Chinese Laws and Chinese Legal Systems (LAWS6001)

UNIT OF STUDY

This unit will provide students with an overall picture of the modern Chinese legal system. It will develop a perception of its unique character by tracing its role through major social epochs and the role of law in a socialist market economy. It will examine the concept of law as a political function and the implementation of law, not so much through courts, as through administrative fiats and authority, making law essentially a function of politics and administration. The unit will illustrate these perceptions through the study of various legal regimes. Lecture topics may include: Chinese legal history; Chinese legal system; criminal law and procedure; constitutional law; civil law and procedure; legal profession; environmental law; contract law; property law; company law; intellectual property law; foreign joint ventures; arbitration and mediation; foreign trade law and taxation law. The coursework component of the unit is residential and is conducted on the campus of the East China University of Politics & Law in Shanghai, People's Republic of China. Lectures will be given in English in Shanghai by professors from the East China University of Politics & Law. There will also be a visit to a Chinese law firm.

Further unit of study information

Classes

Nov 22 to Dec 11

Assessment

2hr exam to be completed in Shanghai (30%) and 8000wd essay (70%) due in February

Faculty/department permission required?

Yes

Unit of study rules

Prerequisites and assumed knowledge

Assumed knowledge: LAWS6252 or a law degree from a common law or civil law jurisdiction

Prohibitions

LAWS3068, LAWS3014, LAWS6857, LAWS5368

Study this unit outside a degree

Non-award/non-degree study

If you wish to undertake one or more units of study (subjects) for your own interest but not towards a degree, you may enrol in single units as a non-award student.

Cross-institutional study

If you are from another Australian tertiary institution you may be permitted to underake cross-institutional study in one or more units of study at the University of Sydney.