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The University of Sydney Business School offers nation's leading Executive MBA program - AFR BOSS rankings

13 Sep 2013

The University of Sydney Business School Global Executive MBA has been ranked as the nation's leading Executive MBA program by the Australian Financial Review's BOSS Magazine.

BOSS, which has decided this year to rank EMBAs as well as MBAs, says it gave the top spot to the University of Sydney Business School program because it provided an "in-depth experience" to its student cohort.

Welcoming the number one ranking, the Business School's Co-Dean, Professor David Grant, said that it clearly established the School as one of Australia's "leading centres of management learning".

Co-Dean, Professor Tyrone Carlin said that the BOSS ranking validated "a well defined strategy" to join the world's leading Business Schools.

"Our strategy is focused on high quality infrastructure, a high quality curriculum underpinned by experiential learning and a high quality cohort of students admitted to our courses," Professor Carlin said. "We can take considerable pride in this ranking which provides independent validation of our strategy."

Describing the EMBA as "revolutionary", the Business School's Associate Dean (Management Education), Professor Richard Hall said the aim had been to develop a program that was "genuinely global, thoroughly experiential and one that was profoundly personal in its impact".

"We are delighted that this vision has become a reality and resonates so strongly with participants and with business," Professor Hall said.

EMBA programs are typically designed for a more experienced student cohort drawn from managers normally more senior than those who join MBA programs.

The University of Sydney Business School's 18 month Global Executive MBA consists of five, two week modules two of which are undertaken in Australia. The others are delivered in California's Silicon Valley, in the Indian city of Bangalore and in London and the south of France.

"All of these modules involve a combination of intensive classes and real business consulting projects," said Professor Hall. This result is a testimony to the hard work and commitment of our very talented students."

"We know that this program makes a massive difference to the personal and professional development of our students," said Professor Hall. "We know that they graduate with new skills, greater confidence and a capacity to deliver outstanding results on the global stage."

"We also know that they come out of the Global Executive MBA with a broader view and a deeper appreciation of the social as well as the economic purpose of business," he added. "Our graduates have gone on to take up leadership roles at the very pinnacle of their professions and businesses."

"Leadership sits at the very heart of our Global Executive MBA program and is absolutely integral to our mission to improve Australia's business leadership and our strategy for doing so," said Professor Grant. "Our program creates a learning environment in which the executives can build on the already exceptional leadership qualities that they display and it is a pleasure to work with them as they do so."

"The effect of the program is such that it often impacts in profoundly positive ways on the way our students' think about and lead their business organisations and for this reason, after they have completed their studies they remain passionate about the School and its mission," he said. "As alumni, they are invariably highly engaged in its teaching, research and other activities."

Professor Carlin concluded by saying that while the Global Executive MBA sits at the apex of the curriculum, it has had a profound impact on the entire Business School. "What we have learnt, particularly through our focus on experiential learning and our engagement with business has brought enormous benefits to all of our programs," he said.

The AFR BOSS ranking process took ten months and involved over 1700 student responses across a number of criteria. It also included an assessment of faculty academic credentials, business experience and research output.