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Tim Mahlberg

Tim Mahlberg

BPsych(Hons) Flin; MPsych(Org) Adel
PhD Candidate

Rm 4187
H70 - Abercrombie Building
The University of Sydney
NSW 2006 Australia


Bio

Tim Mahlberg is the recipient of the Deloitte Australia and University of Sydney Business School Partnered PhD Research Scholarship 2015 to explore the future of work and the role of technology in helping people to lead more fulfilling and purposeful working lives. 

Tim has a unique background which combines a natural curiosity about people, a passion for community work, and a dedication to creating meaningful work experiences. With a colourful career spanning corporate, non-profit/charitable organisations, consulting and customer service, he has also worked for over a decade as an organisational psychologist, helping people to realise their potential through their work life. He also founded Australia’s largest coworking business community in Melbourne, which has over 2500 members, many of whom are entrepreneurs and small business owners.

Described by others as "a force for innovation", "one of the world's super connectors", and "a brilliant mentor", Tim is regularly sought after as a source of inspiration in a range of areas including entrepreneurship and social enterprise, community and business innovation, sustainability, career development and leadership.

Tim holds First Class Honours in Psychology, a Masters in Organisational Psychology, and is an active member of the Business School’s Digital Disruption Research Group.

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Thesis working title

Alter-identity performance via social technologies in professional service contexts

My research proposes and explores a new work phenomenon at the intersection of meaningful work and technology; the creation of alternative professional identities. These appear to be enabled through the use of various social technologies. I'll be exploring the lived experience of how employees create and maintain their alter-identity, and how they navigate the relationship with their formal work role and organisational expectations. This research has a specific focus on knowledge workers within professional services environments.

Supervisor: Kai Riemer