Our people

Minglu Chen

Minglu Chen

Minglu Chen is a senior lecturer in the Department of Government and International Relations at the University of Sydney. Her research concentrates on social and political change in China, especially the interaction between entrepreneurs and the state. She is the author of Tiger Girls: Women and Enterprises in the People’s Republic of China (Routledge 2011).

Event: The Future of China - 4 May, 11.30am
Twitter: @minglu_chen


John Dickson

John Dickson

Starting out as a professional singer-songwriter, John now works as an author, speaker, historian, senior pastor, and media presenter. He has published 15 books, two of which have become television documentaries, with a third due for release in March 2018. He teaches a course on the Historical Jesus at the University of Sydney and researches the origins of Christianity in the Roman empire. For 2017-18 he is also a Visiting Academic in the Faculty of Classics at Oxford University in the UK.

Event: A Doubter's Guide to Jesus - 3 May, 10am
Twitter: @johnpauldickson


Gorana Grgic

Gorana Grgic

Dr Gorana Grgic is a lecturer at the Department of Government and International Relations, and the United States Studies Centre at the University of Sydney. Her research includes transatlantic relations, US alliances, conflict resolution and democratisation. She is the author of 'Ethnic Conflict in Asymmetric Federations' (Routledge 2017). Gorana has been a political contributor for media outlets and policy institutes including the ABC News, Sky News, Bloomberg, the Guardian, Lowy Institute for International Policy, Australian Institute of International Affairs, European Leadership Network and Stratfor. She was recently selected as one of 50 Emerging Leaders at the inaugural EU-Australia Leadership Forum.

Event: Trump’s New World Order - 4 May, 4.30pm
Twitter: @GoranaGrgic


Pablo Guillen Alvarez

Associate Professor Pablo Guillen Alvarez

Associate Professor Pablo Guillen Alvarez is a behavioural economist studying bounded rationality at the University of Sydney. His work is regularly published in international economics journals, and he is co-author of Aus der Erinnerungksite von Bogdan Bogdanovic.


Hans Hendrischke

Hans Hendrischke

Professor Hans Hendrischke of the University of Sydney Business School leads the Business School’s China Research Network and chairs the Business and Economics Cluster of the China Studies Centre. Educated in Germany, Taiwan and Japan, Hans did his postgraduate research at the Contemporary China Institute at the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London. His team reports with KPMG on Demystifying Chinese Investment in Australia. Hans’ main research interests are the emergence of China’s private enterprise sector and the global expansion of Chinese enterprise activity, in particular their investment in Australia. His teaching focus and PhD supervision is on business institutions from an enterprise perspective and the embeddedness of Chinese entrepreneurship.

Event: The End of China’s Economic Miracle? - 6 May, 10am
Twitter: @HHendrischke


Peter Hobbins

Peter Hobbins

As a historian of science, technology and medicine, Dr Peter Hobbins is drawn to danger, tragedy and failure. In writing about subjects ranging from smallpox to snakebite, and from forgotten scientists to aircraft crashes, he explores how our difficult pasts reveal moments of imagination, discovery and perseverance. Based at the University of Sydney, Peter’s co-authored book, Stories from the Sandstone: Quarantine Inscriptions from Australia's Immigrant Past, won the Community and Regional History Prize at the 2017 NSW Premier's History Awards.

Event: Immersive Histories - 3 May, 11.30am
Twitter: @history2wheeler


Annamarie Jagose

Annamarie Jagose

Annamarie Jagose is the Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences at the University of Sydney. She is internationally known as a scholar in feminist, lesbian/gay and queer studies. She is the author of four scholarly monographs, most recently Orgasmology, a critical consideration of orgasm across the long twentieth century. Annamarie is also an award-winning novelist. Her last novel, Slow Water, was shortlisted for the Miles Franklin Literary Award and won the Deutz Medal for Fiction at the Montana New Zealand Book Awards and the Vance Palmer Prize for Fiction at the Victorian Premier’s Literary Awards.

Event: Eileen Myles: To Dig a Hole in Eternity - 4 May, 6pm
Twitter: @arjagose


Remy Low

Remy Low

Remy Low is a Scholarly Teaching Fellow at the Sydney School of Education and Social Work, University of Sydney. In his teaching and research, Remy draws on cultural theory and historical inquiry to examine contemporary educational contexts and practices, with a particular focus on issues of identity and difference. Prior to his current appointment, Remy was a secondary social science teacher, a lecturer and tutor in gender and cultural studies, and the academic advisor for the Mount Druitt University Hub project for widening participation in higher education.


Mark McKenna

Mark McKenna

Mark McKenna is one of Australia's leading historians. A professor of history at the University of Sydney, his books have won several national awards while his essays and commentary appear regularly in The Monthly, Australian Book Review and The Australian. His most recent book is From the Edge: Australia's Lost Histories.

Event: Immersive Histories - 3 May, 11.30am


Jadey O’Regan

Jadey O’Regan

Dr. Jadey O'Regan is a pop musicologist and lecturer in contemporary music at the Sydney Conservatorium of Music. Her PhD thesis explored the early music of the Beach Boys in the 1960s, and her wider research interests include popular music analysis, history, record production. Her work also strives to make music research accessible to music fans, as seen in her recent collaboration with Laneway Festival publication LNWY. She is also a performing musicians and songwriter, playing in a variety of popular music styles.


Jessica Richards

Jessica Richards

Jessica is a lecturer in the department of Sociology and Social Policy at the University of Sydney. Her research interests focus on the sociology of sport, with a particular emphasis on sport fandom, gender and spatial geography. Her work focuses on fan engagement and behaviour of English Association Football (Everton Football Club) and Rugby League (St. George Illawarra Dragons). Jessica was previously a lecturer in Sport Business Management at Western Sydney University, a visiting scholar at The University of Liverpool, and was the founding post-graduate representative of the sport thematic group for The Australian Sociological Association (TASA).

Event: Good Sports - 3 May, 4.30pm
Twitter: @j_richo1990


David Schlosberg

David Schlosberg

David Schlosberg is Professor of Environmental Politics in the Department of Government and International Relations, Payne-Scott Professor, and co-Director of the Sydney Environment Institute at the University of Sydney. His work focuses on environmental political theory, environmental and climate justice, climate adaptation planning and policy, and contemporary environmental movements. His books include Defining Environmental Justice (Oxford 2009) and Climate Challenged Society (Oxford 2013), and his current book project is on sustainable materialism or environmental movements focused on the practices of everyday life.

Event: Climate Change: A Hastening Catastrophe - 4 May, 11.30am
Twitter: @DSchlosberg


Rebecca Scott Bray

Rebecca Scott Bray

Rebecca Scott Bray is Associate Professor of Criminology and Socio-Legal Studies in the School of Social and Political Sciences, University of Sydney. Between 2012-2016 she was Director of the Sydney Institute of Criminology, Sydney Law School. Her research focuses on issues around death and the dead in law and society, in areas including forensic criminology, and practices such as photography and art. She has particular interests in death investigation, death review and the coronial jurisdiction, and in cultural practices such as death-related art and media.

Event: Drawing the Line: The Ethics of True Crime Writing - 3 May, 11.30am


Clara Sitbon

Clara Sitbon

Clara Sitbon is a Lecturer in the Department of French and Francophone Studies at the University of Sydney. Her research focuses on literary hoaxes, fakes and forgeries in French, Australian and British Literatures. She is currently finishing a book that theorises the notion of literary hoax and redefines the notion of authorship. She also conducts research in Digital Humanities, Crime Fiction and Second Language Acquisition.

Twitter: @claradsitbon


Josh Stenberg

Josh Stenberg

Josh Stenberg is a Lecturer in the Chinese department at the University of Sydney. His research interests include Chinese-language literature and theatre, Southeast Asian Chinese communities, and literary translation in the age of Chinese soft power. He has translated and edited several volumes of contemporary Chinese fiction and poetry, and is also an author of short stories and poetry.


Charlotte Wood

Charlotte Wood

Charlotte Wood is the author of five novels and two books of non-fiction. The Natural Way of Things won the 2016 Stella Prize and Indie Book of the Year, and was joint winner of the Prime Minister's Literary Award for Fiction. Her latest book is a collection of interviews about the creative process, The Writer's Room.

Event: Forest for the Trees: Writers and Publishing in 2018 - 3 May, 10am