Workshop and Symposia

2012

  • The NSW Labor Government's record in transport policy (1999-2011)
    27th Mar 2012 Room 214/215, Economics & Business Building (H69)

    The first talk for 2012 in the BLHG seminar series will be held on Tuesday 27 March from 1pm to 2pm in Room 214/215 in the School of Business Building (H69), The University of Sydney.

    The topic will be 'The NSW Labor Government's record in transport policy (1999-2011)' by Claudine Moutou and Corinne Mulley from the Institute of Transport and Logistics Studies, The University of Sydney, Business School. The implementation of special transport for the Sydney Olympics (2000) is used as a yardstick for evaluating transport policy in the Labor governments from Carr to Keneally. In contrast to the optimism and confidence inspired by Olympic success, by 2011 strong community dissatisfaction was evident. The presentation traces developments through the period with a focus on the development of strategies and policies for different transport modes.The presentation is based on the Transport Chapter of 'From Carr To Keneally', published by Allen and Unwin and to be launched at Parliament House, Sydney, on the day previous to the seminar.

    Claudine Moutou

    Claudine Moutou is a transport sociologist and PhD student at the Institute of Transport and Logistics Studies (ITLS). Her PhD research focuses on the phenomena of business opposition to sustainable transport projects in town centres from a goal adaptation perspective. Specifically, how do local business owners and managers adapt their expectations and behaviour about the accessibility of local urban centres when car parking is displaced.

    Claudine's interest in transport and mobility research includes both historical and contemporary perspectives.

    Corinne Mulley

    Professor Corinne Mulley is the founding Chair in Public Transport at the Institute of Transport and Logistics Studies. As a transport economist she has researched and published at the interface of transport policy and economics, in particular on issues relating to public transport. She led a high profile European and UK consortia undertaking benchmarking in urban public transport and has provided both practical and strategic advice to local and national governments throughout Europe on benchmarking, rural transport issues including flexible transport, and public transport management. Since coming to Sydney, Corinne has been involved with State government on the development of transport plans and other studies, the independent regulators, local government, community transport organisations and community groups.

    Corinne has an enduring interest in transport history and is a recognised expert on the recent history of buses in the UK and is a co-Editor for a 'Companion to Road Passenger Transport History' - a resource document for transport historians and a sister volume to the 'Companion on Freight' published by the UK Science Museum. She is on the Editorial Board of the Journal of Transport History.

    A light lunch will be provided.

    For catering purposes, please contact Anna White by noon Friday 23 March.




  • The Role of the Worker Co-operative in today's Globalised Economy
    24th Apr 2012 Room 397, H04 - Merewether Building

    The next talk for 2012 in the CRG seminar series will be held on Tuesday 24 April from 12 noon to 1pm at Room 397 in the Merewether Building, Butlin Ave., The University of Sydney.

    The topic will be 'The Role of the Worker Co-operative in today's Globalised Economy' by Anthony Jensen. The paper will be based on Anthony's Phd. thesis, which has just been passed. In the thesis Anthony explored the theoretical and practical issues explaining the emergence and behaviour of the Labour Managed Firm in the USA, Italy and Spain. He developed an explanatory model going beyond that of the economists and adding richer perspectives from am IR and HR perspective. The research compared the worker cooperative in Italy with other types of labour managed firms in the USA and Spain.




  • Unionism and Employee Participation: The Interwar Experience in Australia, Canada, Germany, the US and UK 1914-1939
    8th Jun 2012 Chambers Archive/Library, Institute of Transport and Logistics Studies

    The second talk for 2012 in the BLHG seminar series will be held on Friday 8 June from 12 noon to 1pm  in the Chambers Archive/Library, at the the rear of the Institute of Transport and Logistics Studies at Burren Street, The University of Sydney (near Macdonaldtown station).

    The topic will be 'Unionism and Employee Participation: The Interwar Experience in Australia, Canada, Germany, the US and UK 1914-1939' and be presented by Greg Patmore from Work and Organisational Studies. The paper is part of an ARC Discovery Project and explores the concepts of employee representation plans (US), union management co-operation (UK), Whitley works committees (UK) and works councils (Germany) and their impact on unionism in Australia, Canada, Germany, the US and the UK. An interim finding from ongoing research by the author into these forms of employee involvement and participation for this period is that despite US labour movement fears that separate forms of non-union representation would lead to parallel organisations of workers that would undermine unions, the UK and German experience suggest that works councils and works committees may assist and even enhance union organisation particularly where management recognises unions for the purposes of collective bargaining. However, where unions are not strong and lack management recognition, there are legitimate concerns that non-union forms of employee representation could be used as an anti-union device. The Roosevelt administration banned Employee Representation Plans as part of its New Deal labour reforms for interfering with labour organisation, while the National Socialists in Germany outlawed works councils for enhancing labour organisation and providing a potential source of resistance to their rule.

    The seminar will be followed at 1pm by the Annual General Meeting of the Academic Association of Historians in Australian and New Zealand Business Schools, which should conclude by 2pm.

    A light lunch will be provided.

    For catering purposes, please contact Anna White by noon Wednesday 6 June.




  • The Banksters of the 1920s and 1930s. Did they 'advise and assist', or did they manipulate?
    31st Aug 2012 Room 397, H04 - Merewether Building

    The third talk for 2012 in the BLHG seminar series will be held on Friday 31 August from 1pm to 2pm in Merewether Room 397.

    The topic will be ''The Banksters of the 1920s and 1930s. Did they 'advise and assist', or did they manipulate?' and will be presented by Elisabeth Kirkby, PHD student from Work and Organisational Studies.

    During the final revision of her PhD thesis based on the Impact of the Great Depression in Australia, Elisabeth Kirkby found evidence to show that during the 1920s, Sir Montagu Norman of the Bank of England, Benjamin Strong, Governor of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, and Dr. Hjalmar Schacht of the Reichsbank held frequent conferences to influence world trade, interest rates and determine the world economy. As disciples of fiscal purity, they believed that they would achieve their aim if central banks were free of all political control, and traded exclusively with each other. They also insisted on a return to the Gold Standard, which occurred in Britain in 1925. This unwise decision affected Australia as well as the European countries, and the manipulation of interest rates which followed was to fuel the Wall Street Crash of 1929, leading to the devils decade marked by escalating levels of unemployment in Britain, the United States, Europe, as well as in Australia.

    A light lunch will be provided.

    For catering purposes, please contact wos.admin@sydney.edu.au by noon Wednesday 29 August.




  • Advertising contrasts?
    19th Oct 2012 Room 214/215, H69 - Economics and Business Building

    The fourth talk for 2012 in the BLHG seminar series will be held on Friday 19 October from 1pm to 2pm in Room 214/215, the Economics and Business Building H69.

    The topic will be ''Advertising contrasts? Conflicting loyalties of class, nation and empire in relations between the Australian Labor and British Labour Parties, as reflected in the careers of John Christian Watson and Ramsay MacDonald, 1901-1931" and will be presented by Dr. Mark Hearn from the Department of History at Macquarie University and Professor John Shepherd from the University of Huddersfield.

    A light lunch will be provided.

    For catering purposes, please contact wosadmin@econ.usyd.edu.au by noon Wednesday 17 October.




  • The Petersham Model for Co-operatives and Housing
    14th Dec 2012 Darlington Centre School Building Meeting Room 7

    The topic of the seminar will be "The Petersham Model for Co-operatives and Housing" by Peter Gates (The Mercury Centre) In this seminar, Peter will look at the nature of co-operative involvement in housing. He will present an alternate approach to the use of co-operatives in the provision of housing in Australia, outlining a model for shared equity housing using a co-operative structure where ownership of the residences is by the co-operative, along with some research questions that it raises.

    Peter is a co-operative practitioner who has been involved for over 25 years in co-operative development. As CEO of The Mercury Centre, he works with groups building collaborative enterprises, people working together for a common goal, assisting them in areas such as concept development; enterprise definition and creation; strategic and business planning; goal setting and situational analysis; governance reviews and renewal; and constitution/rules development.




  • Launch of Gary Lewis's new book
    14th Dec 2012 Darlington Centre School Building Meeting Room 7

    Launch (in co-operation with the Business and Labour History Group) on the Co-operative Research Group's website of Gary Lewis's new book entitled 'Land Water and Co-operation in the Australian Rice Industry to the 1990s'.

    Gary Lewis is Australia's leading co-operative historian with 5 major books examining the history of the Australian Co-operative Movement.

    Gary Lewis has made a significant contribution to an understanding of Australia's co-operative movement. Gary has been writing and speaking about co-operation and co-operatives since 1983 when he gave a paper on the NSW Co-operatives Act at the ANU's Centre for Continuing Education's Working Together conference. Since then, he has contributed over 45 books, reports, articles and conference presentations including books on the history of Australian farmers' co-operatives and credit unions. His PhD. from the ANU focused on history of Rochdale consumer co-operatives in NSW and was subsequently published as a book.

    For catering purposes, please contact wosadmin@econ.usyd.edu.au by noon Tuesday 11 December as to whether you are attending this event.