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High standard of Business School Programs acknowledged by peak professional body

18 Sep 2013

The outstanding quality and unique nature of the combined human resources management and industrial relations programs offered by the University of Sydney Business School has been recognised by the sector's premier professional association.

The Australian Human Resources Institute (AHRI), which represents 20,000 human resource and people management professionals, has now accredited all of the School's undergraduate and postgraduate HR management and industrial relations (HRM&IR) courses.

The latest accreditations apply to the Master of HRM&IR, the Graduate Certificate in HRM&IR and the Graduate Diploma HRM&IR, all delivered by the Business School's Discipline of Work and Organisational Studies.

"These three year AHRI accreditations are a guarantee of quality," said the Business School's Associate Dean (Postgraduate Coursework), Professor John Shields. "They indicate that we deliver the knowledge, skills and related personal qualities expected of a high-performing professional practitioner in the HRM and IR field."

AHRI sets standards through accreditation of HR programs offered by universities across Australia, conducts research into people management practices, and assists governments in the development of policy and legislation that affects people at work.

Describing the accreditation process as "stringent" the Acting Chair of the Discipline of Work and Organisational Studies, Professor Marian Baird, said the AHRI had measured not only what "the courses taught but also what was learnt and enforced".

Professor Baird added that the cutting edge nature of the learning content in the Business School's AHRI-accredited programs was due "in no small part to the practitioner-focussed input provided by the Discipline's Advisory Committee".

The Advisory Board which includes a wide range of business, government and union representatives, is delighted by these accreditations," Professor Baird said. "Like the AHRI, our Board members see a strong link between what we teach and what is required in the professional world."

Professor Baird also said that the unique combination of HR and IR skills offered in the same courses helped secure AHRI recognition.

"AHRI indicated that our program content 'fully represented' professional HR competencies which is the highest possible commendation," said Discipline Postgraduate Coordinator, Dr Angela Knox. "This commendation reflects the high quality of our dedicated staff."

"Our staff possess an exceptional depth and breadth of HR knowledge and experience and are active researchers," Dr Knox said. "Their research helps students to gain an understanding of the most contemporary issues while also providing them with the knowledge and skills necessary to respond effectively to emerging challenges."

Professor Shields noted that graduates from AHRI-accredited programs are "equipped with skills critical to practitioners in the employment relations field".

"They are critical thinkers; they understand change management; they are strong strategic partners; they recognise the importance of human capital to organisational effectiveness and sustainability, they are prepared for lifetime learning, and they are ethically-aware and socially-responsible business professionals", he said.

University of Sydney Business School programs are accredited by a range of leading professional organisations, including CPA Australia, the Institute of Chartered Accountants, and the Australian Computer Society. Other professional body accreditations are also in train.