student profile: Miss Sarah Bendall


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Thesis work

Thesis title: Bodies of Whalebone, Wood, Metal and Cloth: Shaping Femininity in England, 1560-1690

Supervisors: Nick ECKSTEIN , Julie Ann SMITH

Thesis abstract:

My dissertation examines the materiality, consumption and discourses generated around stiffened female undergarments – bodies, busks, farthingales and bum rolls - in order to analyse the way that women and their bodies were understood, displayed, regulated and experienced in England from 1560-1690. My research utilises a wide range of sources such as probate records, letters and diaries, to literature, the material objects themselves, and even historical dress reconstruction. In doing so it seeks to explore not only the complexities of early modern material and artisanal culture, but to examine the ways that these garments shaped the female body and thus notions of femininity in England during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries.

Selected publications

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Journals

  • Bendall, S. (2014). To Write a Distick upon it: Busks and the Language of Courtship and Sexual Desire in Sixteenth- and Seventeenth-Century England. Gender and History, 26(2), 199-222. [More Information]

2014

  • Bendall, S. (2014). To Write a Distick upon it: Busks and the Language of Courtship and Sexual Desire in Sixteenth- and Seventeenth-Century England. Gender and History, 26(2), 199-222. [More Information]

Note: This profile is for a student at the University of Sydney. Views presented here are not necessarily those of the University.