student profile: Ms Bethany Wilkinson

BSW (Hons) PhD SW (candidate)

Telephone + 61 2 9351 3767
Fax + 61 2 9351 3783

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Biographical details

Prior to commencing at the University of Sydney, Bethany worked in the welfare sector for nine years. Her background includes working in the areas of mental health, housing (women and children), domestic violence (women and children) and with women who do sex work.

Research interests

Gender, Intimate Partner Homicide and the Law.

Teaching and supervision

Violence Against Women - Master of Social Work (Qualifying) - 2014

Violence Against Women and Children- 4th year Social Work Undergraduate Program - 2013, 2014 and 2015

Integrative Studies - 4th year Social Work Undergraduate Program - 2014

Social Justice, Social Citizenship and Social Work - 3rd year Social Work Undergraduate Program - 2014

Psychology for Social Work - 2nd year Social Work Undergraduate Program - 2014

Theories and Concepts of Policing - 1st year Policing Undergraduate Program - 2014 (University of Western Sydney).

Family Violence: Policy and Practice - senior unit of study (elective) - 2013 (University of Western Sydney).

Thesis work

Thesis title: Law: what is it good for? Women's Experiences of Apprehended Domestic Violence Orders (ADVOs) in the context of Intimate Partner Homicide

Supervisors: Susan HEWARD-BELLE , Susan GOODWIN

Thesis abstract:

In Australia protection orders are seen as the key legal response to intimate partner violence. However, prevalence data indicates that nationally “on average” one woman continues to be killed every week by her male current or former intimate partner. In NSW, the statistics suggest that (approximately) between one quarter and one third of the women who were killed in the context of intimate partner violence held a protection order prior to or at the time of their death. Thus, it appears that “protection” order are indeed, not protecting women. Exploring the role of protection orders in preventing, or otherwise, intimate partner homicide deaths is circumscribed by the fact that the key informant about these circumstances, the victim, is no longer available to contribute their knowledge. Domestic Violence Death Reviews provide an official narrative of the woman’s journey in the lead up to the homicide. However, little research has been undertaken both nationally and internationally on the lay or the family and/or friends' or supporters' perspectives of the woman's journey of navigating the protection order system. Researching the perspectives of family and/or friends' or supporters' of Intimate Partner Homicide (IPH) holds the potential to increase our understanding of the events (including the use of protection orders) that led up to the IPH because family members and friends hold intimate and first hand knowledge of the homicide victims and perpetrators relationship. This study explores this phenomenon through a detailed case analysis of the “official” narrative and “lay” knowledge of the experiences of 10 women who died in the context of intimate partner violence during the period 2010 to 2016.

Current projects

Law: what is it good for? Women's Experiences of Apprended Domestic Violence Orders in the context of Intimate Partner Homicide

"She was admitted acutely psychotic but she wasn't, in fact she was a victim of domestic violence" World Views of Mental Health Workers about Women who experience Domestic Violence and Mental Health Concerns. This research is one component of theTowards Better Practice: Enhancing collaboration between domestic violence and mental health services, Sydney, Faculty of Education and Social Work, University of Sydney (Laing, Toivonen, Irwin, & Napier 2010).

References

Laing, L., Toivonen, C., Irwin, J., & Napier, L. (2010). ?They never asked me anything about that?: The stories of women who experience domestic violence and mental health concerns/illness. A report from the research project: Towards Better Practice: Enhancing collaboration between domestic violence and mental health services, Sydney, Faculty of Education and Social Work, University of Sydney.

Awards and honours

Australian Post Graduate Research Award - 2014

2015 National Conference on Health and Domestic Violence - Washington DC -

USA - Conference Paper and Presentation - Worldviews of mental health workers

about women who experience domestic violence and mental health concerns

Note: This profile is for a student at the University of Sydney. Views presented here are not necessarily those of the University.