student profile: Ms Ann Leaf


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Thesis work

Thesis title: NSW secondary deputy principals: leading learning and learning to lead

Supervisors: George ODHIAMBO , Rachel WILSON

Thesis abstract:

All over the developed world, the accountability of school leaders has increased to improve teacher quality and student performance. Leadership models now recognise the importance of shared leadership which requires school leaders and other staff to work together to improve the learning of both students and their teachers. Internationally there has been considerable research on the principal's role as a leader of learning. However, there is a dearth of international research on their deputies' role, as the next generation of principals, and other senior educational leaders. Deputies' expertise and experience as potential educational change agents is often redirected to management and administration. Their professional learning is often ad hoc and lacking a consistent framework to prepare them for the career path of their choice.Using mixed methods, this PhD will contribute to addressing the literature gap into NSW secondary deputy principalship. Through a survey and a multiple case study in the government and non-government systems, it will investigate to what extent NSW deputies are leading learning in their schools and their self-reported knowledge of, and skills in addressing the Lead Standard of the Australian Professional Standards for Teachers. The study will also examine the professional learning these deputies need to support them in their role as future principals or leaders in other educational contexts.

Selected publications

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Journals

  • Leaf, A., Odhiambo, G. (2017). The deputy principal instructional leadership role and professional learning: Perceptions of secondary principals, deputies and teachers. Journal of Educational Administration, 55(1), 33-48. [More Information]

2017

  • Leaf, A., Odhiambo, G. (2017). The deputy principal instructional leadership role and professional learning: Perceptions of secondary principals, deputies and teachers. Journal of Educational Administration, 55(1), 33-48. [More Information]

Note: This profile is for a student at the University of Sydney. Views presented here are not necessarily those of the University.