Glossary

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Abstract
An abstract is a summary of the essential arguments, concepts or content of a journal article, thesis, conference paper or other documents.
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BibliographyA bibliography is a list of all the material you cited when composing your essay. This includes books, articles, reports, websites, CDs... It should be accurate and detailed, with enough information to allow the reader to check your arguments and evidence.
Boolean operatorsBoolean operators are connecting words, which tell the computer which keywords you want your results to include or exclude. The most common Boolean operators are AND, OR and NOT.
Boolean searchingBoolean searching is a specific way of searching in a database or catalogue. You use the Boolean operators (AND, OR and NOT) in conjunction with your keywords to expand or narrow the number of results you obtain.
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Citation styleAlso called Reference style, this is a set of rules for the consistent method of formatting in-text references, footnotes, reference lists and bibliographies. Each department/discipline has its own preferred style, so check with your lecturer for advice on which to use. Some common styles are: APA, Chicago, Harvard and MLA.
Citations
A citation is a reference to a book, article, web page or other published item, with sufficient details to uniquely identify the item from which you have used ideas or obtained a quote.
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Database
A database is a collection of searchable records. In the Library context, it normally refers to bibliographic references that you can search using keywords to find articles on a particular topic. Increasingly, databases include the full text of journal articles.
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Ejournal collectionsAn ejournal collection is a group of full-text journals accessible via the Internet. The full-text can normally only be read on the Web, if the Library has subscribed to the particular journal. Ejournal collections include Expanded Academic Index, JSTOR, Project Muse, Proquest, Sage…
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Index
An index is an alphabetical list of terms or topics in a work, usually found in the back of a book.
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Journal
A journal is a periodical presenting articles on a particular subject. They may include magazines, serials, periodicals, newspapers, bulletins and proceedings. Basically, they are anything that is published regularly in a series of volumes. Articles in journals can range from articles on popular or topical issues through to in-depth scholarly works.
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Off-campus access
You can access many Library electronic resources via the web in your home or office. This service is only available to University of Sydney staff and students. This is called 'off-campus access' and authentication is required. See Modules 3 and 5.
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Peer reviewed Academics are expected to produce articles that are of high scholarly merit. When they submit an article to a scholarly journal, the editor sends their work to other experts in that discipline. Critical comments are provided and the author is given the opportunity to make amendments. This is important as it means their work has been reviewed before being made accessible to the public. This process is also known as refereeing.
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RecordThe details that describe an item in the catalogue. This includes information about the book, publication details, subject headings that describe the contents, as well as details about it's location in the library or availability electronically.
RefereedAcademics are expected to produce articles that are of high scholarly merit. When they submit an article to a scholarly journal, the editor sends their work to other experts in that discipline. Critical comments are provided and the author is given the opportunity to make amendments. This is important as it means their work has been reviewed before being made accessible to the public. This process is also known as peer review.
Reference styleAlso called Citation style, this is a set of rules for the consistent method of formatting in-text references, footnotes, reference lists and bibliographies. Each department/discipline has its own preferred style, so check with your lecturer for advice on which to use. Some common styles are: APA, Chicago, Harvard and MLA.
ReferencesA reference provides details of a book, article, web page or other published item. It has sufficient information to uniquely identify the item from which you have used ideas or obtained a quote, so that the reader can clearly identify it.
Research planA research plan is a structured way of organising the way in which you locate and collate material for your essay or assignment. See Module 3.
ReserveFisher Reserve is a short-loan collection intended to ensure the availability of library items in high demand.
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ScholarlyScholarly refers to the academic standards; the development of expertise, awareness of current scholarship and rigorous accuracy, methodology and creativity.
SourcesSources are the materials from which the writer gathers ideas and information.
WriteSite
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TruncationWildcards and Truncation are used when searching a database or catalogue. They are symbols used to replace characters in search words, so that the computer will find variant endings or spellings of that word. They are also useful for finding the singular and plural forms of words. For example, critic* will find critical, criticism, criticised, criticized, critics.
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WildcardWildcards and Truncation are used when searching a database or catalogue. They are symbols used to replace characters in search words, so that the computer will find variant endings or spellings of that word. They are also useful for finding the singular and plural forms of words. For example, critic* will find critical, criticism, criticised, criticized, critics.