Lectures

UPCOMING LECTURES

Antigone and the Autocrats

Antigone

Professor Simon Goldhill, Cambridge University

There is no play from antiquity which has had a more significant impact on the discourse of autocracy than the Antigone, especially since the hugely influential arguments of Hegel. This paper suggests that the play's understanding of autocracy has been systematically misunderstood in 20th and 21st century criticism – including my own! – and suggests a different way of understanding the drama's dynamics. This very discussion will open out into a debate about how feminism and other contemporary political readings of the play are complicit with a misguided notion of heroism at the heart of the discourse of autocracy and its resistance.

Thursday 26 July 2018
6:30pm
Eastern Avenue Auditorium
Building F19
Click here for map

The lecture will be followed by a reception at CCANESA.
Click here for map

RSVP
Please RSVP to:

PREVIOUS EVENTS

5th William Ritchie Memorial Lecture

Walking with Socrates: An Exploration of Greek Philosophy

Professor Tim Whitmarsh, University of Cambridge

The Department of Classics and Ancient History are pleased to announce the 5th William Ritchie Memorial Lecture will be held on September 15, 2017 at the University of Sydney.

Walking with Socrates: An Exploration of Greek Philosophy

Abstract: We tend to think of philosophy in the abstract: we think of universal ideas and arguments floating free over time and space. In Athens, however, the incubator of much philosophical thought, debates took place in real environments, spaces within the city that had their own distinctive textures and resonances. In this paper I consider how the topography of Athens may have shaped the reception of Greek philosophies, and may even have influenced the ideas within the schools themselves.

Established in 2008, the William Ritchie Memorial Lecture invites a leading scholar of Hellenic antiquity to visit the University of Sydney every two years to deliver a public lecture in memory of the life and work of the late William Ritchie. Bill Ritchie was a devoted teacher and scholar of Classical Greek in the University of Sydney from 1955 until his death in July 2004 (Professor of Classical Greek from 1965 to 1991). This event is made possible by Professor Ritchie’s very generous bequest to the University, which also endows a Professorship in Classics within the Department of Classics and Ancient History and promotes a range of research plans.

Professor Whitmarsh

Professor Whitmarsh is the A.G. Leventis Professor of Greek Culture, Faculty of Classics at the University of Cambridge.

Where: PLEASE NOTE NEW VENUE LECTURE NOW AT CCANESA

When: Friday 15th Sept. 6.00pm


The lecture will be followed by a reception in CCANESA

Please RSVP to

Link to the online flyer or download a copy here

Check back regularly for our 2017 events programme or sign up for the CCANESA Newsletter

22nd Todd Memorial Lecture

The Todd Memorial Lectures are held every two years to commemorate the life and work of Professor Frederick Augustus Todd. The next distinguished Classical scholar in this series is Professor Greg Woolf from the Institute of Classical Studies, at the University of London who will deliver a lecture on Thursday 24 August 2017.

How Cosmopolitan was Imperial Rome?

Abstract: Rome, vast, swollen with immigrants from all the hinterlands of the inland sea, has often seemed the paradeigmatic cosmopolis, a world in a city, a city that encompassed the world. Modern historians of ancient Rome have often reached for parallels with London, Paris, New York or Mumbai in trying to understand the social texture of Europe’s first World City. But what if ancient cosmopoleis were not like modern ones? What if the different processes through which they were formed and repeatedly refilled were not the same as those that built and build the megacities of modernity. I shall be drawing on migration studies and new work on ancient connectivity to argue for the difference of ancient Rome, trying to sketch the outlines of an Alien Cosmopolis, that to our eyes seems strangely homogenous compared to the great cities of the twenty first century.

Professor Greg Woolf

Prof. Greg Woolf


Professor Woolf is the Director of the Institute of Classical Studies, University of London. His research concerns the history and archaeology of the ancient world at the very large scale. Current projects include books on urbanism and on mobility, ongoing collaborations on ancient library culture and he leads a major collaborative research project, into the role of sanctuaries in forming religious experience.

When: Thursday 24th Aug. 6.00pm
Where: General Lecture Theatre, Quadrangle, A14

Please RSVP to:

Keynote Lectures - AMPHORAE XI Conference 2017

As part of the AMPHORAE XI Conference two public lectures will be given by Professor Peter Wilson and Dr Estelle Lazer from the Department of Classics and Ancient History, University of Sydney.

Prof. Peter Wilson: A potted political history of the Sicilian theatre (to ca. 300)
Wednesday 12 July 2017
5-6:30pm, General Lecture Theatre

Dr Estelle Lazer: Interim Report on The Pompeii Cast Restoration Project
Thursday 13 July 2017
5.00-6.30pm, New Law Lecture Theatre 101


NEAF Saturday Lecture series: Trade in the Ancient World

From Saturday 24th June 2017 to 29 July 2017

With the development of the 'new' Silk Road – One Belt and One Road Project – linking China with the wider world comes the discussion of what were the ancient routes that are the foundation of this new enterprise. How was the ancient world interconnected through trade? What really is trade and how does it connect us? Be it obsidian from far Eastern Turkey, amber from the Baltic, gold from Nubia, silk from China or frankincense from Oman, these goods were traded, over vast distances, by land and sea, interlinking the populations along their routes of travel.

This series of lectures will examine the commodities traded, the routes they travelled and the effects this had on the cultures along the trade routes and far beyond.

Saturday, 24th June
Shipwrecks: Trade Frozen in Time
Dr Stephen Bourke: The Ulu Burun Wreck
Maree Brown: Bajo de la Campana
Dr John Tidmarsh: The Antikythera Wreck

Saturday, July 1st
Dr Kate da Costa: Scientific Analysis of Trade Routes and Trade Objects
Dr Wendy Reade: Looking into Glass

Saturday, July 8th
Maree Brown: Grain, Gold and Gossamer: Egypt Trade during Pharaonic Period
Dr Stephen Bourke: The Phoenicians: Sea-Merchants of the Ancient World

Saturday, July 15th
Dr John Tidmarsh: Leaving the Jade Gate: Travels along the Silk Route

Saturday, July 22nd
Dr Kate da Costa: Bread and Circuses: Late Roman and Byzantine Trade around the Inland Sea

Saturday, July 29th
Dr John Tidmarsh: From Sheba to Petra: Along the Incense and Monsoon Routes

For more upcoming NEAF events visit the NEAF webpage for details

Dynamic Cartographies before maps: Borderless Ancient Italy - Elena Isayev

Orbis Terrarum

Orbis Terrarum - Proposed Reconstruction of 1st c. AD map by Marcus Agrippa

Sponsored by the AAIA and the Department of Classics and Ancient History, on June 8th Elena Isayev (University of Exeter), current Fellow of the Humanities Research Centre at ANU, will be presenting a seminar entitled Dynamic Cartographies before maps: Borderless Ancient Italy. The seminar considers the nature of early cartographic creations, particularly in light of the absence of regional scale maps in the ancient world.

Professor Isayev is an historian who uses the ancient Mediterranean as a way to explore migration, belonging and the construction of place. Her research and teaching interests range from histories of pre-Roman groups in Italy, through material remains, to deconstructing theories of generation conflict and youth in republican Rome. Currently she is focusing on ancient mobility and spacial perception.

When: Thursday, June 8, 4:15pm
Where: CCANESA Boardroom

National Archaeology Week: The Archaeology of War and Conflict

As part of National Archaeology Week, ArchSoc and CCANESA present a lecture by forensic archaeologist Kerrie Grant. Kerrie has worked in Jordan, Morocco, Nigeria, Cyprus and the United Arab Emirates, and was part of the team that uncovered the 12,000-year-old remains of "the hobbit" Homo floresiensis in Indonesia. For this lecture she provides insights into the world of forensic archaeology based on her experiences in Iraq and Libya.

The Archaeology of War and Conflict
Recovering human remains during an ongoing conflict requires many logistical, professional, security and cultural aspects to work together if success in telling the victims' stories is to be achieved. This lecture compares the forensic archaeological work carried out in Iraq, after the capture of Saddam Hussein, with that in Libya, after the fall of Gaddafi.

For more information and bookings, visit the National Archaeology Week website.

When: Wednesday, May 24, 6pm-8pm
Where: CCANESA Boardroom

Like Frogs around a Pond: Maritime religion in ancient Greek culture - Dr Amelia Brown

On the 22nd of March, the AAIA will host a lecture by Dr Amelia Brown, Senior Lecturer in Greek History and Language at the University of Queensland. Dr Brown looks to the disparate groups of Greeks who lived in various city states and colonies around the Mediterranean and yet managed to retain a common culture. Examining sources from ancient testimonia to archaeological shipwrecks, Dr Brown reveals “a durable yet flexible network of travelling rituals and beliefs which bound the ancient Greeks together in unexpected and close-knit ways, even across great distances and without political bonds”

This is a free event. For bookings, click here or email arts.aaia@sydney.edu.au

Wednesday March 22, 2017, 6:30pm
CCANESA Boardroom
Madsen Building, level 4, Room 480
The University of Sydney

AAIA Visiting Professor 2016 - Professor Katja Sporn

Professor Sporn

During August and September the AAIA will be hosting a series of public lectures and seminars by Professor Katja Sporn of the German Archaeological Institute at Athens in their 2016 Visiting Professor series.

Professor Sporn is the Director of the German Archaeological Institute at Athens and a professor at the University of Munich. Her fields of expertise range from Crete in the Classical and Hellenistic period through to Greek funerary art and religion.

All Sydney events to be held in the Boardroom at CCANESA

Public Lectures

Monday August 1, 6.00pm
Natural Features in Greek Cult Places. The Case of Athens

Wednesday August 10, 6.00pm
Ancient Phokis. Settlements, Fortifications and Sanctuaries

Download the lecture flyer here

For further details and to book for the lectures visit the AAIA website

Seminars

Tuesday 2 August, 3:00pm
Aigina Kolonna. The Development of a Bronze Age Settlement into a
Greek Sanctuary
Download the seminar flyer here

Tuesday 9 August, 3:00pm
Communal Rituals and Religious Acts. Problems of Definition
Download the seminar flyer here

Breaking New Ground - National Archaeology Week

In support of National Archaeology Week 2016, members of the Centre for Classical and Near Eastern Studies of Australia present glimpses into their research. Interested students and general public alike are invited to attend an evening of short talks and informal discussion.

Breaking New Ground introduces current research into Prehistoric Kashmir, the early Iranian copper industry, the Geometric period settlement of Zagora on the Cycladic island of Andros, and the Throne of the Priest of Dionysos in the theatre at Athens.

Throne

Speakers:
Professor Margaret Miller
Associate Professor Lesley Beaumont
Professor Alison Betts
Professor Barbara Helwing

The talks will be followed by light refreshments in the foyer at CCANESA.

When
Monday, 16 May, 2016
7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

Where
CCANESA Boardroom
Level 4 Madsen Building, Eastern Avenue, University of Sydney

To locate Madsen Building on a campus map click here

Admission is free but please register by emailing us at to help us with planning.

Click here to download a copy of the flyer

To find out more about other events for National Archaeology Week go to the National Archaeology Week website

NEAF lecture, May 18 - Fire Temples and Towers of Silence: Zoroastrian Architectural Legacies

A lecture by Professor Alison Betts, University of Sydney

The Council of the Near Eastern Archaeology Foundation invite you to the next event in their series of public lectures to be given by Professor Betts, Professor of Silk Road Studies in the Department of Archaeology.

Abstract: The Zoroastrian tradition has its roots in Central Asia in the first or even the second millennium BCE but we see little of it in the material record until a massive floruit in Sasanian times from the 3rd century CE onwards. This talk will provide a background to the rise of the Zoroastrian tradition and the material and architectural evidence that tells its story.

When: Wednesday 18 May 2016, 6.30 to 7.30pm followed by a light supper.

Where: Centre for Classical and Near Eastern Studies of Australia (CCANESA)
Level 4, Madsen Building F09
University of Sydney

Entry off Eastern Avenue

Bookings are essential for this event. and it is preferable to organise prepayment by 13 May.

For further information on booking and payment for the lecture please click here.

Click here to download a copy of the flyer

NEAF lecture, April 6 - The Visible Dead: Dolmens and the landscape in Bronze Age Levant

A lecture by Dr James Fraser, The British Museum.

Abstract: Megalithic dolmen tombs are some of the most striking features in the archaeological landscape of the southern Levant. Yet their visibility has made them an easy target for tomb robbers over the last 5000 years. Consequently, archaeologists have struggled to place these mysterious monuments into their true cultural contexts. This lecture presents the results of recent NEAF-funded fieldwork investigating a dolmen cemetery in Jordan. This fieldwork underscores a new theory that proposes that highly-visible dolmen tombs helped reconfigure the ways in which people engaged with the landscape in the 4th millennium BCE, a time when the region’s earliest civilisations developed a new urban way of life.

When: Wednesday 6 April 2016, 6.30 to 7.30pm followed by a light supper.

Where: Centre for Classical and Near Eastern Studies of Australia (CCANESA)
Level 4 Madsen Building F09
University of Sydney

Entry off Eastern Avenue

Bookings are essential for this event. We prefer prepayment by 1 April 2016

For information on booking and payment for the lecture please click here.

4th William Ritchie Memorial Lecture

Professor Jan N. Bremmer, University of Groningen, Netherlands

The Department of Classics and Ancient History are pleased to announce the Fourth William Ritchie Memorial Lecture will be held on March 17, 2016 at the University of Sydney. The lecture is to be delivered by Professor Jan N. Bremmer, University of Groningen, Netherlands and is entitled, The Beginning, Middle and End of Animal Sacrifice.

All are welcome to attend. The lecture is free and no RSVP is required.

Date: Thursday 17 March
Time: 7.00pm
Location: General Lecture Theatre, A14 - The Quadrangle

Download a copy the flyer here

The William Ritchie Memorial Lecture was established in 2008. Every second year a leading scholar of Hellenic antiquity visits the University of Sydney to deliver a public lecture in memory of the life and work of the late William Ritchie. Bill Ritchie was a devoted teacher and scholar of Classical Greek in the University of Sydney from 1955 until his death in July 2004 (Professor of Classical Greek from 1965 to 1991). This event is made possible by Professor Ritchie’s very generous bequest to the University, which also endows a Professorship in Classics within the Department of Classics and Ancient History and promotes a range of research plans.

A reception will be held after the lecture at CCANESA, Madsen Building - entry off Eastern Avenue:

Reception venue: CCANESA,
Level 4, Room 480
Madsen Building, University of Sydney

Click here to check location on campus maps.

The Anthony McNicoll Visiting Lecture 2016

Professor Ian Hodder, Professor of Anthropology and Dunlevie Family Professor at Stanford University

Date: Wednesday 16 March
Time: 7 to 8pm
Venue: Eastern Avenue Lecture Theatre, Eastern Avenue, The University of Sydney

UNDERSTANDING ÇATALHÖYÜK AND THE ORIGINS OF SETTLED LIFE

This talk will summarise 22 years of excavation at the 9000 year-old Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük in central Turkey. The site was first excavated by James Mellaart in the 1960s and recent research has led to many changes in the way the site is understood. The talk will focus on some aspects of this new understanding, particularly with regard to social and political organisation, burial practices and history making.

An additional focus will be on how inter-personal violence was managed in a town that contained up to 8000 people. The new understanding of Çatalhöyük is also shown to be relevant for other sites in the Middle East and for the adoption of agriculture and settled life.

The Anthony McNicoll Visiting Lecture is presented by the Anthony McNicoll Visiting Lectureship and the Department of Archaeology.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER:
Professor Ian Hodder is Professor of Anthropology and Dunlevie Family Professor at Stanford University, California. Awarded a PhD by the University of Cambridge for research on spatial analysis in archaeology in 1974, Professor Hodder went on to conduct excavations in the United Kingdom and Italy and ethnographic fieldwork in Sudan and Kenya. He was the Director-General of the Cambridge Archaeological Unit from 1990 to 2001, the Director of Training, Education, Management and Prehistory in the Eastern Mediterranean from 2002 to 2004, and is currently Co-Investigator of an Economic and Social Research Council funded project entitled ‘Ritual, Community and Conflict’.

Professor Hodder has directed excavations and conservation at the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük in central Turkey from 1993. Consisting of an international team of archaeologists, the Çatalhöyük Research Project has shed light on the development of one of the world’s earliest societies and the transition of its people from hunting and gathering to agriculture and urbanism. In 2002 he was awarded the National Prize by the Turkish Minister of Culture for scientific contributions to Turkish archaeology.

Professor Hodder has drawn on the archaeology of Çatalhöyük in his recent theory of entanglement. This theory builds on his longstanding interest in the interrelationship of humans and the material world as a defining characteristic of human history and culture.

Professor Hodder is the author and editor of some 38 volumes and monographs. Among his publications are Symbols in Action (1982), Reading the Past (1986), The Domestication of Europe (1990), The Archaeological Process (1999), Çatalhöyük: The Leopard’s Tale (2006), and Entangled: An archaeology of the Relationship between Humans and Things (2012).

Details on the venue and how to register can be found here

Workshop: Human-Thing Entanglement: Some New Approaches

Professor Ian Hodder, Professor of Anthropology and Dunlevie Family Professor at Stanford University, California, U.S.A.

Professor Hodder is visiting Australia in March as the 2016 Anthony McNicoll Visiting Lecturer. and will be presenting a workshop for post-graduates at CCANESA during his visit to Sydney.

Awarded a PhD by the University of Cambridge for research on spatial analysis in archaeology in 1974, Professor Hodder went on to conduct excavations in the United Kingdom and Italy, and ethnographic fieldwork in Sudan and Kenya. He was the Director-General of the Cambridge Archaeological Unit from 1990 to 2001, the Director of Training, Education, Management and Prehistory in the Eastern Mediterranean from 2002 to 2004, and is currently Co-Investigator of an Economic and Social Research Council funded project entitled ‘Ritual, Community and Conflict’.

Professor Hodder has directed excavations and conservation at the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük in central Turkey from 1993. Consisting of an international team of archaeologists, the Çatalhöyük Research Project has shed light on the development of one of the world’s earliest societies and the transition of its people from hunting and gathering to agriculture and urbanism. In 2002 he was awarded the National Prize by the Turkish Minister of Culture for scientific contributions to Turkish archaeology.

Professor Hodder is the author and editor of some 38 volumes and monographs. Among his publications are Symbols in Action (1982), Reading the Past (1986), The Domestication of Europe (1990), The Archaeological Process (1999), Çatalhöyük: The Leopard’s Tale (2006), and Entangled: An archaeology of the Relationship between Humans and Things (2012).

The subject of Professor Hodder's workshop, the theory of entanglement, draws on the archaeology of Çatalhöyük. This theory builds on his longstanding interest in the interrelationship of humans and the material world as a defining characteristic of human history and culture.

Location: Centre for Classical and Near Eastern Studies,
Level 4, Madsen Building
University of Sydney

Date & Time: Tuesday 15 March
10:00am – 2:00pm

Registration required as places are limited. Please register your interest by Friday 11 March to Ana Becerra at ana.becerra@sydney.edu.au

A copy of the flyer can be downloaded here

Workshop: Clan and Family Structures in Roman Italy

Professor Christopher Smith, the Director of the British School at Rome, will be making a short visit to Sydney following the ASCS conference in Melbourne.

During that visit, he will conduct a Masterclass on the topic ‘Clan and Family Structures in Roman Italy’ in the Boardroom of CCANESA on Monday 8 February at 2pm. The class will revisit and update some of the issues raised in his book of 2006, The Roman Clan: The Gens from Ancient Ideology to Modern Anthropology.

Postgraduate students are particularly welcome, but the seminar is open to everyone.

In the evening, Professor Smith will deliver a public lecture at Macquarie University on the topic

Saving the city: the preservation and conservation of Rome from Antiquity to the present day

Details of the lecture can be found here.

Please feel free to pass this message on to anyone who might be interested in attending either event.

Workshop: Religious and Cultural Elements Shaping Iranian Civilisation

The Association of Iranica in Australia is presenting a series of lectures at CCANESA on Saturday 10 October 2015 from 1:30-5:00pm. The workshop is entitled Religious and Cultural Elements Shaping Iranian Civilisation: an historical and literary survey from ancient to contemporary times.

Workshop Programme
Presentations:
Emeritus Professor Garry Trompf: "The Influence of Zoroastrianism on other religions, both old and new"
Dr Zahra Taheri, Lecturer in Persian Language & Iranian Studies, ANU: "Women in Persian Sufi Literature".
Dr Naser Ghobadzadeh: Australian Catholic University: "Theological foundation of secularity in post-revolutionary Iran"

Afternoon tea break

Musical Performance
Panel discussion Q & A
Closing remarks

All are welcome to attend. Tickets are $10 for Adults and $5 for students. Please direct all booking inquiries to:
or contact Masoud Rowshan Mobile: 0434400637

A copy of the flyer can be downloaded here

Comparative Clytemnestras - Friday September 25, 4.00 - 6.00pm, CCANESA, Room 480, Level 4, Madsen Building

Professor Rush Rehm, Professor, Theater and Performance Studies, and Classics Artistic Director, Stanford Repertory Theater (SRT).
Courtney Walsh as Clytemnestra

Courtney Walsh as Clytemnestra

The Department of Classics and Ancient History invites students and researchers to a one-off lecture/performance focused on the dramatic figure of Clytemnestra. Although never entitling a Greek tragedy, Clytemnestra is the only character in the Oresteia who appears in all three plays. Aeschylus’ explosive transformation of her role from Homer’s account in the Odyssey proved irresistible to the later tragedians. Clytemnestra plays a key role in the Electra plays of Sophocles and Euripides, and also in Euripides’ Iphigenia in Aulis. By experiencing her various theatrical manifestations in performance, we can engage our critical response to her character and the plays she inhabits in a more informed and rewarding manner.
In an 80-minute presentation, actress Courtney Walsh performs a series of Clytemnestra’s monologues from the aforementioned plays, each followed by analysis from Rush Rehm that explores thematic parallels based on the following topoi:

1) speech, shame, silence, unsaying
2) fear, sleeplessness, nightmare
3) wealth, ownership, dispossession
4) matural growth and unnatural ends: roots, trees, harvest, felling
(applied to the killing of Iphigenia and Agamemnon)
5) wayward sex (excessive, repressed, or irregular)
6) peripeteia signaled by ritual and its disruption

An extensive handout allows the audience to explore the inter-textual relationships across the different versions of her story. We follow the formal presentation with a question and answer period, which can range from issues of dating Euripides’ and Sophocles’ Electras to the challenges facing a contemporary actor playing the role Clytemnestra. We have adjusted the presentation to focus solely on Clytemnestra in the Oresteia, when that makes more pedagogical sense.

We have presented “Comparative Clytemnestras” at the Classical Association annual conference (UK), and at the University of Amsterdam, the Freie Universität in Berlin, Stanford University (for Structured Liberal Education, a now annual event), Trinity University (San Antonio), San Francisco State University, and the University of Utah.

A professional actress who works primarily in the San Francisco Bay Area, Courtney Walsh trained at Yale University. In addition to film and television work Walsh has appeared in major theaters in San Francisco, and is a core member of Stanford Repertory Theater. She recently played Winnie in SRT’s bilingual production of Beckett’s Happy Days/Oh les beaux jours in Paris.

Professor of Theater and Classics, Rush Rehm is Artistic Director of Stanford Repertory Theater. He is author of several books on Greek tragedy, including Greek Tragic Theatre, Marriage to Death: The Conflation of Wedding and Funeral Rituals in Greek Tragedy; The Play of Space: Spatial Transformation in Greek Tragedy; and Radical Theatre: Greek Tragedy and the Modern World.

PUBLIC LECTURE: AN INEXPLICABLE ABUNDANCE - Investigating the Iron Age site of Saruq al-Hadid

Professor Lloyd Weeks, University of New England

The Council of the Near Eastern Archaeology Foundation invite you to the next in their series of public lectures to be presented by Professor Weeks on excavations at Saruq al-Hadid in Dubai, United Arab Emirates.

Abstract: The site of Saruq al-Hadid has revealed an assemblage of archaeological artefacts, mostly of Iron Age date, that is unprecedented in its scale and diversity. The thousands of bronze, iron, and gold artefacts from the site, accompanied by evidence for copper smelting and working, have dramatically challenged existing ideas about the nature and development of Iron Age communities in south-eastern Arabia. What is most intriguing about this material is its depositional context: artefacts are apparently randomly spread across a large area within the dune systems of the northern tip of the Rub al-Khali (or Empty Quarter) desert, in an area that currently lacks almost any identifiable settlement remains or resources that might be useful for primary metal production. As part of a new collaborative research project investigating Saruq al-Hadid, Professor Weeks will outline the approaches being used to study and conserve the artefacts and deposits from the site, and the efforts to understand why and how this enigmatic site came to be.

Wednesday 2 September 2015, 6:30 to 7:30pm followed by a light supper.

Centre for Classical and Near Eastern Studies of Australia (CCANESA),
Level 4, Room 480, Madsen Building-F09,
University of Sydney

A copy of the lecture flyer with further details can be downloaded here.

For enquires and to RSVP: P +61 2 9351 4151 | F +61 2 9114 0921 | or email


PUBLIC LECTURE: Athenian White-Ground Lekythoi: Masterpieces of Greek Funerary Art

Professor John Oakley, AAIA Visiting Professor 2015

Professor John Oakley of College of William and Mary (Virginia, USA) will be touring Australia in August and September as the 2015 AAIA Visiting Professor. Professor Oakley is a world-renowned specialist in Greek vase painting and iconography, and Roman sarcophagi. He will give a series of lectures and seminars on Greek sculpture and vase painting and their impact upon modern society, as well as workshops on attribution. His tour will take him to Sydney, Adelaide, Perth, Brisbane, Newcastle, Armidale, Melbourne, Hobart and Canberra.

Abstract: The images found on classical Athenian white-lekythoi are the subject of this lecture. These oil containers were placed in and on Athenian tombs as grave gifts and therefore, not surprisingly, often have scenes connected with graves and funerals, making them very important documents for understanding ancient Greek funerary rites. In fact, they are the primary source of funerary images from fifth-century Athens and are found in nearly every museum whose holdings include Greek art, since they are often considered the most beautiful of Greek vases.

This lecture examines the development of the standard themes found on white lekythoi, namely two women in a domestic setting, the visit to the tomb, and the mythological ministers of death: Hermes, the ferryman Charon, and the brothers Hypnos (sleep) and Thanatos (death). And it synthesizes what these scenes tell us about classical Athenian perceptions of and reactions to death.

Wednesday 19 August, 6:00pm
in the CCANESA Boardroom
Level 4 Madsen Building
University of Sydney

This event is free but bookings are essential. Further details can be found here

Masterclass introducing the post-classical world

August 4 (Tuesdsay) 1-4 pm in the CCANESA Board Room

The Masterclass is primarily for students of PHIL3639: Hellenistic Philosophy, but open for general auditing. Students will be given the primary opportunity for discussion.

1:00-1:40 The Academy after Plato (Rick Benitez, Sydney)
1:45-2:25 The Lyceum after Aristotle (Han Baltussen, Adelaide)
2:35-3:15 Hellenistic Culture (Alastair Blanshard, Queensland)
3:20-4:00 Hellenistic Philosophy through the eyes of a Stoic (Ada Bronowski, Oxford)

NATIONAL ARCHAEOLOGY WEEK 2015 : A Day's Digging

In support of National Archaeology Week, a forum for the presentation of current archaeological fieldwork projects by members of CCANESA to interested members of the public and students. Sites included the Hellenistic/Roman theatre at Nea Paphos on Cyprus, the Geometric period settlement of Zagora on the Cycladic island of Andros, the cult site of Kato Phana on the east Greek island of Chios, ancient Pella in the foothills of the Jordan Valley, and the royal city of Akchakhan-kala in Uzbekistan.

Programme:
9:30am for a 10:00am start.

  • 10:00 - 10:45 Professor Alison Betts (Akchkhan-kala)
    "Power and Propaganda in Ancient Choresmia."
  • 10:45 - 11:30 Dr Hugh Thomas (Zagora)
    "Aerial photography and 3D modelling at the Geometric site of Zagora."
  • 11:30 - 11:45 Morning Tea (included)
  • 11:45 - 12:30 Associate Professor Lesley Beaumont (Kato Phana)
    "The Kato Phana Archaeological Project, Chios."
  • 12:30 - 1:15 Lunch Break
  • 1:15 - 2:00 Dr Craig Barker (Paphos)
    "Performance and Pottery: 20 years of excavation in the Hellenistic-Roman theatre precinct of Nea Paphos in Cyprus."
  • 2:00 - 2:45 Dr Stephen Bourke (Pella)
    "Fortress, Temple and Town: Digging up Ancient Pella in Jordan."


A copy of the lecture flyer can be downloaded here.

Saturday 23 May 2015, 10:00am - 2:45pm

Centre for Classical and Near Eastern Studies of Australia (CCANESA),
Level 4, Madsen Building-F09,
University of Sydney

Cost: $25.00 includes morning tea and light lunch.

Bookings essential. For enquiries and to RSVP: Susan Wrigley at swri6087@uni.sydney.edu.au
Please RSVP by Monday 18 May 2015.


PUBLIC LECTURE: The Great God Ahuramazda: New Discoveries from the Akchakhan-kala Wall Paintings

The Council of the Near Eastern Archaeology Foundation invite you to our series of public lectures. Professor Alison Betts is Professor of Silk Road Studies at the University of Sydney and the Director of the University of Sydney Central Asian Programme. Professor Betts’s research interests include the Epipalaeolithic to Bronze Age Levant on the arable/steppe margins, the pre- and proto-history of Central Asia, the background to Zoroastrianism, nomadic peoples, nomad/state relations, early pastoral communities, game drives, lithic studies, graffiti and rock art, and the prehistory of herbal medicine.

Abstract: The massive fortified royal seat of Akchakhan-kala has been under excavation by a team from the University of Sydney and members of the Karakalpak Academy of Sciences for twenty years. Akchakhan-kala is particularly remarkable for its wealth of well- preserved wall paintings and clay sculpture. A recently cleaned painting has revealed spectacular new image which is linked, for the first time, to explicit Zoroastrian imagery. This is forcing a rethink of the early history of this important world religion.

Wednesday 13 May 2015, 6:30 to 7:30pm followed by a light supper.

Centre for Classical and Near Eastern Studies of Australia (CCANESA),
Level 4, Madsen Building-F09,
University of Sydney

A copy of the lecture flyer with further details can be downloaded here.
Please RSVP by 8 May 2015.

For enquires and to RSVP: P +61 2 9351 4151 | F +61 2 9114 0921 | or email

PUBLIC LECTURE: Archaeology in Palestine

The Council of the Near Eastern Archaeology Foundation invite you to the first of their public lectures for 2015 to be presented by Dr Ross Burns, former career officer of the Department of Foreign Affairs and PhD at Macquarie University. Dr Burns has published two books on the history of Syria and is completing a history of Aleppo for Routledge.

Abstract: The archaeology of Palestine is vital to our understanding of the history of the Middle East, yet the work being done at the major sites of the West Bank receives little attention even among experts. In spite of the difficult political environment, work is being undertaken at a number of sites by local and foreign teams. This talk will take you on a tour of some of the most interesting places: Bethlehem, Herodium, Hebron/Mamre, Jericho, Nablus/Tell Balata, Samaria/Sebasteia and Mount Gerizim (originally the cult centre of the Samaritans). The lecture will finish with a quick visit to the Haram al-Sharif in Jerusalem and the environs of the platform of the Herodian Temple.

Wednesday 22 April 2015, 6:30pm

Centre for Classical and Near Eastern Studies of Australia (CCANESA),
Level 4, Madsen Building-F09,
University of Sydney

A copy of the lecture flyer with further details can be downloaded here.
Please RSVP by 17 April 2015.

For enquires and to RSVP: P +61 2 9351 4151 | F +61 2 9114 0921 | or email

PUBLIC LECTURE: The Year of Digging Dangerously - Salvage excavations at Tell Arqa

The Council of the Near Eastern Archaeology Foundation invite you to the next in their series of public lectures to be presented by Dr Hanan Charaf Mullins who is visiting Sydney as one of two NEAF Apollo Fellowship recipients for 2014. Dr Hanan Charaf Mullins is a research associate at the University of Paris I, Panthéon-Sorbonne, France specialising in the interconnections between Lebanon and its neighbouring regions during the Middle and Late Bronze Age period. She is affiliated with the Tell Arqa and Sidon excavations.

Abstract: In October 2010, a Byzantine tomb was discovered during agricultural activities in the rocky hills surrounding the ancient site of Tell Arqa (ancient Irqata mentioned in the Egyptian Amarna Texts). Salvage excavations conducted by the author under police protection in dangerous conditions, in an area known for its tomb looters, led to the discovery of at least one chamber tomb of the arcosolium type. The tomb was entirely covered with white plaster and sealed by a door. It contained three rock-carved sarcophagi and a cist tomb, all of which yielded a rich array of gold and silver jewellery, coins, and pottery. More than 50 lamps were found, most of them deposited on the floor of the tomb. Amongst them, a lamp depicting a menorah that could indicate that at least one of the dead was Jewish. This is not exceptional as we know from texts that the Tell Arqa housed a synagogue. The perfect state of preservation of this tomb is unique to northern Lebanon where the majority of ancient tombs are found looted. Thus, the Tell Arqa tomb offers a unique occasion to study the funerary practices of the family or the community which used it.

Wednesday 17 September 2014, 6.30 to 8.30pm

Centre for Classical and Near Eastern Studies of Australia (CCANESA),
Level 4, Madsen Building-F09,
University of Sydney

Ticket price includes a light supper and bookings are essential for this event. A copy of the lecture flyer with further details can be downloaded here.

For enquires and to RSVP: P +61 2 9351 4151 | F +61 2 9114 0921 | or email

PUBLIC LECTURE: Prehistoric Prasteio Mesorotsos, Cyprus

The Council of the Near Eastern Archaeology Foundation invite you to the next in their series of public lectures to be presented by Dr Andrew McCarthy, Director of the Cyprus American Archaeological Research Institute (CAARI). Dr McCarthy is visiting Australia briefly and we are delighted to host this presentation on the recent excavations at the site of Prasteio Mesorotsos, Cyprus.

The site was inhabited throughout most of the periods of Cypriot prehistory and history, and is located in the immediate hinterland of the first and most important temple to the goddess Aphrodite. The long sequence at this site is beginning to show evidence for a great deal of continuity and social memory, which was accompanied by an apparent reluctance to change as seen in the conservatism displayed in the habits of its prehistoric people. Such a rich and long history required a multidisciplinary approach to understand the sequence of development with the aid of a team assembled through the Cyprus American Archaeological Research Institute (CAARI). This paper will discuss the archaeology of Cyprus, the development of its culture through time, and the role that overseas research centres have in making sense of this information.

Thursday 28th August 2014, 6.30 to 8.30pm
Centre for Classical and Near Eastern Studies of Australia (CCANESA),
Level 4, Madsen Building-F09,
University of Sydney

Tickets for this event include a light supper and bookings are essential, preferably by 25th August for catering purposes. A copy of the lecture flyer with further details on ticket prices and payment methods can be downloaded here.
Unfortunately there is no facility for ticket sales on the night.

For enquires and to RSVP: P +61 2 9351 4151 | F +61 2 9114 0921 | or email
For further details of the lecture and for online payments please see the NEAF website

PUBLIC LECTURE: The archaeology of the desert cults and the origins of Israel's god

The Council of the Near Eastern Archaeology Foundation invite you to the next in their series of public lectures to be presented by Dr Juan Manuel Tebes, Associate Professor and Director of the Center of Studies of Ancient Near Eastern History, Catholic University of Argentina and Assistant Professor at the University of Buenos Aires. Dr Tebes is visiting Sydney as one of two NEAF Apollo Fellowship recipients for 2014.

Abstract: The idea that the origins of ancient Israel’s god, Yahweh, can be found in the arid southern margins south and south-east of Palestine (known as the “Midianite-Kenite hypothesis”), has a long history in biblical scholarship. However, adequate analyses of the
archaeological evidence of the arid areas of the southern Levant are few. In this lecture, instead of looking to the (mostly biblical) evidence of the origins of Yahwism and assuming its origin lies in movements of people from the southern regions to Canaan in the Early Iron Age, Dr Tebes will focus attention on the archaeology of the cultic practices in the Negev, southern Transjordan, and northern Hejaz during the entire Iron Age, and how this information is related to the religious practices known in Judah and Israel during the biblical period, providing new light on the prehistory of the cult of Yahweh. The evidence will be evaluated not as a single, exceptional event, but as long-term process within the several millennia history of cultic practices and beliefs of the local peoples.

Wednesday 6 August 2014, 6.30 to 8.30pm
Centre for Classical and Near Eastern Studies of Australia (CCANESA),
Level 4, Madsen Building-F09,
University of Sydney

Ticket price includes a light supper and bookings are essential for this event. A copy of the lecture flyer with further details can be downloaded here

For enquires and to RSVP: P +61 2 9351 4151 | F +61 2 9114 0921 | or email

PUBLIC LECTURE: Expanding the Horizons of "Geometric Zagora": The 2013 Season

Zagora Project co-directors

The Zagora Archaeological Project's co-Directors (l-r) Professor Margaret Miller, Associate Professor Lesley Beaumont and Dr Stavros Paspalas at the site of Zagora (Image: by Irma Havlicek, ©PHM).

The AAIA is hosting a public lecture by Professor Meg Miller on the Zagora Archaeological Project, to be held in CCANESA, Friday June 27.

The first full season of excavation at the 10th-8th century BC settlement at Zagora in almost 40 years took place in 2013. Eager to address the burning questions relating to the town: What was the economic basis of this flourishing town? How did people live? Was there a hierarchical or egalitarian social structure? Why did people want to leave?, the Zagora Archaeological Project set trenches at diverse locations across the site. Unexpected evidence for diversified economy, varied diet, and artistic exuberance crowned the enterprise.

Come and hear about the field season and enjoy some wine and refreshments with our team.

6:30pm, Friday June 27, 2014
CCANESA Lecture Theatre,
Madsen Building
University of Sydney

FREE: Bookings Essential. To RSVP click here.

Over the Moors, Take me to the Moors: Approaching the History of North Africa, c.300-700

Dr Andrew Merrills, Senior Lecturer in Ancient History at the University of Leicester, UK.
Wednesday 28 May 2014 6.30pm in CCANESA.

Lecture presented by the Department of Classics and Ancient History and the Ancient North African and Phoenician Diaspora research network (ANAPD). Dr Merrills is currently hosted by ANAPD to work on a new project concerning the ‘Moorish’ or ‘Berber’ polities which dominated the Maghrib between the eclipse of Roman power and the Arab Conquest (c.400-c.700 CE).

Lecture followed by drinks. For catering purposes, please rsvp by 20/5/14 to:

Fieldwork in Rough Cilicia, Turkey

Professor Michael Hoff from the University of Nebraska, USA
Wednesday 12th March 2014 6.30pm in CCANESA.

Discoveries at Ancient Sepphoris

Professors Eric and Carol Meyer from Duke University, USA
Monday 17th March 2014 6.30pm in CCANESA.

Foundations of Western Civilization - The East Mediterranean in the 4th & 3rd Millennia BCE

Over four Saturdays in March - 1st, 8th, 15th & 22nd March 2014
Dr Stephen Bourke, Dr Wendy Reade, Mrs Maree Browne and Mr Ben Churcher. 9.30am-2.00pm in CCANESA.