Associate Professor Nick Eckstein

BA (Hons) PhD Monash
Cassamarca Associate Professor in Italian History

A18 - Brennan MacCallum Building
The University of Sydney

Telephone +61 2 9351 2155
Fax +61 2 9351 3918

Website Phonebook Entry

Biographical details

Nick Eckstein is Cassamarca Associate Professor of Italian Renaissance History. He is a former Deborah Loeb Brice Fellow in the Harvard University Center for Italian Renaissance Studies at Villa I Tatti, Florence (1998-1999); and was appointed twice to the position of Robert Lehmann Visiting Professor at Villa I Tatti (2003, 2006). Since arriving at Sydney he has held four Australian Research Council grants, and has received four awards for his teaching (the most recent an “Excellence in Teaching” award in 2015).

Research interests

  • Social and cultural history of Late-Medieval, Renaissance and Early-Modern Italy, especially Florence.
  • Neighbourhood and social interaction
  • popular religion and lay devotion
  • daily life
  • urban culture
  • the social context of art.

Teaching and supervision

  • HSTY1034 Early-Modern Europe
  • HSTY2612 High Renaissance
  • HSTY2645 Invisible Cities: Imagining Urban Italy
  • HSTY2647 Renaissance Italy
  • HSTY2660 Violence in Italy
  • HSTY4011 Violence in History

Current research students

Project title Research student
Bodies of Whalebone, Wood, Metal and Cloth: Shaping Femininity in England, 1560-1680 Sarah BENDALL
Protestantism and Civility in Scotland 1550-1672 Alfred JOHNSON

Current projects

The Anatomy And Physiology Of Renaissance Florence: The Dynamics Of Social Change In The Fifteenth Century

This project subjects the greatest source of social, economic and urban data on Renaissance Florence ? the tax censuses called the Catasto ? to serial analysis over the momentous period of the city?s fifteenth-century development. The study incorporates the dynamic of change and also integrates quantitative with ethnographic analysis. This combination aims to produce a history that exposes the structural evolution of central Florence in the sweeping terms of a major statistical analysis, but which also narrates subtle cultural developments and nuances in an ethnographic key.

Associations

  • Team-Leader for key theme, ‘The Social Fabric’, ARC Network for Early European Research

PhD and master's project opportunities

Selected grants

2017

  • City Space and Urban Experience at the End of the Italian Renaissance; Eckstein N; Australian Research Council (ARC)/Discovery Projects (DP).

2008

  • The Anatomy and Physiology of Renaissance Florence: the Dynamics of Social Change in the Fifteenth Century; Eckstein N; Australian Research Council (ARC)/Discovery Projects (DP).

2005

  • Beyond the neighbourhood: the urban histories of sociability and community in renaissance florence, 1400-1500; Eckstein N; Australian Research Council (ARC)/Discovery Projects (DP).

2004

  • Art, religion and civic identity in Renaissance Florence: a new interpretation of the Brancacci Chapel; Eckstein N; DVC Research/Research and Development Scheme: Research and Development (R&D).

2001

  • The religious confraternities of high renaissance Florence; Eckstein N; Australian Research Council (ARC)/Large Research Grants (LRG).

Selected publications

Download citations: PDF RTF Endnote

Books

  • Eckstein, N. (2014). Painted Glories: The Brancacci Chapel in Renaissance Florence. New Haven: Yale University Press.
  • Eckstein, N. (1995). The District of the Green Dragon: Neighbourhood Life and Social Change in Renaissance Florence. Florence: L. S. Olschki.

Edited Books

  • Eckstein, N., Terpstra, N. (2009). Sociability and its discontents: civil society, social capital, and their alternatives in late Medieval and early modern Europe. Turnhout, Belgium: Brepols Publishers.
  • Eckstein, N. (2007). The Brancacci Chapel: Form, Function and Setting. Acts of an International Conference (Florence, Villa I Tatti, 6 June 2003). Florence: L. S. Olschki.

Book Chapters

  • Eckstein, N. (2016). Mapping fear: Plague and perception in Florence and Tuscany. In Nicholas Terpstra and Colin Rose (Eds.), Mapping Space, Sense, and Movement in Florence, (pp. 169-186). Abingdon: Routledge. [More Information]
  • Eckstein, N. (2009). Pittori, amici e vicini: The Formal and Informal Bonds of Community amongst Florentine Artists. In Terpstra, Nicholas; Eckstein, Nicholas (Eds.), Sociability and its discontents: civil society, social capital, and their alternatives in late Medieval and early modern Europe, (pp. 109-128). Turnhout, Belgium: Brepols Publishers.
  • Terpstra, N., Eckstein, N. (2009). Sociability and its Discontents. In Terpstra, Nicholas; Eckstein, Nicholas (Eds.), Sociability and its discontents: civil society, social capital, and their alternatives in late Medieval and early modern Europe, (pp. 1-20). Turnhout, Belgium: Brepols Publishers.
  • Eckstein, N. (2007). The Brancacci Chapel: New Questions, Hypotheses and Interpretations. In Nicholas A. Eckstein (Eds.), The Brancacci Chapel: Form, Function and Setting. Acts of an International Conference (Florence, Villa I Tatti, 6 June 2003), (pp. 1-13). Florence: L. S. Olschki.
  • Eckstein, N. (2007). The Brancacci, the Chapel, and the Mythic History of San Frediano. In Nicholas A. Eckstein (Eds.), The Brancacci Chapel: Form, Function and Setting. Acts of an International Conference (Florence, Villa I Tatti, 6 June 2003), (pp. 15-36). Florence: L. S. Olschki.
  • Eckstein, N. (2006). Neighborhood as Microcosm. In Roger J Crum & John T Paoletti (Eds.), Renaissance Florence: A Social History, (pp. 219-239). New York: Cambridge University Press.
  • Eckstein, N. (2005). "The Religious Confraternities of High Renaissance Florence: Crisis or Continuity? In Zika, C and Kent, B (Eds.), Rituals, Images and Words: the Varieties of Cultural Expression in Late Medieval and Early Modern Europe, (pp. 9-32). Leiden, Netherlands: Brepols Publishers.
  • Eckstein, N. (2003). "Con buona affetione": Confraternities, charity and the poor in early Cinquecento Florence",Eckstein. In Safley (Eds.), The Reformation of Charity: The secular and the religious in early modern poor relief, (pp. 47-62). Boston: Brill.

Journals

  • Eckstein, N. (2016). Florence on foot: An eye-level mapping of the early modern city in time of plague. Renaissance Studies, 30(2), 273-297. [More Information]
  • Eckstein, N. (2011). Three Recent Studies of Italian Society and Religion. Journal of Religious History, 35(4), 614-625. [More Information]
  • Eckstein, N. (2006). Addressing Wealth in Renaissance Florence: Some New Soundings from the Catasto of 1427. Journal of Urban History, 32(5), 711-728.
  • Eckstein, N. (2005). The Widows' Might. Women's Identity and Devotion in the Brancacci Chapel. Oxford Art Journal, 28(1), 99-118. [More Information]
  • Eckstein, N. (2004). Words and Deeds, Stasis and Change: New Directions in Florentine Devotion Around 1500. Journal of Religious History, 28(1), 1-18.

2016

  • Eckstein, N. (2016). Florence on foot: An eye-level mapping of the early modern city in time of plague. Renaissance Studies, 30(2), 273-297. [More Information]
  • Eckstein, N. (2016). Mapping fear: Plague and perception in Florence and Tuscany. In Nicholas Terpstra and Colin Rose (Eds.), Mapping Space, Sense, and Movement in Florence, (pp. 169-186). Abingdon: Routledge. [More Information]

2014

  • Eckstein, N. (2014). Painted Glories: The Brancacci Chapel in Renaissance Florence. New Haven: Yale University Press.

2011

  • Eckstein, N. (2011). Three Recent Studies of Italian Society and Religion. Journal of Religious History, 35(4), 614-625. [More Information]

2009

  • Eckstein, N. (2009). Pittori, amici e vicini: The Formal and Informal Bonds of Community amongst Florentine Artists. In Terpstra, Nicholas; Eckstein, Nicholas (Eds.), Sociability and its discontents: civil society, social capital, and their alternatives in late Medieval and early modern Europe, (pp. 109-128). Turnhout, Belgium: Brepols Publishers.
  • Terpstra, N., Eckstein, N. (2009). Sociability and its Discontents. In Terpstra, Nicholas; Eckstein, Nicholas (Eds.), Sociability and its discontents: civil society, social capital, and their alternatives in late Medieval and early modern Europe, (pp. 1-20). Turnhout, Belgium: Brepols Publishers.
  • Eckstein, N., Terpstra, N. (2009). Sociability and its discontents: civil society, social capital, and their alternatives in late Medieval and early modern Europe. Turnhout, Belgium: Brepols Publishers.

2007

  • Eckstein, N. (2007). The Brancacci Chapel: Form, Function and Setting. Acts of an International Conference (Florence, Villa I Tatti, 6 June 2003). Florence: L. S. Olschki.
  • Eckstein, N. (2007). The Brancacci Chapel: New Questions, Hypotheses and Interpretations. In Nicholas A. Eckstein (Eds.), The Brancacci Chapel: Form, Function and Setting. Acts of an International Conference (Florence, Villa I Tatti, 6 June 2003), (pp. 1-13). Florence: L. S. Olschki.
  • Eckstein, N. (2007). The Brancacci, the Chapel, and the Mythic History of San Frediano. In Nicholas A. Eckstein (Eds.), The Brancacci Chapel: Form, Function and Setting. Acts of an International Conference (Florence, Villa I Tatti, 6 June 2003), (pp. 15-36). Florence: L. S. Olschki.

2006

  • Eckstein, N. (2006). Addressing Wealth in Renaissance Florence: Some New Soundings from the Catasto of 1427. Journal of Urban History, 32(5), 711-728.
  • Eckstein, N. (2006). Neighborhood as Microcosm. In Roger J Crum & John T Paoletti (Eds.), Renaissance Florence: A Social History, (pp. 219-239). New York: Cambridge University Press.

2005

  • Eckstein, N. (2005). "The Religious Confraternities of High Renaissance Florence: Crisis or Continuity? In Zika, C and Kent, B (Eds.), Rituals, Images and Words: the Varieties of Cultural Expression in Late Medieval and Early Modern Europe, (pp. 9-32). Leiden, Netherlands: Brepols Publishers.
  • Eckstein, N. (2005). The Widows' Might. Women's Identity and Devotion in the Brancacci Chapel. Oxford Art Journal, 28(1), 99-118. [More Information]

2004

  • Eckstein, N. (2004). Words and Deeds, Stasis and Change: New Directions in Florentine Devotion Around 1500. Journal of Religious History, 28(1), 1-18.

2003

  • Eckstein, N. (2003). "Con buona affetione": Confraternities, charity and the poor in early Cinquecento Florence",Eckstein. In Safley (Eds.), The Reformation of Charity: The secular and the religious in early modern poor relief, (pp. 47-62). Boston: Brill.

1995

  • Eckstein, N. (1995). The District of the Green Dragon: Neighbourhood Life and Social Change in Renaissance Florence. Florence: L. S. Olschki.

For support on your academic profile contact .