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Doctor of Medicine

Become a doctor - study medicine at the University of Sydney

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    Sydney Medical School is ranked first in Australia and 15th in the world in the QS World University Rankings by subject 2017.

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Overview

Domestic and international applications for 2018 entry have now closed and will reopen for 2019 entry in May 2018. The Admissions Guides 2018 are for your information only. The Admissions Guides 2019 will be posted in March/April 2018.

The Doctor of Medicine (MD) is a four year professional postgraduate medical degree offering you clinical experience at leading hospitals, research opportunities at world-leading institutes, and established elective placements throughout Europe, Africa, North America and Asia. Our course will provide you with current best practice in medical education, high teacher-student ratios and extensive scholarship support. You will graduate as a medical practitioner who is responsive to the health needs of individuals, families and communities and committed to improving the health care system at all levels. Our students come from a range of backgrounds and academic disciplines.

The MD program comprises 4 broad themes that run through all four years of the course. These themes are: Basic and Clinical Sciences, Patient and Doctor, Population Medicine, and Personal and Professional Development.

In Years 1 and 2, students work through a number of Blocks that cover all body systems from both basic science and clinical perspectives, with an emphasis on understanding the scientific foundations of clinical reasoning and clinical practice.

In Stage 3 (Years 3 and 4 of the program), students cover all major aspects of clinical medicine.

Research methodology is introduced in year 1 of the program. Students gain experience with developing and managing a research project under supervision. The project culminates in a written report or an article suitable for publication.

Years 1 & 2 are spent primarily on the main university campus at Camperdown, but clinical training commences in the first weeks of the program. For years 3 & 4, students are based in their clinical school. Clinical learning occurs at multiple widely-dispersed sites (hospitals and community, metropolitan, urban and rural).

Please refer to the Sydney Medical School's website for further information.

Specialisations

There are no specialisations for this course.

Entry, fees, funding & how to apply

Depends on your qualification, citizenship status

The details on this page based on your selections are a guide only, and are subject to change.

Your fee

How to apply

What you'll study

The Sydney Doctor of Medicine Program is undertaken full-time over four years. First year (known as Stage 1 of the program) and the second year (Stage 2) consist of clinical problems presented in tutorials in which concepts of health and disease are related to the basic biomedical sciences. This ensures that the knowledge and problem-solving abilities which underpin medical practice have a strong scientific foundation. From the second week of Stage 1 students have patient contact in the various clinical schools at Westmead Hospital, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Royal North Shore Hospital, Concord Hospital, Nepean Hospital and Dubbo Hospital. Clinical training is undertaken at large urban hospitals and smaller rural hospitals affording a balanced view of urban and rural health care and their differences. Across the hospitals a huge range of specialisations are catered for, with paediatrics and its subspecialties being the focus of the Children's Hospital at Westmead.


Research methodology is introduced in year 1, with students developing a research plan by the end of year 2. The research project culminates in a written report or an article suitable for publication by the end of year 4.


While practical clinical experience forms the basis for all learning in the latter two years of the Sydney Medical Program, it is accompanied by a structured teaching program. The balance between clerkship-based activities and scheduled sessions varies. In general, formal teaching sessions reduce in number and frequency as students move throughout years 3 and 4 of Stage 3 and are essentially withdrawn in the pre-internship block.

Units of Study

Admission requirements

For the admissions criteria and application processes, please refer to the current Admissions Guide. The Admissions Guides 2018 are for your information only. The Admissions Guides 2019 will be posted in March/April 2018.

With effect from 2020, the MD Program curriculum will be revised to include more time in clinical settings and preparation for practice. Biomedical science knowledge teaching and learning in Year 1 will therefore be at higher level than the current program. The changes have been endorsed by Sydney Medical School and are subject to approval by the University of Sydney Academic Board.

The assumed knowledge on entry to the MD Program will be in anatomy, physiology and molecular/cellular biology. At or before the start of the MD Program, students will be required to complete an online Foundation Knowledge Course and self- assessment, developed and delivered by Sydney Medical School. This online course will cover the assumed knowledge. Students entering the MD Program from 2020 onwards will have access to the Foundation Knowledge Course once they have been offered and have accepted a place in the Program.

Sydney Medical School highly values the diversity of the medical student community and encourages entry of students from diverse backgrounds and with a wide variety of undergraduate degrees. This philosophy will be maintained after the 2020 changes. A Biomedical Science undergraduate degree is NOT a requirement for entry to the MD Program, and all MD Program students must complete the Foundation Knowledge Course regardless of their prior degree.

Further information will be posted on Sydney Medical School's website in due course.

Note:
Sydney Medical School regularly reviews the admissions criteria and application processes for its courses, including the Doctor of Medicine (MD). It reserves the right to change these criteria and processes without notice. Statements in the current Admissions Guide and information on this website provide advice about the currently applicable criteria and processes, and may not be correct for future application periods.

It is possible that GPA scores will, in the future, be incorporated into the ranking of applicants for entry into the MD. It is also possible that the GPA requirement will be increased. Applicants are advised to consult Sydney Medical School's website  on a regular basis for any updates.

The academic requirements that are displayed are applicable to currently available courses only, and are updated annually in October and may be changed without notice. The Handbooks Online and the University of Sydney Calendar are the official legal source of information relating to study at the University of Sydney, and you are referred to those documents.

Professional accreditation

The Doctor of Medicine is recognised in the World Health Organization Directory of Medical Schools. Countries that recognise the MD, with varying conditions, include Canada, Malaysia, Singapore, South Africa, the United Kingdom and the United States. 

The Doctor of Medicine is accredited by the Australian Medical Council.

Following the successful completion of the program, graduates will be awarded a Doctor of Medicine (MD) from the University of Sydney.

Graduates may then enter the medical workforce, primarily in the major public teaching hospitals, and complete a 1 year internship program.

Upon successful completion of this internship junior doctors are eligible to receive full registration with the State Medical Board or Council.

In general, registration in one state of Australia entitles the doctor to registration in other states.

Most junior doctors undertake an additional year of hospital training before commencing postgraduate medical training leading to specialisation. Specialist medical training is carried out by the relevant specialty medical college in conjunction with the state public health system. This training is not conducted by universities.

Graduates intending to practise medicine in a country other than Australia must satisfy the particular requirements of that country.

Future study options

Outstanding graduates may be eligible to pursue a postgraduate coursework masters or a higher degree by research in the courses of Doctor of Philosophy and Master of Philosophy offered by Sydney Medical School. Further details can be found here.

Other study options

Sydney Medical School offers a wide range of short professional development courses for health professionals through its clinical schools, disciplines and associated research institutes.

Many of the courses offered are pre-accredited for Continuing Medical Education (CME) points, and other courses may be awarded CME points on request to your relevant association or professional body. For further information and a list of courses available please see the Sydney Medical School website.

Graduate opportunities

One year of internship is required prior to registration. In Australia, State Health Departments are responsible for the funding of, and placement of students for, internships. Internships are therefore determined by the relevant State Health Departments, not universities. The NSW Health Department has made it clear that no Australian trained international medical student is guaranteed an internship upon graduation. Please visit the Health Education and Training Institute (HETI) website for any updates.

Australian-trained international medical graduates may stay on and work as interns in public hospitals and access vocational medical training. This policy however is subject to change. Australian-trained international students should check the current situation at the Department of Immigration and Border Protection website or contact the department for details.

Most junior doctors make their career choice during their second postgraduate year, most commonly opting for general practice or one of the specialties. Clinical training under the supervision of one of the specialist colleges (RACGP, RACP, RACS, etc) takes between three and six years in most instances. Australia is in special need of doctors for rural and remote practice, including Indigenous health care. Other careers for Sydney medical graduates include medical research, teaching, medical administration, medical communication or journalism, consulting and overseas aid work.

Domestic students

Indicative Postgraduate Student Contribution Amount


The student contribution amount for a Commonwealth Supported Place is an indication only of the amount payable in Year 1 for a standard full time load of 48 credit points (1.0 EFTSL). The exact student contribution that you pay will depend on the calendar year in which you undertake your study, and the specific units of study in which you ultimately enrol. For further information about how to calculate your specific total student contribution, please refer to the University's Tuition Fees website.

Annual review and fee increases


Importantly, student contribution amounts are subject to annual review by the University, and will increase each year of your period of study (subject to a Commonwealth specified cap), effective at the start of each calendar year.

Indicative Postgraduate Domestic Tuition Fee


The tuition fee for a domestic postgraduate student is an indication only of the fees payable in Year 1 for a standard full time load of 48 credit points (1.0 EFTSL). Depending on the calendar year in which you undertake your study, and if your study load is more or less than the 1.0 EFTSL, your tuition fee will differ from the indicative amount.

Annual review and fee increase


Importantly, tuition fees are subject to annual review by the University, and will increase each year of your period of study, effective at the start of each calendar year.

Additional incidental costs


For some courses there are incidental costs additional to the student contribution and/or course fee. Some of these incidental costs are significant, for example, course-specific materials, tools, protected clothing and equipment. Further information about these costs is available from https://sydney.edu.au/students/materials-and-equipment.html.

Credit card surcharge


Please note that a surcharge of 0.8% will apply for payments made by Visa, MasterCard or American Express. The surcharge is subject to review and may change. Information about payment methods and the surcharge is set out at: http://sydney.edu.au/study/finances-fees-costs/fees-and-loans/paying-your-fees.html.

Potential for inaccuracy


Whilst every reasonable effort has been made to include correct and up to date information here, you are also advised to consult directly with the Student Centre so that they can provide you with specific and up to date information about fees.

International students

Indicative International Tuition Fees for Postgraduate Students


The tuition fee for international postgraduate students is an indication only of the fees payable in Year 1 for a standard full time load of 48 credit points (1.0 EFTSL). Depending on the calendar year in which you undertake your study, and if your study load is more or less than the 1.0 EFTSL, your tuition fee will differ from the indicative amount.

Annual review and fee increases


Importantly, tuition fees are subject to annual review, and will increase each year of your period of study, effective at the start of each calendar year.

Additional incidental costs and health insurance


For some courses there are incidental costs additional to the tuition fees. Some of these incidental costs are significant, for example, course-specific materials, tools, protected clothing, and equipment. Further information about these costs is available from https://sydney.edu.au/students/materials-and-equipment.html. In addition to the fees indicated here for the course of study, International Students studying on an Australian Student Visa must have appropriate health insurance for the duration of their studies on a Student Visa through an approved provider of the Overseas Student Health Cover (OSHC) scheme. This is a requirement of the Australian Government, unless otherwise exempted by the Government.

Credit card surcharge


Please note that a surcharge of 0.8% will apply for payments made by Visa, MasterCard or American Express. The surcharge is subject to review and may change. Information about payment methods and the surcharge is set out at: http://sydney.edu.au/study/finances-fees-costs/fees-and-loans/paying-your-fees.html.

Potential for inaccuracy


Whilst every reasonable effort has been made to include correct and up to date information here, you are also advised to consult directly with the Student Centre so that they can provide you with specific and up to date information about fees.

To help you understand common terms that we use at the University, we offer an online glossary.