Bachelor of Health Sciences

The information on this page applies to future students. Current students should refer to their faculty handbooks for course information.

This degree provides a pathway to many careers in healthcare. You can major in a range of professional fields, with a thorough grounding in health and health systems at the local, national and global level. Some of the majors include: management, marketing, anatomy and histology, movement science, hearing and speech, psychology, industrial relations, human relations management, information systems, sociology and a number of different language studies. Graduates can expect to move directly into health or industries supporting health in the private or public health sector. The broad, detailed understanding of health is also invaluable for future careers in specialist health professions.

The Bachelor of Health Sciences has been designed by leading health experts with input from industry and employers who are calling out for graduates with a broad range of skills and understanding of health.

Students complete two majors in this three-year degree. In the Health Sciences major, students learn the latest in health, including multidisciplinary, evidence-based approaches to the design and delivery of health services. Students look at the political, social, behavioural, environmental, economic and international contexts of health systems and delivery of health services and how these impact on individual and community access to healthcare and their health.

A choice of ten second majors enables students to complement their knowledge of health with a range of professional fields relevant to healthcare, the many sectors supporting the healthcare system and industries beyond.

You will gain high level analytical, critical thinking, communication and research skills. Coupled with your knowledge of health at local and international levels, e-health and leadership, you will be ready to contribute to a sector which is changing and adapting to new and emerging health conditions and illnesses and technological advances.

Graduates can expect to move directly into the health sector, including public, private and non-government organisations in health promotion, policy-making, project and case management, logistics and procurement, or work in insurance, business development, marketing and public relations and more.

You can choose to undertake an additional two-year master’s degree to become a clinical practitioner, such as physiotherapy, occupational therapy, rehabilitation counselling, diagnostic radiography or speech pathology. There are many other study opportunities to further your career, such as disability, public health, international public health, medicine, research, administration or law.

Honours is an additional year of study, allowing you to specialise in an area of health that interests you, developing your research skills and increasing your employment prospects.

**All students in the first year of the Bachelor of Health Sciences study at Camperdown Campus. In 2019 the Faculty of Health Sciences is expected to be relocated to a new health-dedicated facility on the Camperdown Campus of the University of Sydney.**

Course outline

http://sydney.edu.au/handbooks/health_sci/undergraduate/b_health_sciences_unit_of_study_table.shtml 

Study plan

Completion of two majors is a requirement of the course. Except as specified in the Bachelor of Health Sciences Table of units of study, units counted towards one major may not count towards any other major completed.

The Health Sciences Major comprises 60 credit points of units of study, including:

·         18 credit points of Junior core units, as listed in the Bachelor of Health Sciences Table;

·         6 credit points of a core Psychology unit, as listed in the Bachelor of Health Sciences Table;

·         6 credit points of a Junior Biology unit, chosen from Science Table 1; and

·         6 credit points of a core Intermediate unit, as listed in the Bachelor of Health Sciences Table; and

·         24 credit points of Senior units, chosen from the Bachelor of Health Sciences Table, including a minimum of 6 credit points of Senior Research units chosen from the Bachelor of Health Sciences Senior Research unit list.

Majors

Further course information

Progression rules

Completion of two majors is a requirement of the course. Except as specified in the Bachelor of Health Sciences Table of units of study, units counted towards one major may not count towards any other major completed.

The Health Sciences Major comprises 60 credit points of units of study, including:
18 credit points of Junior core units, as listed in the Bachelor of Health Sciences Table;
6 credit points of a core Psychology unit, as listed in the Bachelor of Health Sciences Table;
6 credit points of a Junior Biology unit, chosen from Science Table 1; and
6 credit points of a core Intermediate unit, as listed in the Bachelor of Health Sciences Table; and
24 credit points of Senior units, chosen from the Bachelor of Health Sciences Table, including a minimum of 6 credit points of Senior Research units chosen from the Bachelor of Health Sciences Senior Research unit list.

Course outcomes and further study

Graduate opportunities

You will gain high level analytical, critical thinking, communication and research skills. Coupled with your knowledge of health at local and international levels, eHealth and leadership, you will be ready to contribute to a sector which is changing and adapting to new and emerging health conditions and illnesses and technological advances.

Healthcare is the fastest growing sector of the Australian economy. Graduates can expect to move directly into the health sector, including public, private and non-government organisations in health promotion, policy-making, project and case management, logistics and procurement, or work in insurance, business development, marketing and public relations.

You can choose to undertake an additional two-year master’s degree to become a clinical practitioner, such as physiotherapist, occupational therapist, rehabilitation counsellor, diagnostic radiographer or speech pathologist. There are many other study opportunities to further your career, such as disability, public health, medicine, research, administration or law.

Honours is an additional year of study, allowing you to specialise in an area of health that interests you, developing your research skills and enhancing your employment prospects.

About honours

The Honours program allows you to specialise in a niche area of personal interest, develops your research skills and increases your employment prospects. Admission is competitive, and students who are offered a place in the honours program must have demonstrated consistent, high level performance throughout their studies; be eligible for the award of a pass degree and be judged to have the aptitude to conduct a research project.

Here is just a small number of potential honours projects you could work on:

• Friction and strength: Investigation of the grip performance of
rock climbers
• Can you learn pathology in less than a second?
• Community attitudes towards older people
• Breast screening practices among South East Asian women
living in Sydney
• Injury prevalence and characteristics in elite junior rugby
league players
• Energy drink and alcohol consumption in Australia
• Risk status and resilience in families with parents with
intellectual disability
• Life history and health
• Improving MRI according to human perception
http://sydney.edu.au/health_sciences/future_students/undergraduate/honours

Admission

Admission requirements

Admission to this course is on the basis of a secondary school leaving qualification such as the NSW Higher School Certificate (including national and international equivalents), tertiary study or an approved preparation program. English language requirements must be met where these are not demonstrated by sufficient qualifications taught in English. Special admission pathways are open for domestic mature aged applicants who do not possess a school leaving qualification, educationally disadvantaged applicants and for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. Applicants are ranked by merit and offers for available places are issued according to the ranking.

How to apply

Domestic students

How to apply

Prospective domestic students apply through the Universities Admission Centre (UAC) for a Commonwealth Supported Place. Refer to the UAC website for key dates.

Current students applying to transfer from one bachelor degree to another, apply directly to the University. The exact process will depend on the course you are currently in and the course to which you wish to transfer. For more information visit the transferring courses page.

Current students applying to transfer from a diploma to a bachelor degree must apply through UAC.

For other useful information, visit our How to Apply page.

Assumed knowledge

None

International students

How to apply

Prospective International students: visit our How to Apply page.
Current students applying to transfer from one bachelor degree to another, apply directly to the University. The exact process will depend on the course you are currently in and the course to which you wish to transfer.

For more information visit the Transferring courses page.

Fee disclaimer

Domestic students

Indicative Undergraduate Student Contribution Amount

This student contribution amount for a Commonwealth Supported Place is an indication only of the fees that are payable by you in the calendar year you commence your course, commencing in 2016 for a standard annual full time load of 48 credit points (1.0 EFTSL). The exact student contribution that you pay will depend on the specific units of study in which you ultimately enrol. If you are a Commonwealth supported student and was enrolled in a University course before 1 January 2015 your student contribution may differ.

For further information about how to calculate your specific total student contribution, please refer to the University's Future Students' website.

Annual review

Importantly, student contribution amounts are subject to annual review by the University, and are likely to increase each year of your period of study (subject to a Commonwealth specified cap), effective at the start of each calendar year.

Additional incidental fees

For some courses there are incidental fees additional to the student contribution. Some of those fees are significant, for example, faculty-specific materials, tools, protected clothing, and equipment. For further information about these additional incidental fees, please visit the University's Future Students' website.

Potential for inaccuracy

Whilst every reasonable effort has been made to include correct and up to date information here, you are also advised to consult directly with the Student Centre for domestic students or the International Office for international students so that they can provide you with specific and up to date information about those fees.

International students

Indicative international tuition fees for undergraduate students

This international tuition fee is an indication only of the fees that are payable by you in the calendar year you commence your course, commencing in 2016, for a standard annual full time load of 48 credit points (1.0 EFTSL). The exact tuition fees that you pay will depend on the specific units of study in which you ultimately enrol.

For further information about how to calculate your specific total tuition fees, please refer to the University's Future Students' website.

Annual review

Importantly, tuition fees are subject to annual review, and are likely to increase each year of your period of study, effective at the start of each calendar year.

Additional incidental fees and health insurance

For some courses there are incidental fees additional to the tuition fees. Some of those fees are significant, for example, faculty-specific materials, tools, protected clothing, and equipment. For further information about these additional incidental fees, please visit the University's Future Students' website.

In addition to the fees indicated here for the course of study, International Students studying on an Australian Student Visa must have appropriate health insurance for the duration of their studies on a Student Visa through an approved provider of the Overseas Student Health Cover (OSHC) scheme. This is a requirement of the Australian Government, unless otherwise exempted by the Government.

Potential for inaccuracy

Whilst every reasonable effort has been made to include correct and up to date information here, you are also advised to consult directly with the Student Centre for domestic students or the International Office for international students so that they can provide you with specific and up to date information about those fees.