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Christina Anthony

Christina Anthony

BEc(Hons) USYD, PhD USYD
Lecturer

Rm 504
H69 - Economics and Business Building
The University of Sydney
NSW 2006 Australia

Telephone +61 2 9036 6420
Fax +61 2 9351 6732
christina.anthony@sydney.edu.au

Bio

Dr. Christina Anthony is currently a Lecturer in the Discipline of Marketing at The University of Sydney Business School. Christina recently completed a postdoctoral research fellowship as part of an ARC Discovery project investigating the role of counterfactual thinking in gambling behavior. Her doctorate was completed under the supervision of Professor Elizabeth Cowley, where she examined consumer lying behavior. Christina also has a Bachelor of Economics with First Class Honours and the University Medal from the University of Sydney.

Christina's research uses experimental design to examine the influence of emotion in consumer judgment and decision-making processes. She has a particular interest in how and when consumers engage in affect regulation and coping behavior. She is also interested in the experience of moral emotions and cognitions, including the social consequences of guilt, shame and empathy. Her other primary area of interest focuses on interpersonal deception and the consequences of lying on consumers evaluations and memory. She also investigates mental simulation and how individuals use counterfactual thinking - thoughts of 'what could have been' - in order to motivate and prepare themselves for future goal pursuit.

Other Roles: Discipline of Marketing Subject Pool Coordinator

Newsroom articles

  • Why customers get satisfaction out of deceiving retailers 19 Sep 2012

    NBC News

    Business School professors Christina Anthony and Elizabeth Cowley found that consumers who tell lies over the course of a customer-service encounter experience higher satisfaction if they get what they want than people who obtain a favorable outcome by telling the truth.

  • Why customers get satisfaction out of deceiving retailers 17 Sep 2012

    NBC News - Bottom Line

    NBC News reports that Christina Anthony and Elizabeth Cowley have found that consumers who tell lies over the course of a customer-service encounter experience higher satisfaction if they get what they want than people who obtain a favorable outcome by telling the truth.

  • Lying can bring more satisfaction 20 Apr 2012

    ABC Radio Perth

    ABC Radio Perth has interviewed Dr Christina Anthony, discipline of Marketing at the University of Sydney Business School, regarding her research into people finding satisfaction in lying. Dr Anthony says research has looked into the frequency of lying, revealing that on average people tell one to two lies a day and that consumers often lie to get a refund on insurance claims.

  • Week in Ideas: The Business of Lying 13 Apr 2012

    Wall Street Journal

    The Wall Street Journal has reported on the research conducted by Dr Christina Anthony and Professor Elizabeth Cowley, Discipline of Marketing at the University of Sydney Business School, which suggests that consumers feel more satisfied if they lie and get what they want than if they tell the truth.

  • How Dishonesty Can Be Good for Consumers 03 Apr 2012

    The Atlantic

    The Atlantic has reported on the results of research conducted by Dr Christina Anthony and Professor Elizabeth Cowley, Discipline of Marketing at the University of Sydney Business School, which suggests that consumers feel more satisfied if they lie and get what they want than if they tell the truth.

See all Newsroom items for Christina Anthony

Research Grants

2008-2010

Reducing irresponsible gambling: Changing a justification to an avoidance strategy

The results will aid policy makers in their assessment of harm minimisation strategies such as voluntary self exclusion. Discovering when 'flawed' thinking about previous gambling episodes can be used to justify potentially irresponsible gambling decisions will assist in the design of new prevention measures for irresponsible gamblers and those at risk. The strategies developed here will be useful for gamblers to empower themselves and avoid behaviour they will regret later. Australia will benefit from insights into how and why irresponsible episodes occur and how to prevent them.

ARC Discovery Project

See all Business School Grants

Research Expertise

  • Consumer Psychology
  • Emotions and Affect
  • Interpersonal Deception
  • Counterfactual Thinking and Mental Simulation
  • Motivation
  • Emotional Regulation
  • Experimental Design

Recent Units Taught