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2011 Seminars


12th Jan 2011 - 01:30 pm

Venue: Merewether Building Room 397

Speaker: Anand Swaminathan, Emory University, Atlanta

Title: National Mimicry and Competitive Selection: Explaining Product Strategies in the worldwide Floppy Disk Drive Industry


7th Feb 2011 - 12:00 pm

Venue: Room 6, Darlington Centre

Speaker: Ole-Kristian Hope, University of Toronto, Toronto

Title: Relationship-Specificity, Contract Enforceability, and Income Smoothing: An International Study


25th Feb 2011 - 12:00 pm

Venue: Meeting Room 1, Darlington Centre

Speaker: Jonathan Doh, Villanova School of Business, Pennsylvania

Title: Responsible Leadership and Talent Retention: Insights from India


18th Mar 2011 - 12:00 pm

Venue: Room 5, Storie Dixson Wing

Speaker: Alex Eapen, University of Sydney

Title: FDI Spillover Effects in Incomplete Datasets


1st Apr 2011 - 12:00 pm

Venue: Room 5, Storie Dixson Wing

Speaker: Gracy Yang, University of Sydney

Title: Caution or Causation: How Early Entrant Failures Influence New Entry Decisions



27th May 2011 - 11:00 am

Venue: Conference Room 1, Darlington Centre

Speaker: Anthea Yan Zhang, Rice (Houston, USA)

Title: #1. Executive Turnover in the Stock Option Backdating Wave: The Impact of Social Contexts #2. Improving your chance at AMJ


7th Jun 2011 - 12:00 pm

Venue: Room 11, Darlington Centre

Speaker: Haiyang Li, Rice (Houston, USA)

Title: Does Internationalization Facilitate The Product Innovation Of Emerging Market Firms? Evidence From China


16th Jun 2011 - 12:00 pm

Venue: Room 7, Darlington Centre

Speaker: Susan Mudambi, Temple (Philadelhpia, USA)

Title: International Perspectives on Consumer Online Reviews: An Analysis of Amazon.com in Five Countries


17th Jun 2011 - 02:30 pm

Venue: Room 214/215, H69 - Economics and Business Building

Speaker: Ram Mudambi, Temple (Philadelhpia, USA)

Title: EMNE catch up strategies in the wind turbine industry: Is there a trade-off between production and innovation capabilities?


13th Jul 2011 - 12:00 pm

Venue: Room 11, Darlington Centre

Speaker: Tony Kang, Oklahoma State (Oklahoma, USA)

Title: The Impact of Eliminating the 20-F Reconciliation Requirement for IFRS Filers on Earnings Predictability and Information Uncertainty


26th Jul 2011 - 12:00 pm

Venue: Room 6, Darlington Centre

Speaker: Tony Kang, Oklahoma State (Oklahoma, USA)

Title: Understanding International Differences in the Cost of Equity Capital: the Influence of National Culture


2nd Sep 2011 - 12:00 pm

Venue: Room 11, Darlington Centre

Speaker: Sangeeta Ray, University of Sydney

Title: Disruptive Innovation for Mass Markets in an Emerging Economy


23rd Sep 2011 - 12:00 pm

Venue: Room 6, Darlington Centre

Speaker: Sunil Venaik, University of Queensland

Title: A Critical Examination of Hofstede and GLOBE National Culture Dimensions

Hofstede's pioneering work on national culture dimensions during 1967-1973 (published as a monograph in 1980) was followed by the GLOBE study during 1994-1997 (published in 2004). Despite apparent similarities between the two studies, there are a large number of anomalies that call into question the validity and reliability of national culture scores in these two well-known national culture models. The problems will be demonstrated through critical analysis of the definitions and measurement of national culture dimensions in each model, and the relationship of the national culture scores with external constructs. A way forward is to limit the meaning and scope of the national culture dimensions to the domain and level covered by its measures. More generally, there is a need for greater clarity, precision and congruence across studies in the labelling, definition and measurement of national culture dimensions and the level of analysis in culture research.

Sunil Venaik's teaching and research interests include global business strategy, Asian business, international marketing, market research and culture measurement. Sunil has taught courses in the undergraduate, MBA, doctoral and executive development programs at universities in India, Australia and Singapore. Sunil has wide industry experience including as the CEO of a medium-size enterprise and consulting with multinational firms. Sunil has presented papers at international academic conferences and published in scholarly journals including Journal of International Business Studies, Organization Science, Journal of Business Research, Management International Review, and Economic and Political Weekly.


20th Oct 2011 - 12:00 am

Venue: Darlington Centre - Room 6

Speaker: Tirta Mursitama, University of Indonesia

Title: Chasing Down the Balance: Impact of Potential and Realized Absorptive Capacity on Performance of Indonesian Public-Listed Firms

This research  examines impacts of absorptive capacity  (ACAP) both potential absorptive capacity (PACAP) and realized  absorptive capacity (RACAP) on performance empirically in the  context of emerging economies applying  resource-based view of the firms (RBV). This  research is based on 52 samples of  Indonesian public-listed companies whose market  capitalization is accounted by for 38%  of total market capitalization in Indonesia  stocks market (JSX) in 2006. Drawing from Zahra and George's (2002) framework  that distinguishes potential absorptive capacity  (PACAP) and realized absorptive capacity  (RACAP), results indicate firms with well-developed PACAP sustain  competitive advantage through flexibility in reconfiguring  and deploying their resources whereas firms with  well-developed RACAP may sustain competitive advantage by its innovation and  product development. Finally, firms with balance of high PACAP and high RACAP  outperform firms with other balance between those two dimensions of ACAP.  These findings support that the success  development of Indonesian public-listed companies'  capabilities through external knowledge acquisition,  assimilation, transformation and exploitation is an important source of  competitive advantage.


27th Oct 2011 - 12:00 pm

Venue: Room 6, Darlington Centre

Speaker: Galina Shirokova, St Petersburg State University, Russia

Title: The Influence of Institutional Environment on CEO Succession: Evidence from Russian Companies

This paper presents the results of a study on the factors influencing owner-CEOs' decisions to cede authority over everyday management to hired CEOs in Russian companies. Qualitative and quantitative data are analysed to determine common themes used by entrepreneurs when deciding whether or not to turn over the management of the business to a professional manager. Findings suggest that Russian entrepreneurs may be reluctant to cede control over their businesses due to institutional constraints and lack of economic regulation.


24th Nov 2011 - 11:00 am

Venue: Room 6, Darlington Centre

Speaker: Dr Jing'an Tang, Department of Management, Sacred Heart University

Title: Competition, Legitimation, Agglomeration or Connection: The Paradox of Foreign Entry Timing and Performance

Abstract: While competitive dynamics literatures suggest firms to enter a foreign market as pioneers to gain first mover advantages, agglomeration-based location studies, on the other hand, recommend them to enter a market where a critical mass of their peers is already located, that is, to be late movers in order to benefit from the agglomeration economies. Density dependence theory, however, advises being neither early nor late entrants, but being entrants in-between for survival advantages. To resolve this apparent paradox, we draw upon multiple theories to build a foreign market entry and performance model to integrate these three entry positions. We argue that multiple forces interact with one another during the foreign entry process, resulting in an S-shaped curvilinear relationship between entry order and subsidiary survival and a U-shaped relationship between entry time and profitability. An empirical analysis of a sample of nearly 4,000 Japanese FDI entries in over 40 countries from 1985 to 2003 supports our model.

Bio: Dr. Jing'an Tang is an assistant professor of management at the John F. Welch College of Business, Sacred Heart University(SHU) in Fairfield, Connecticut. He received his Ph.D. in business administration from the Richard Ivey School of Business, University of Western Ontario in London, Canada, MBA from the University of Maryland and B.A. in economics from Renmin University of China in Beijing. He teaches strategic management and international business courses at SHU, where he won the Teaching Excellence award in 2008.

His research is focused on international strategy, foreign peer networks and MNE subsidiary performance and has been presented at the Academy of Management (AOM), Academy of International Business (AIB), Strategic Management Society (SMS), the Administrative Sciences Association of Canada (ASAC) and the World Business Institute. He has won several awards, including the best paper award from the International Management Division at the 2006 AOM meeting and best paper in strategy/IB theory at the 2010 AOM meeting, and an honorable mention award (2nd place) from the international business division at the ASAC meeting in 2004.  His doctoral dissertation was nominated for Berry Richman Best Dissertation Award (Finalist of four worldwide) at 2008 AOM meeting and his paper for the Haynes Best Paper Prize (Promising Scholar under 40) at the 2008 AIB conference in Milan, Italy.