Dr Ute Eickelkamp

ARC Future Fellow

H04 - Merewether Building
The University of Sydney

Telephone +61 2 9114 1379

Website Contact details

Biographical details

Before joining the department as Honorary Associate and casual lecturer, Ute Eickelkamp was a Postdoctoral Research Fellow (funded by the Australian Research Council) in the School for Social and Policy Research at Charles Darwin University (2004?2009).

Her earlier fieldwork with Anangu Pitjantjatjara speakers in the Central Australian community Ernabella, begun in 1995, includes projects on the social and aesthetic history of the local women?s art style, cannibalistic imagery, and Anangu representations of kinship. More recently, she has studied Anangu children's social imagination and emotional dynamics through a traditional form of sand storytelling, after therapeutic Sandplay work with Tiwi children in Australia?s north.

She studied anthropology and sociology at Marburg, Berlin and Heidelberg, where she was awarded the PhD degree in 2001. She gained a Graduate Diploma in Infant and Parent Mental Health at Melbourne University in 2008. Ute compiled the bilingual book Don?t Ask for Stories: The Women of Ernabella and Their Art (Aborginal Studies Press, 1999); she co-edited with Gary Robinson, Jacqueline Goodnow and Ilan Katz the book Contexts of Child Development: Culture, Policy and Intervention (CDU Press, 2008), and she edited Growing Up in Central Australia: New Anthropological Studies of Aboriginal Childhood and Adolescence (Berghahn 2011, paperback 2013).

Research interests

Research with Aboriginal people in Central Australia (especially Anangu), with a focus on children, art, Christianity, ideas of nature. My current ethnographic work is oriented towards the question of the relationship between cosmo-ontological rupture and the transformation of subjectivities. Specifically, I am interested in manifestations of historical consciousness (in self accounts of dreams, life histories and work, and in play, art and religion) and in what appears to be an emergent notion of nature. I see both to be connected to the long duree of existential crisis involving high levels of social and psychological stress in the wake of socio-economic marginality, state interventions, high levels of chronic illnesses and premature deaths, and ecological depletion. Based on reflexive conversations with Anangu thinkers over many years, the focus at present is on conversion and deconversion experiences that reflect how some individuals are grappling with the undermining of a way to be. I am beginning to explore these questions with a twist (nature and class) in a Western cultural context: the radically transforming industrial region in Germany's Ruhr Valley. I take much from psychoanalysis and have an ongoing interest in transcultural psychiatry.

Fields of scholarship: social anthropology, history and methods of the social sciences, developmental psychologies, psychoanalysis, phenomenology, philosophical anthropology and philosophy of nature.

Links to Publications

PhD and master's project opportunities

Selected grants

2012

  • Cultural resilience and changing selves in Central Australia: towards an Indigenous ontology; Eickelkamp U; Australian Research Council (ARC)/Future Fellowships (FT).

2011

  • Changing Aesthetics at Ernabella: Life, Knowledge and Experience in the Art of Tjunkaya Tapaya; Eickelkamp U; Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies./Research Grants Program.

Selected publications

Download citations: PDF RTF Endnote

Edited Books

  • Eickelkamp, U., Cowlishaw, G. (2012). Young Lives, Changing Times: Perspectives on Social Reproduction. Sydney: University of Sydney.
  • Eickelkamp, U. (2011). Growing Up in Central Australia: New Anthropological Studies of Aboriginal Childhood and Adolescence. New York: Berghahn Books.
  • Robinson, G., Eickelkamp, U., Goodnow, J., Katz, I. (2008). Contexts of Child Development: Culture, Policy and Intervention. Darwin, Australia: Charles Darwin University Press.

Book Chapters

  • Eickelkamp, U. (2016). From good meat to endangered species: indigenishing nature in Australia's Western desert and in Germany's ruhr district. In Jonathan Paul Marshall, Linda H. Connor (Eds.), Environmental Change and the World's Futures: Ecologies, Ontologies and Mythologies, (pp. 161-177). Sydney: Routledge.
  • Eickelkamp, U. (2016). From Good Meat to Endangered Species: indigenising nature in Australia's Western Desert and in Germany’s Ruhr District. In Jonathan Paul Marshall, Linda H. Connor (Eds.), Environmental Change and the World's Futures: Ecologies, Ontologies and Mythologies, (pp. 161-177). Sydney: Routledge. [More Information]
  • Eickelkamp, U. (2014). Specters of Reality: Mamu in the Eastern Western Desert of Australia. In Yasmine Musharbash, Geir Henning Presterudstuen (Eds.), Monster Anthropology in Australasia and Beyond, (pp. 57-73). New York: Palgrave Macmillan.
  • Eickelkamp, U. (2011). Language is My Second Skin: Speaking and Dreaming between Germany and Central Australia. In Craig San Roque, Amanda Dowd, David Tacey (Eds.), Placing Psyche: Exploring Cultural Complexes in Australia, (pp. 173-194). New Orleans: Spring Journal Books.
  • Eickelkamp, U. (2011). Sand Storytelling - Its Social Meaning in Anangu Children's Lives. In Ute Eickelkamp (Eds.), Growing Up in Central Australia: New Anthropological Studies of Aboriginal Childhood and Adolescence, (pp. 103-130). New York: Berghahn Books.
  • Eickelkamp, U. (2008). 'I don't talk story like that': on the social meaning of children's sand stories at Ernabella. In Jane Simpson, Gillian Wigglesworth (Eds.), Childrens Language and Multilingualism: Indigenous Language Use at Home and School, (pp. 79-99). London: Continuum.
  • Eickelkamp, U. (2008). Play, imagination and early experience: sand storytelling and continuity of being among Anangu Pitjantjatjara girls. In Robinson G, Eickelkamp U, Goodnow J, Katz I (Eds.), Contexts of Child Development: Culture, Policy and Intervention, (pp. 138-152). Darwin, Australia: Charles Darwin University Press.
  • Eickelkamp, U. (2005). We Make Lines, Follow this Direction, Then I Look and go the Other Way: Excerpts from an Ethnography of the Aesthetic Imagination of the Pitjantjatjara. In Heyd, T and Clegg, J (Eds.), Aesthetics and Rock Art, (pp. 143-158). Burlington, USA: Ashgate.

Journals

  • Eickelkamp, U. (2014). Dingo, Monster, Rabbit, "I": Personal and Cultural Meanings in Sand Stories by a Young Girl, Central Australia. American Imago: psychoanalysis and the human sciences, 71(2), 99-129. [More Information]
  • Eickelkamp, U. (2014). Formalizing the Interpersonal in Anthropological Field Research. Clio's Psyche: Understanding the "Why" of Culture, Current Events, History, and Society, 20(4), 412-417.
  • Eickelkamp, U. (2011). Agency and Structure in the Life-World of Aboriginal Children in Central Australia. Children and Youth Services Review, 33, 502-508. [More Information]
  • Eickelkamp, U. (2011). Changing Selves in Remote Australia? Observations on Aboriginal Family Life, Childhood and 'Modernisation'. Anthropological Forum, 21(2), 131-151. [More Information]
  • Eickelkamp, U. (2010). Children and Youth in Aboriginal Australia: An Overview of the Literature. Anthropological Forum, 20(2), 147-166. [More Information]
  • Eickelkamp, U. (2008). (Re)presenting experience: a comparison of Australian Aboriginal children's sand play in two settings. International Journal of Applied Psychoanalytic Studies, 5(1), 23-50. [More Information]

Conferences

  • Eickelkamp, U. (2012). Introduction. Young Lives, Changing Times: Perspectives on Social Reproduction, Sydney: University of Sydney.

Reference Works

  • Eickelkamp, U. (2013). Roheim, Geza. In RJ McGee and RL Warms (Eds.), Theory in social and cultural anthropology: an Encyclopedia. (Vol. 2, pp. 712-714). Los Angeles: Sage Publications.

2016

  • Eickelkamp, U. (2016). From good meat to endangered species: indigenishing nature in Australia's Western desert and in Germany's ruhr district. In Jonathan Paul Marshall, Linda H. Connor (Eds.), Environmental Change and the World's Futures: Ecologies, Ontologies and Mythologies, (pp. 161-177). Sydney: Routledge.
  • Eickelkamp, U. (2016). From Good Meat to Endangered Species: indigenising nature in Australia's Western Desert and in Germany’s Ruhr District. In Jonathan Paul Marshall, Linda H. Connor (Eds.), Environmental Change and the World's Futures: Ecologies, Ontologies and Mythologies, (pp. 161-177). Sydney: Routledge. [More Information]

2014

  • Eickelkamp, U. (2014). Dingo, Monster, Rabbit, "I": Personal and Cultural Meanings in Sand Stories by a Young Girl, Central Australia. American Imago: psychoanalysis and the human sciences, 71(2), 99-129. [More Information]
  • Eickelkamp, U. (2014). Formalizing the Interpersonal in Anthropological Field Research. Clio's Psyche: Understanding the "Why" of Culture, Current Events, History, and Society, 20(4), 412-417.
  • Eickelkamp, U. (2014). Specters of Reality: Mamu in the Eastern Western Desert of Australia. In Yasmine Musharbash, Geir Henning Presterudstuen (Eds.), Monster Anthropology in Australasia and Beyond, (pp. 57-73). New York: Palgrave Macmillan.

2013

  • Eickelkamp, U. (2013). Roheim, Geza. In RJ McGee and RL Warms (Eds.), Theory in social and cultural anthropology: an Encyclopedia. (Vol. 2, pp. 712-714). Los Angeles: Sage Publications.

2012

  • Eickelkamp, U. (2012). Introduction. Young Lives, Changing Times: Perspectives on Social Reproduction, Sydney: University of Sydney.
  • Eickelkamp, U., Cowlishaw, G. (2012). Young Lives, Changing Times: Perspectives on Social Reproduction. Sydney: University of Sydney.

2011

  • Eickelkamp, U. (2011). Agency and Structure in the Life-World of Aboriginal Children in Central Australia. Children and Youth Services Review, 33, 502-508. [More Information]
  • Eickelkamp, U. (2011). Changing Selves in Remote Australia? Observations on Aboriginal Family Life, Childhood and 'Modernisation'. Anthropological Forum, 21(2), 131-151. [More Information]
  • Eickelkamp, U. (2011). Growing Up in Central Australia: New Anthropological Studies of Aboriginal Childhood and Adolescence. New York: Berghahn Books.
  • Eickelkamp, U. (2011). Language is My Second Skin: Speaking and Dreaming between Germany and Central Australia. In Craig San Roque, Amanda Dowd, David Tacey (Eds.), Placing Psyche: Exploring Cultural Complexes in Australia, (pp. 173-194). New Orleans: Spring Journal Books.
  • Eickelkamp, U. (2011). Sand Storytelling - Its Social Meaning in Anangu Children's Lives. In Ute Eickelkamp (Eds.), Growing Up in Central Australia: New Anthropological Studies of Aboriginal Childhood and Adolescence, (pp. 103-130). New York: Berghahn Books.

2010

  • Eickelkamp, U. (2010). Children and Youth in Aboriginal Australia: An Overview of the Literature. Anthropological Forum, 20(2), 147-166. [More Information]

2008

  • Eickelkamp, U. (2008). 'I don't talk story like that': on the social meaning of children's sand stories at Ernabella. In Jane Simpson, Gillian Wigglesworth (Eds.), Childrens Language and Multilingualism: Indigenous Language Use at Home and School, (pp. 79-99). London: Continuum.
  • Eickelkamp, U. (2008). (Re)presenting experience: a comparison of Australian Aboriginal children's sand play in two settings. International Journal of Applied Psychoanalytic Studies, 5(1), 23-50. [More Information]
  • Robinson, G., Eickelkamp, U., Goodnow, J., Katz, I. (2008). Contexts of Child Development: Culture, Policy and Intervention. Darwin, Australia: Charles Darwin University Press.
  • Eickelkamp, U. (2008). Play, imagination and early experience: sand storytelling and continuity of being among Anangu Pitjantjatjara girls. In Robinson G, Eickelkamp U, Goodnow J, Katz I (Eds.), Contexts of Child Development: Culture, Policy and Intervention, (pp. 138-152). Darwin, Australia: Charles Darwin University Press.

2005

  • Eickelkamp, U. (2005). We Make Lines, Follow this Direction, Then I Look and go the Other Way: Excerpts from an Ethnography of the Aesthetic Imagination of the Pitjantjatjara. In Heyd, T and Clegg, J (Eds.), Aesthetics and Rock Art, (pp. 143-158). Burlington, USA: Ashgate.

For support on your academic profile contact .