presented “Re-founding the settler state”

July 2012: Legal Histories of the British Empire, National University of Singapore, presented “Indigenous Rights at the end of Empire”

April 2012: Organized “Law and Indigeneity Workshop”, Institute for Legal Studies, University of Wisconsin-Madison, presented chapter 2 of book manuscript

November 2011: Center for Humanities, Faculty lecture series, University of Wisconsin-Madison, presented “Treaty history as allo-history in contemporary settler states”

June 2011: History and Teleology working group meeting, The Research Project Europe, (housed at University of Helsinki) Athens, Greece, presented “Treaty history as allo-history in settler states”

May 2011: Native American and Indigenous Studies Annual Conference, co-organized panel, presented “Performing apology: Being/saying/feeling/hearing/knowing sorry”

March 2011: Comparative Wests workshop, Stanford University, CA, presented chapter one of book manuscript

October 2010: Western History Association annual meeting, Lake Tahoe, presented “After Hualapai: Native Title and the making of indigeneity in the post-World War II era of decolonization”

July 2010: Department of History, University of Otago, July 21, presented “Property v. Belonging: Indigeneity and the Re-Founding of Settler States”

July 2010: Treaty of Waitangi Resarch Unit winter seminar series, Stout Research Center, Victoria University of Wellington, July 14, presented “The Justice of Historical Practice: Maori History and the Waitangi Tribunal”

March 2010: invited to present at, “After Europe: Postcolonial Knowledge in the Age of Globalization”, University of Chicago, March 12, presented “Non-sovereign histories and indigenous people in the era of decolonization"

January 2010: Co-organized panel, American Historical Association meeting, “Race, Nation, and Indigeneity in the Colonial and Postcolonial Pacific”, January 9, presented "Law’s history in the Colonial and Postcolonial Pacific"

December 2009: Presented lecture, “When the settlers don’t go home: Indigenous Rights and the Re-Founding of Settler Societies”, at the Eisenberg Institute for Historical Studies, University of Michigan, December 10

May 2009: Co-organized panel, Law and Society Association meeting, “Indigenous peoples and the burden of proof: case studies from the Americas and Australasia”, presented “Indigenous authenticity and the problem of history in claims to settler states”

Selected grants

2012

  • Global Sensibilities – The New History of Ideas; Blanshard A, Caine B, Celermajer D, Ferng J, Fitzmaurice A, Gatens M, Harmon C, Johnson M, Milam J, Sluga G, White S; Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences/FASS Collaborative Research Scheme.

Selected publications

Download citations: PDF RTF Endnote

Book Chapters

  • Johnson, M. (2009). The Gove Land Rights Case and the Problem of History in a Decolonising Australia. In Bain Attwood and Tom Griffiths (Eds.), Frontier, race, nation: Henry Reynolds and Australian history, (pp. 305). Melbourne, Australia: Australian Scholarly Publishing.

Journals

  • Johnson, M. (2011). Burdens of Belonging: indigeneity and the re-founding of Aotearoa New Zealand. New Zealand Journal of History, 45(117), 102-112.
  • Johnson, M. (2011). Reconciliation, indigeneity and postcolonial nationhood in settler states. Postcolonial Studies: culture, politics, economy, 14(2), 187-201. [More Information]
  • Johnson, M. (2008). Making History Public: Indigenous Claims to Settler States. Public Culture, 20(1), 97-117. [More Information]
  • Johnson, M. (2005). 'The land of the wrong white crowd': Anti-racist organizations and Pakeha identity politics in the 1970s. New Zealand Journal of History, 39(2), 137-157.
  • Johnson, M. (2005). Honest acts and dangerous supplements: Indigenous oral history and historical practice in settler societies. Postcolonial Studies: culture, politics, economy, 8(3), 261-276. [More Information]
  • Johnson, M. (2000). Chinese Civil Society: A case of failure or scholarly obfuscation? New Zealand Journal of Asian Studies, 2(2), 107-135.

2011

  • Johnson, M. (2011). Burdens of Belonging: indigeneity and the re-founding of Aotearoa New Zealand. New Zealand Journal of History, 45(117), 102-112.
  • Johnson, M. (2011). Reconciliation, indigeneity and postcolonial nationhood in settler states. Postcolonial Studies: culture, politics, economy, 14(2), 187-201. [More Information]

2009

  • Johnson, M. (2009). The Gove Land Rights Case and the Problem of History in a Decolonising Australia. In Bain Attwood and Tom Griffiths (Eds.), Frontier, race, nation: Henry Reynolds and Australian history, (pp. 305). Melbourne, Australia: Australian Scholarly Publishing.

2008

  • Johnson, M. (2008). Making History Public: Indigenous Claims to Settler States. Public Culture, 20(1), 97-117. [More Information]

2005

  • Johnson, M. (2005). 'The land of the wrong white crowd': Anti-racist organizations and Pakeha identity politics in the 1970s. New Zealand Journal of History, 39(2), 137-157.
  • Johnson, M. (2005). Honest acts and dangerous supplements: Indigenous oral history and historical practice in settler societies. Postcolonial Studies: culture, politics, economy, 8(3), 261-276. [More Information]

2000

  • Johnson, M. (2000). Chinese Civil Society: A case of failure or scholarly obfuscation? New Zealand Journal of Asian Studies, 2(2), 107-135.

For support on your academic profile contact Research Support.