2014 Seminars


18th Mar 2014 - 12:00 pm

Venue: Room 214/215, Economics and Business Building (H69)

Speaker: Dr Maurizio Atzeni, CEIL/CONICET Buenos Aires

Title: Globalization, the conceptual boundaries of labour and workers' collective action


19th Mar 2014 - 01:00 pm

Venue: CBD Campus - Stockland Building Lvl 17,133 Castlereagh Street

Speaker: Russell Lansbury, The University of Sydney Business School

Title: Workplace Relation Education Series Lecture

The Workplace Relations Education Series has been established following the success of the 2013 lecture series. In 2014, the program has been expanded to encompass three aspects: an invited paper series, a lecture series, and mock unfair dismissal hearings. The lectures and mock hearings will take place in capital cities around Australia.

The first lecture for 2014 will be a collaboration between the Fair Work Commission and the University of Sydney.

Management-Employee Communications

Effective management-employee communications has long been viewed as a key ingredient in positive employment relations, yet they remain an elusive goal for many organisations.

This presentation will examine how employee communications and engagement can be better integrated with enterprise bargaining and employment relations to achieve productive outcomes for organisations and the broader economy.

Bio: Russell Lansbury is Emeritus Professor in Work and Organisational Studies in the University of Sydney Business School. He holds a PhD from the London School of Economics. Professor Lansbury has been a Senior Fulbright Fellow at the Sloan School of Management at MIT, and a consultant to the ILO and OECD. His current research focuses on the effects of management strategies on employment relations and labour practices in multinational enterprises.

Venue

The University of Sydney
  CBD Campus - Stockland Building
  Lvl 17,133 Castlereagh Street

RSVP

Wednesday 12 March 2014 via
    The University of Sydney Business School website


25th Mar 2014 - 12:00 pm

Venue: Room 214/215, Economics and Business Building (H69)

Speaker: Professor Bradon Ellem, University of Sydney

Title: From 'varieties' to 'variegated capitalism': understanding mining in northern Sweden and the Pilbara


29th Apr 2014 - 12:00 pm

Venue: Room 214/215, Economics and Business Building (H69)

Speaker: Dr Antonina Gentile, Università degli Studi di Milano

Title: How the construction of US hegemony in the 1940s skews intra-European docker solidarity today


13th May 2014 - 12:00 pm

Venue: Room 214/215, Economics and Business Building (H69)

Speaker: Steffi Siegert, Stockholm University

Title: The influence of the use of social technologies on boundaries between work and private life in the context of NGOs


27th May 2014 - 12:00 pm

Venue: Room 214/215, Economics and Business Building (H69)

Speaker: Professor Donna Baines, McMaster University

Title: Resistance as Emotional Labour: The Australian and Canadian Nonprofit Social Services


12th Aug 2014 - 12:00 pm

Venue: Room 214/215, Economics and Business Building (H69)

Speaker: Professor Joel Cutcher-Gershenfeld, University of Illinois

Title: Transforming the science enterprise: Institutional challenges in the "open" era


29th Aug 2014 - 12:00 pm

Venue: Room 298, H04 - Merewether Building

Speaker: Professor Michael Quinlan, Australian School of Business, the University of New South Wales

Title: The struggle for health and safety: Seafarers in Britain and Australia 1790-1900

The BLHG will be holding its next talk on Friday 29 August 2014 in Merewether Seminar Room 298 from 12 noon to 1pm in the Merewether Building (HO4). Professor Michael Quinlan from the Australian School of Business, the University of New South Wales speak on "The struggle for health and safety: Seafarers in Britain and Australia 1790-1900."

If you are interested in attending please contact Andre Pinto at wos.admin@sydney.edu.au by noon on Wednesday 27 August as refreshments will be served.

Abstract: For well over a century prior to 1900 a struggle had been waged to improve health and safety amongst merchant seafarers. Broadly speaking this struggle took three forms. First and best recorded there were a series of pushes to improve the laws protecting the health and safety of ships and seafarers - a struggle for which Samuel Plimsoll has become synonymous though his involvement in no way captures the entirety of the struggle. Second, from the 1870s emerging unions of seafarers sought to improve health and safety on ships including agitating for improved laws and both collective and individual actions to protect members (such as paying their court costs). Third and least known, long before the emergence of and consolidation of unions, seafarers had take a considerable degree of informal industrial action (including strikes and mass desertion) over health and safety on their ship. This action continued even after unions became established. There were over 1800 instances of collective action by seafarers in Australian waters alone between 1790 and 1900 and health and safety was by far the single biggest issue/cause of these actions. Further, the actions covered a wide array of health and safety issues (from unseaworthy ships and incompetent officers to poor food and unsanitary conditions) including pursuing some issues long before they became a source of regulatory/policy concern. Drawing on a range of sources (including parliamentary inquiries, medical literature and contemporary newspapers) this paper provides an account of all three types of struggle. It also emphasises that the precarious nature of seafarer's employment is critical to understanding the health and safety of seafarers - just as it is today.

Bio: Michael Quinlan is professor of Industrial Relations in the School of Management and Director, Industrial Relations Research Centre at the University of New South Wales. He has published extensively on occupational health and safety (OHS), especially the effects of precarious work arrangements. Another study (with colleagues at the University of Sydney) examines the impact of workplace death on families. He has also written on the history of worker mobilisation and labour regulation in Australia and is currently involved in a project on collective action by convict workers with Dr Hamish Maxwell-Stewart (University of Tasmania). His most recent book is Ten Pathways to Death and Disaster: Learning from fatal incidents in mines and other high hazard workplaces (Federation Press, Sydney, 2014).


2nd Sep 2014 - 12:00 pm

Venue: Room 214/215, Economics and Business Building (H69)

Speaker: Professor Ali Danisman, Çukurova University

Title: Institutional logics and national polities: a comparative study in the health care field


13th Oct 2014 - 12:00 pm

Venue: Room 214/215, Economics and Business Building (H69)

Speaker: Dr Eric Knight, The University of Sydney

Title: The role of top management teams in enabling and sustaining contextual ambidexterity


25th Nov 2014 - 12:00 pm

Venue: Room 214/215, Economics and Business Building (H69)

Speaker: A/Prof Eddy Ng, Dalhousie University

Title: Why I do research on inequality: an autoethnography


2nd Dec 2014 - 01:00 pm

Venue: Rm 214/215 Economics and Business Building (H69)

Speaker: Cameron White,

Title: A half way house: The global context of migration from Sydney to San Francisco during the Californian Gold Rush, 1849-1851

The BLHG will be holding a public seminar on “‘A half way house’: The global context of migration from Sydney to San Francisco during the Californian Gold Rush, 1849-1851” on Tuesday 2 December in Room 214/215 in Building H69 between 1-2pm. A meeting for Business School members of BLHG will proceed the seminar at 12.30 in the same venue. The abstract for the talk can be found below.

The speaker will be Cameron White whose biographical details are below.

If you are interested in attending please contact Andre Pinto at wos.admin@sydney.edu.au by noon on Friday 28 November as refreshments will be served.

Abstract

News of the discovery of gold in California arrived in Sydney via Honolulu on December 23, 1848. In the proceeding 36 Months (7 January 1849 to 31 December 1851) 4,606 men, women and children departed Sydney for San Francisco. The historiography of these migrants has been dominated by the dominant view, in San Francisco, that the city was being inundated by ‘Australian robbers and murderers.’ A closer look reveals greater complexity. Evidence from the Australian end foregrounds four dominant characteristics. Firstly, these Australian gold rush migrants had originally travelled from Britain to New South Wales before moving on to San Francisco. Secondly, they had travelled from Britain to New South Wales as free migrants (not as convicts). Thirdly, they were assisted as opposed to unassisted migrants (meaning that they had received assistance from the colonial government for their passage paid from the sale of Crown Lands). Fourthly, they were predominantly skilled, urban tradesmen as opposed to the agricultural labourers that were primarily required by the major landholders of New South Wales. Accordingly, this paper situates the migration from Sydney-San Francisco in the context of migration from Britain-New South Wales. It focuses on the window of opportunity that opened in 1848 that enabled skilled migrants (tradesmen, artisans and mechanics) to receive colonial assistance for their passage. This window of opportunity, as well as the conditions of labour in New South Wales at that time (1848-1850) provides a unique perspective on who migrated Sydney to San Francisco during the Californian Gold Rush, why they migrated, and their contribution (in terms of skills and labour) on encountering the booming economic conditions prevalent in San Francisco.

Biography

Cameron White is a historian by training. He wrote his PhD in the History Department at the University of Sydney. Since that time he was worked on projects that examine the clothing industry in New South Wales (UTS), the tobacco industry in the United States (University of British Columbia) and the contemporary road construction industry in Australia (Swinburne University). His Sydney-San Francisco project emerged from his PhD research and was initially funded by an Australian Academy of the Humanities Travelling Fellowship.


9th Dec 2014 - 09:30 am

Venue: Room 214/215, Economics and Business Building (H69)

Speaker: Dariusz Wójcik, Oxford University

Title: International financial centres in the wake of the crisis: the case of Sydney