2011 Funded Research Projects - Project Descriptions

1421 A Year Chinese Ceramics Travelled to The World With Admiral Zheng He: Ceramics as an Vehicle of Trade and Foreign Relations in Ming China

Dr Li, Baoping; University of Sydney Postdoctoral Research Fellow; Angkor Research Program Facility; Department of Archaeology

Project Outline

Zheng He (or Cheng Ho) was a Ming dynasty diplomat and fleet admiral, who commanded voyages from Southeast Asia to East Africa from 1405 to 1433 (Levathes 1994; Doar 2005, in China Heritage Newsletter, No. 2, ANU). Ceramics were a staple product carried abroad Zheng He’s “treasure fleets”, which were used as diplomatic gifts and trade goods in their tributary-trade system. Large quantities of Chinese ceramics made around Zheng He period are found across SE Asia, and the well dated Ming ceramics constitute a critical scholarly tool for analysing the changing foci and interconnections of SE Asia, symbolised by the Zheng He voyages. This project will provide indices for assessing whether Chinese trade was significantly different into Island and Mainland SE Asia which is important for understanding China’s pattern of trade and diplomacy with its neighbours and the behaviour of those neighbours.

Funding
$25 000


The Past and Present of Chinese Medicine: pilot study on the identification and usage of medicinal plants in Xinjiang, China

Dr. Jia, Wei Ming (Peter); of Sydney Postdoctoral Research Fellow; Bronze Age In Xinjiang, China and East Aisan Archaeology; Department of Archaeology

Project Outline
Following the identification of prehistoric use of Chinese medicinal plants by University of Sydney researchers in 2010, a new and extremely important avenue of research has open up, involving a new collaborative relationship between Archaeology and Pharmacology. The project proposed here is a pilot study designed to develop a larger programme to investigate the ancient use of Chinese medicinal plants in Xinjiang, botanically one of the richest areas for such plants in China. The establishment of a reference database for specific aspects of the identification of the Chinese medicinal plants of Xinjiang will be of importance to understand the practice of modern Chinese medicine.

Funding
$7000


Multi-lingual education policy and school linguistic practice: Globalisation and Language Education for ethnic minorities in China

Dr Tsung, Linda; Senior Lecturer; Chinese Studies; School of Languages and Cultures

Project Outline
This project will explore China’s national language policy for its ethnic minorities and consider tensions in translating multilingual language policy (Mandarin Chinese, minority language and English) to classroom linguistic practice and especially the paradoxical role of and demand for Chinese as a tool of political stability for multilingual populations.

Funding
$20 000


China and Eurasia in Antiquity: Excavation and Survey at Adunqiaolu Site, Wenquan County, Xinjiang

Associate Professor Betts, Alison V G; Department of Archaeology; School of Philosophical and Historical Inquiry

Project Outline
The University of Sydney Xinjiang Archaeological Research Team has been offered a unique opportunity to undertake collaborative excavations with a team from the Archaeological Institute, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences (CASS) at Adunqiaolu, a Bronze Age site in Wenquan County, Xinjiang at the far western border of China, an area that in prehistory was a critical location for cultural transmission from, and exchange with, Eurasia. Fieldwork from this project should yield significant new data on cultural contacts and agricultural practices, as well as providing important absolute dating evidence (C14) that will substantially strengthen the broader chronological framework for the Bronze Age in the region.

Funding
$10 000


Regulation and authentication of scheduled and toxic Chinese herbs in Australia

Dr Li, George Qian; Sesquicentenary Lecturer in Herbal Medicines
Coordinator, HMREC; Herbal Medicines Research and Education Centre; Faculty of Pharmacy

Project Outline
Dr. Li’s project aims to build a database and a depository of scheduled and toxic Chinese herbs in Australia in order to inform the safe use of Chinese herbal medicines in Western countries. From 1 July 2012, Chinese medicine practitioners will be part of the National Registration and Accreditation Scheme under the Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency, Health Practitioner Regulation National Law Act (the National Law) (http://www.ahpra.gov.au/). To support the registration of TCM practitioners and their practice and protect the public, there is a need for infrastructure on the regulation and authentication of scheduled and toxic Chinese herbs.

Funding
$40 000


Mapping Chinese Urbanization: The Politics of Land and Resettlement

Dr Lu, Duanfang; Senior Lecturer; Architecture; Faculty of Architecture, Design and Planning

Project Outline
This project examines complexities and tensions surrounding land and development in China, with a focus on the ‘new land enclosure movement’ and resettlement program in rural areas. The research will deepen the interdisciplinary comprehension of what are at stake in Chinese urban development and provide offer new theoretical and empirical resources for rethinking sustainable urbanization.

Funding
$20 000


China’s Foreign Aid: A Norm Taker or a Norm Maker?

Dr Reilly, James; Lecturer; Government and International Relations; School of Social and Political Sciences

Project Outline
Dr. Reilly’s research examines the extent to which China is acting more like a norm maker or a norm taker in the case of China’s Official Development Assistance (ODA).The People’s Republic of China is now the world’s second largest economy. China is the fastest growing major economy, second largest trading nation, largest exporter,second largest importer, and largest holder of foreign reserves. A member or observer of some seventy-two international organizations, China has begun to translate its economic might into multilateral influence. This research will consider the following questions: How will China use its newfound economic and political clout? Under what conditions are Chinese leaders more likely to either (a) accept and adhere to the norms and practices of global institutions or (b) demand that these institutions be reshaped to reflect China’s own national interests and ideals? More broadly, as a state rises in global power, when is it more likely to either accommodate international norms or strive to reshape international norms?

Funding
$22 266


How do East Asian state and non-state illicit political actors use commercial networks and methods to accomplish their goals?

Dr Hastings, Justin; Lecturer; Department of Government and International Relations

Project Outline
Dr Hastings’ research will address the following questions: How do East Asian state and non-state illicit political actors use commercial networks and methods to accomplish their goals? How does the nature of East Asian economic development help, hinder, or otherwise shape illicit political actors’ structure and capabilities, and the threat they pose? What can this research tell us about the economic involvement of illicit political actors in other parts of the world?”

Funding
$22 266