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2012 Brown Bag Series

16th Feb 2012 - 12:00 pm

Speaker:

Ranjit Voola,

Affiliation:

USyd Marketing Staff

Venue:

3rd floor staff lounge (3rd floor of E&B all the way at the back on left)

Title:

Brown Bag: Developing a Research Agenda: Poverty and Marketing

Description:

I am interested in essentially changing my research agenda so that my personal objectives and my academic objectives are insync. There is a great opportunity to conduct a independent study of an intervention in India, where 1000 families were moved from ultra poor. Your suggestions of theoretical frameworks and methodology would be great.

16th Mar 2012 - 12:00 pm

Speaker:

Susan Mudambi; Teresa Davis,

Affiliation:

USyd Marketing

Venue:

3rd floor staff lounge (3rd floor of E&B all the way at the back on left)

Title:

Brown Bag: Consumption Culture and Advertising: Two Cross-Cultural Studies on Beauty

Description:

Two related work-in-progress projects will be discussed.

Teresa Davis will discuss: "Socio-Historical Representations of Beauty in Women's Magazine Advertising in India and Australia." Traditional 'eastern' and 'western' ideals of beauty were distinctly different when the mass circulation magazines in the era of the 1950s and 1960s began. In the post second world war period in Australia and the post independence era in India middle class women began to be targeted as significant consumers of beauty products. Increasingly, there is research which suggests a 'converging' ideal of E/Western beauty or a archetype of a 'global' ideal (Jones 2008). In this proposed study, data from the Australian Women's Weekly (since 1933) and Femina India (since1959) advertisements for beauty products are compared across the decades of the 1960s, 70s,80s,90s and 2000s. A historical slicing sampling approach is used, to examine if this 'convergent ideal of beauty' is indeed the case or if distinct differences exist in the depicted ideals. The changing depictions are analyzed in line with Jones' (2008) idea that American dominance of the beauty industry has homogenized the ideal of beauty, while looking for signs of resistance or assimilation to this hegemonic perspective.

Susan Mudambi will discuss: "Reconciling Global and Local Values of Beauty Through Consumption Choices." Past research has shown that consumers reconcile conflicts in global and local values through product and brand choices (Wilk 1995; Askegaard, Arnould and Kjeldgaard 2005). This study seeks to further develop theory on cross-cultural aspects of consumption. The research context is on beauty products as value-expressive consumer decisions. The consumption choices of East Asian women are examined, both home and abroad, using a sample of Indonesian and Taiwanese women of varied age and socio-economic backgrounds.

9th May 2012 - 12:00 pm

Speaker:

Sarah Hilt, Undergraduate Honours Student,

Affiliation:

Supervisors: Dr Rohan Miller, Dr Michael Allen; USyd Marketing

Venue:

3rd floor staff lounge (3rd floor of E&B all the way at the back on left)

Title:

Brown Bag: Human values and organic food preference: understanding consumption using the value self-confrontation procedure

Description:

We are interested in seeking feedback on proposed research in the area of human values and organic food preference. The research seeks to understand why some consumers prefer organic food by mapping consumers value priorities and comparing this to their organic food consumption behaviour. In an experimental design the independent variable will consisted of Value Self-Confrontation Procedure; a tool that challenges a consumer's ideal conception of themselves in order to alter associated behaviour.

14th Jun 2012 - 12:00 pm

Speaker:

Steven Lu; Ulku Yuksel,

Affiliation:

Discipline of Marketing, Business School, University of Sydney

Venue:

3rd floor staff lounge (3rd floor of E&B all the way at the back on left)

Title:

Brown Bag: The Adoption of Online Distribution Channels and Its Impact on Hotels' Marketing Strategies: A Longitudinal Study

Description:

The popularity of the Internet has created a completely new distribution channel: the online channel, which has influenced firms' marketing strategies in many different industries including the hospitality industry. It has completely changed the way people book their hotel rooms. So far, research has been focusing on leisure travelers, neglecting business travelers. As leisure travelers are usually price sensitive, naturally they go after this new distribution channel, which, as most people expect, might be much cheaper. However, business travelers are price insensitive (but time sensitive), and may still prefer traditional travel agents to book rooms for them. How does this influence hotel's strategies on business traveler segment? Do hotels charge business travelers higher prices to recover some of the discounts they offer to leisure travelers? Or, do business travelers also enjoy the cost saving brought by this new distribution channel? Is price dispersion in each segment wider or narrower? What is the impact on the traditional distribution channels (e.g., telephone and travel agents)? In this study, using the data from a high-end hotel chain in a European country, we investigate how the adoption of an online distribution channel by the hotel chain influences firms' strategies on different segments of consumers and its impact on the traditional distribution channels. During our data period (from 2001 to 2007), the hotel chain adopted the Internet booking system, which became popular very quickly. Our data includes detailed information about price, booking method, customer information and room stayed in the hotel at the daily level, which offers us enough flexibility to figure out the impact of the Internet distribution channel on the hotel's marketing strategies.

6th Sep 2012 - 12:00 pm

Speaker:

Charles Areni,

Affiliation:

Discipline of Marketing, Business School, University of Sydney

Venue:

3rd floor staff lounge (3rd floor of E&B all the way at the back on left)

Title:

Brown Bag

Description:

TBC

11th Oct 2012 - 12:00 pm

Speaker:

Ranjit Voola; Susan Goodwin,

Affiliation:

Discipline of Marketing, Business School, University of Sydney

Venue:

3rd floor staff lounge (3rd floor of E&B all the way at the back on left)

Title:

Brown Bag: Marketing and social justice: a contradiction or a space for collaboration?

Description:

Susan Goodwin is Associate Professor in the Faculty of Education and Social Work. Her research focuses on social policy and social justice, and she is one of the Chief Investigators on the University of Sydney's new Social Justice Initiative, a SYRENs funded research network. In this Brown Bag (lunchtime talk) she will be in conversation with Ranjit Voola, a Marketing academic in the University of Sydney Business School who examines the ambidextrous notion that businesses can simultaneously make profits and alleviate poverty.

They will discuss the possibilities and potential of the social justice paradigm for marketing research broadly and in the specific context of the Base of Pyramid Thesis.  BOP argues that businesses can make profits and alleviate poverty in the context of the 4 billion poor people of the world.  However, this argument raises many issues including: What is the purpose of business? Is this another way of exploiting poor people? Or is it unfair, or unjust, if businesses do not treat people in poverty as consumers? Can marketers be 'fair' in serving this potential segment, especially considering their vulnerability? Is it possible for business and marketers to consider poverty alleviation as well as profit?

We envisage an interactive dialogue.