Teaching Matters

Volume 6 Issue 4 2013

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF GOOD (and excellent) TEACHING

This issue we look at the recognition the whole school is getting for our teaching and three recent award-winning educators within it, Janine Coupe, Sue Lord and Karl Kruszelnicki.

See this issue also for: Sam Bizri presents iSpring.

Next issue: ACTIVE LEARNING AND eLEARNING

Please contact the editor if you would like to contribute


RAISING THE BAR ON THE JULIA GILLARD GOOD TEACHING SCALE

Have you looked recently at the My University website? If so and you have compared Sydney University Business School with any ten other Australian University Business Schools, we noticeably top or near top all scales including, i) good teaching scale ii) generic skills scale and iii) overall satisfaction rate.

Comparing Sydney apples with apples, students at the University of Sydney Business School are 10% more satisfied with the teaching they receive than their counterparts at UNSW and 11.6% more satisfied than students at Macquarie. Our generic skills scale of 86.4% ups Macquarie's by 28.9% and median graduate salary of $49,400 is 4.86% higher than UNSW's.

“In light of the competitive Higher Education environment we operate in we can be rightly proud of these results,” said Director of Learning and Teaching in Business, Associate Professor Michele Scoufis. “Weighing up data on the My University site allows us to reflect on our performance so we can keep raising that bar.”


Q AND A WITH JANINE COUPE WINNER OF THE 2012 WAYNE LONERGAN AWARD FOR OUTSTANDING TEACHING (EARLY CAREER)


Janine Coupe is, as her students and colleagues attest, a truly outstanding educator who continues to make an enormous contribution to the teaching of Accounting within the Business School.

Her record for making, in her words, “the dry subject of Accounting fun” is seen in all aspects of her innovative and engaging teaching practice. She shares with us some of her award-winning strategies below:

How does one become an outstanding teacher?

There is no one simple answer. For a start I could not have become one without the tremendous support I have received and continue to receive from my colleagues. Reflective practice is also essential. As in educationalist Brookfield's recommendation to reflect on one's teaching via a “student lens”, I attempt to get inside my students heads and see classrooms and learning from their point of view.

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2012 EXCELLENCE IN TUTORING AWARD - SUE LORD

“A BEAUTIFUL WAY OF TEACHING” (comment of student of) SUE LORD

Sue Lord, lecturer and tutor in the Business Programs Unit, is passionate about teaching. Her depth and breadth of knowledge and experience as an educator, particularly in leveraging inter-cultural sensitivity, are acclaimed by students and colleagues alike.

Sue sees herself as “the doorwoman to lifelong learning” where she, “opens doors for students to walk through to examine their ideas, challenge assumptions and create new personal knowledge.”

Sue's philosophy of teaching was inspired by the active learning methods of renowned educator Paulo Freire. Backed by the fact that we retain 10% of what we hear and 90% of what we say and do Sue feels her tutorials are most successful when the students do most of the talking and she does little.

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FELLOW WINNER OF 2012 EXCELLENCE IN TUTORING AWARD - KARL KRUSZELNICKI

INTERACTIVE AND ADAPTIVE - KARL KRUSZELNICKI

Graduating in 2012 with First Class Honours in Commerce (Liberal Studies) and the University Medal, multi award-winning tutor Karl Kruszelnicki from Business Analytics has had the simultaneous opportunity to observe teaching from the position of tutor and student.

The philosophy governing his innovative teaching for learning strategies is that one size does not fit all. “During university, and on student exchange to China, the times I felt disengaged and bored by subjects were when there was little student interaction and, more importantly, little possibility to change the learning process” said Karl.

As a corollary, his approach to tutoring is to make his tutorials as flexible and interactive as possible to best suit students' needs. “I feel this is especially useful given the difficult nature of econometrics and the heterogeneity of the students.”

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FROM SAM'S DESK

Put a spring into your PowerPoint presentations with iSpring.

This issue I would like to introduce a very easy tool to use to convert your PowerPoint presentation into a flash animation. The benefits of this are :





  • it adds professional finish to PowerPoint by seamlessly automating it
  • converting your PowerPoint presentation to flash animation will allow it to work on computers without PowerPoint installed (just save to USB and go)
  • you do not need programming skills to use it; once installed it becomes an easily accessible plug-in (accessed via a tab) to simply click-on to convert your finished PowerPoint presentation to flash
  • you can run a video from slide to slide, each slide displaying a video clip for a designated time, with seamless voice over if desired
  • it is free

For an example here is a recent converted-to-flash PowerPoint presentation I made for MBA use http://elearning.econ.usyd.edu.au/ispring/

Contact Sam if you need a demo or assistance in using iSpring.


Teaching Matters disseminates information about learning and teaching to the University of Sydney Business School. Your contributions and feedback on matters of learning and teaching are welcome. Please contact the editor Susan Ellicott-Darke.